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Alabama Confederate Units

First Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This was the first regiment organized under the act of the State legislature authorizing the enlistment of troops for twelve months. The companies rendezvoused at Pensacola in February and March 1861, and about the 1st of April organized by the election of regimental officers. Transferred to the army of the Confederate States soon after, it remained on duty at Pensacola for a year. It was chiefly occupied in manning the batteries and took part in the bombardments of November 23, and January 1, 1862. A detachment was in the night fight on Santa Rosa Island. Being the oldest regiment in the Confederate service, it was first called on to re-enlist for the war, at the end of the first year, and seven of the companies did so. Ordered to Tennessee, the regiment, 1000 strong, reached Island Ten March 12, 1862. In the severe conflict there, all but a remnant of the regiment were captured. Those who escaped were organized into a battalion, which was part of the garrision at Fort Pillow, and afterwards fought at Corinth. Those captured were exchanged in September, and the regiment rendezvoused at Jackson, Miss., having lost 150 by death in prison, 150 by casualties since and during the siege of Island Ten. At once ordered to Port Hudson, they participated in the privations of that siege. They were captured, after losing 150 killed and wounded. The privates were paroled and the officers kept in prison till the peace. The men were exchanged in the fall, and joined Gen. Johnston in Mississippi, 610 strong. The regiment was then at Mobile and Pollard, and joined Gen. Johnston at Alatoona. In Cantey's brigade, it fought at New Hope, and was afterwards transferred to the brigade of Gen. Quarles, in which it served till the end. It participated at Kennesa, and lost considerably at Peach Tree Creek. In the terrible assault on the enemy's lines at Atlanta, July 28, the regiment won fresh renown, but lost half of its force in killed and wounded. Moving with Hood into Tennessee, it again lost very heavily at Franklin and Nashville. Transferred to North Carolina, it took part at Averysboro and Bentonville, and about 100 men surrendered at Goldsboro. Upwards of 3000 names were on its rolls at different times during the war, including the companies that did not re-enlist.

Field and Staff

Colonels - Henry D. Clayton of Barbour; till re-organized. Isaiah G.W. Steedman of Wilcox; captured at Island Ten and Port Hudson.

Lieutenant Colonels - I.G.W. Steedman; promoted. M.B. Locke of Pike; wounded and captured at Port Hudson.

Majors - Jere N. Williams of Barbour; till re-organized. Samual L. Knox of Talladega; captured at Island Ten; captured at Port Hudson, but escaped; wounded at Atlanta; killed in command of the regiment of Franklin.

Adjutants - S.H. Dent of Barbour; resigned. Samuel D. Steedman of Wilcox; captured at Island Ten and Port Hudson.

Captains and Counties from which the companies came.

Tallapoosa - James D. Meadows; captured at Island Ten and Port Hudson; murdered by the guard at Johnson's Island.

Pike - Augustus H. Owen; resigned. J.H. Wood.

Lowndes - Y.D. Conyers; resigned. John T. Stubbs; captured at Island Ten and Port Hudson.

Wilcox - D. Wardlaw of Ramsay; captured at Island Ten and Port Hudson.

Talladega - Joseph H. Johnson; resigned. R.H. Isbell; captured at Port Hudson.

Pike - George W. Dawson; till re-organized. M.B. Locke; captured at Island Ten; elected lieutenant colonel. R.H. Riley; captured at Port Hudson.

Barbour - Alpheus Baker; resigned. (Company disbanded at the end of the first year.)

Barbour - John W. Clarke. (Company disbanded at the end of the first year.)

Mobile - Ben Lane Posey. (Company disbanded at the end of the first year.)

War Record

Barbour - J.W. Mabry; not re-elected. Richard Williams; captured at Island Ten; wounded and captured at Port Hudson.

Barbour (1862) - Wm. H. Pruitt; captured at Port Hudson.

Montgomery and Autauga (1862) - J.F. Whitfield; captured at Island Ten and Port Hudson.

Macon (1862) - C.A. Stanton; captured at Island Ten; resigned. C.C. Knowles; captured at Port Hudson.

Second Alabama

Infantry Regiment

The Second was composed of companies which flocked to the seaboard at the first call of the State, and enlisted for a year. They organized at Fort Morgan in April 1861, and remained in garrison there till March 1862, manning heavy artillery. Ordered to Tennessee, the term of service expired at Fort Pillow, and it was disbanded. Two or three companies almost intact joined other organizations; but the mass distributed themselves among new regiments, and infused a leaven of discipline into their ranks.

Field and Staff

Colonel - Harry Maury of Mobile.

Lieutenant Colonel - Hal C. Bradford of Jackson.

Majors - Philander Morgan of Talladega; resigned. D. P. Forney of Calhoun.

Adjutant - J.B. McClung of Madison.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Calhoun - D.P. Forney; promoted. William M. Hames.

Pickens - Thomas C. Lanier.

Franklin - John Goodwin.

Jackson - Alexander M. Saxon.

Monroe - George W. Foster.

Clarke - Stephen B. Cleveland; resigned. A.R. Lanford.

Mobile - W.C. Fergus.

Mobile - .... Watson.

Mobile - Ed. McDonald; resigned. A.H. Jennette.

Mobile - .... Taylor; resigned. J.B.V. Lefebvre.

Third Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Montgomery, April 1861, and was the first Alabama command that went to Virginia. Mustered into service at Lynchburg, May 4, the regiment was ordered to Norfolk. There it was in a temporary brigade with the First and Twelfth Virginia, under Col. Withers, who was soon after succeeded by Col. Mahone. For twelve months the Third remained at Norfolk, and there re-enlisted, but saw no active service. Norfolk was evacuated May 5, 1862, and the regiment fell back with the army. At Seven Pines it was held in reserve the first day; but was badly cut up the second, losing 38 killed and 122 wounded. A fortnight later it was attached to Rodes' brigade which now consisted of the Third, Fifth, Sixth, Twelfth, and Twenty-sixth of Alabama regiments. The brigade, led by Col. J.B. Gordon of the Sixth, participated in the week of battle before Richmond, as part of D.H. Hill's division. The Third lost 207 out of 345 men and officers at the bloody repulse of Malvern Hill, and mustered with only 180 men a few days after that terrible conflict, but soon recruited to 300. Hill's division was not engaged at Cedar Run or the second Manassas, but moved with the army, and the Third Alabama was the first to the plant the "stars and bars" on the hills of Maryland. At Boonsboro the fighting was prolonged and desperate, as it was at Sharpsburg, and the Third shared in the triumphs of those bloody days. It moved back into Virginia with the army, and was in line of battle at Fredericksburg. At Chancellorsville it shared prominently in the glories achieved by Jackson's corps in the splendid assault on Hooker, and in the two days lost 24 killed, and 125 wounded. In the second Maryland campaign, the Third moved with Ewell's corps, to which it now belonged, as far as Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. It lost heavily at Gettysburg, fighting both days with much credit, and shared in the privations of the retreat. After the return to Virginia, it skirmished at Mine Run, and wintered at Orange Courthouse. Now under Brig. Gen. Battle, the regiment bore conspicuous part in the battles of Wilderness and Spottsylvania, losing very severely. In the fighting at the second Cold Harbor, it charged the enemy's breastworks, and lost considerably. It was with Early in the Valley, and in Maryland, taking part in the demonstration against Washington, and in the pursuit of Hunter. At Winchester its loss was heavy, and it suffered severely at Cedar Hill, but protected the rear of the retreating army. Placed in the trenches at Petersburg, the Third dwindled away by attrition till only about 40 laid down their arms at Appomatox. Of 1651 names on its roll, about 260 perished in battle, 119 died in the service, and 605 were discharged or transferred.

Field and Staff

Colonels - Jones M. Withers of Mobile; promoted. Tennent Lomax; promoted, but killed in command. Cullen A. Battle of Macon; wounded at Sharpsburg; promoted. Chas. Forsyth of Mobile.

Lieutenant Colonels - Tennent Lomax; promoted. Cullen A. Battle; promoted. Charles Forsyth; promoted. Robert M. Sands of Mobile.

Majors - Cullen A. Battle; promoted. Charles Forsyth; promoted. R.M. Sands; wounded at Gettysburg; promoted. Richard H. Powell of Macon; wounded at Spottsylvania.

Adjutants - Charles Forsyth; promoted. Isaiah A. Wilson of Macon; resigned. Alfred R. Murray of Mobile; transferred. Samuel B. Johnston of Macon; killed at Seven Pines. Mirabeau B. Swanson of Macon; transferred. Alexander H. Picket of Macon; transferred. David R. Dunlap of Mobile; wounded at Cedar Creek.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Mobile - Robert M. Sands; promoted. T. Casey Witherspoon; wounded and captured at Sharpsburg.

Mobile - Wm. H. Hartwell; resigned. John R. Simpson; wounded at Sharpsburg; relieved. Arthur Robbins; wounded.

Macon - W.G. Swanson; till re-organized. Rob't L. Mayes; killed at Seven Pines. Chas. J. Bryan; wounded at Malvern Hill; resigned. Wm. Thomas Bilbro; killed at Spottsylvania. T. Alexander Etheridge; wounded.

Macon - Richard H. Powell; promoted. E. Troup Randall; wounded at Chancellorsville; retired. John R. McGowan; wounded at Spottsylvania.

Mobile - Archibald Gracie; resigned. John F. Chester; wounded at Seven Pines; died of wounds received at Winchester. John T. Huggins.

Montgomery - F.W. Hunter; resigned. Watkins Phelan; wounded at Seven Pines; killed at Petersburg. W.A. McBryde.

Montgomery - W.G. Andrews. (Company transferred to artillery at the close of the first year's service).

Lowndes - M. Ford Bonham; wounded at Gettysburg, and Winchester.

Coosa and Autauga - Edward S. Ready; wounded at Seven Pines; wounded and captured at Boonsboro; detached and promoted. Louis H. Hill; resigned. B.F.K. Melton.

Mobile - Louis T. Woodruff; resigned. John K. Hoyt; detached. George H. Dunlap.

Lowndes and Montgomery (1862) - Cornelius Robinson, jr.

Macon (1862) - J.L.W. Jelks; died at Richmond. Richmond W.H. Kennon; wounded at Malvern Hill; retired. Francis M. Germany; wounded at Gettysburg; retired. Robert T. Rutherford.

Fourth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Dalton, Georgia, May 2, 1861, and proceeded at once to Virginia. Mustered into service for twelve months at Lynchburg, May 7, it proceeded to Harper's Ferry. It soon after fell back to Winchester, where it became part of Gen. B. E. Bee's Brigade - of which the 2nd and 11th Mississippi, 1st Tennessee, and 6th North Carolina were the other regiments. Moved to Manassas Junction, the regiment took a prominent part in that conflict, losing 38 killed and 208 wounded out of a total of about 750 engaged. Gen. Bee, killed at Manassas, was succeeded by Gen. W.H.C. Whiting. The Fourth wintered at Dumfries, re-enlisted for three years in January 1862, re-organized in April, and about that time moved over to the vicinity of Norfolk. It was engaged both days at Seven Pines, losing 8 killed and 19 wounded. A fortnight later, the brigade was sent to the Valley, but came back with Jackson's corps a few days after. It was hotly engaged at Cold Harbor, losing 22 killed and 108 wounded out of 500 present; and lost slightly at Malvern Hill. Moving northward with the army, the Fourth participated at the second Manassas, losing 20 killed, and 43 wounded. At Boonsboro the loss was slight, and at Sharpsburg 8 were killed, and 36 wounded. After this campaign Gen. Law was assigned to the permanent command of the brigade which was shortly after organized with the Fourth, Fifteenth, Forty-fourth, Forty-seventh, and Forty-eight Alabama regiments as its complement. The Fourth was engaged at Fredericksburg, losing 5 killed, and 17 wounded. It lost slightly in the brilliant fight at Suffolk, and soon after took up the line of march for Maryland. It passed into Pennsylvania, and was engaged in the assault at Gettysburg, with a loss of 15 killed, and 72 wounded and missing. In the fall the Fourth moved with Longstreet's corps, and took part at Chicamauga, with a loss of 14 killed, and 54 wounded out of about 3000 engaged. It moved with the corps into east Tennessee, and in the attack on Knoxville lost 5 killed, and 24 wounded. Rejoining the army in Virginia, the Fourth was hotly engaged, and lost 15 killed, and 58 wounded at the battle of the Wilderness out of about 250 engaged, and 4 killed and 11 wounded at Spottsylvania. It took part in all the operations to the second Cold Harbor, where its loss was slight. Then, for nearly ten months, it lay behind the defences of Petersbrug, taking part in the various movements and assaults, losing 10 killed, and 30 wounded during the time. It surrendered 202 men at Appomattox, Gen. Perry of Macon having been in command of the brigade for nearly a year. Of 1422 men on its rolls, about 240 perished in battle, nearly 100 died of disease, and 408 were discharged or transferred.

Field and Staff.

Colonels - Egbert J. Jones of Madison; killed at the first Manassas. Evander M. Law of Macon; promoted. Pinckney D. Bowles* of Conecuh.

Lieutenant Colonels - E.M. Law; promoted. Thomas J. Goldsby of Dallas; wounded at Cold Harbor; resigned. Owen K. McLemore of Chambers; killed at Boonsboro. P.D. Bowles; promoted. L. Houston Scruggs of Madison; wounded at Chicamauga.

Majors - Charles L. Scott of Wilcox; wounded at Manassas; resigned. P.D. Bowles; promoted. L.H. Scruggs; promoted. Thomas K. Coleman of Perry; killed at Chicamauga. W.M. Robbins of Perry; wounded at Wilderness.

Adjutant - Robert T. Coles of Madison; wounded at Gaines' Mill.

Captains, and Counties from Which Companies Came.

Dallas - Thomas J. Goldsby; promoted. R.V. Kidd; killed at Chicamauga. J.M. West; wounded at Hanover Junction.

Macon 0 T.B.Dryer; till re-organized. E.J. Glass; resigned. Bayless E. Brown; killed at Wilderness.

Dallas - N.H.R. Dawson; till re-organized. Alfred C. Price; killed at Cold Harbor. M.D. Sterret; wounded at Malvern Hill; retired. F.C. Robbin; wounded at Malvern Hill; retired. F.C. Robbins; wounded at Cold Harbor; wounded and captured at Knoxville.

Perry and Marengo - Richard Clarke; till re-organized. Thomas K. Coleman; promoted. James T. Jones; wounded at Wilderness.

Conecuh - P.D. Bowles; promoted. William Lee; killed at Malvern Hill. J.W. Darby; wounded at Wilderness.

Madison - G.B. Mastin; killed at Seven Pines. W.W. Leftwich; killed at Gettysburg. James H. Brown; wounded at Wilderness.

Perry - Porter King; till re-organized. Wm M. Robbins; promoted. H.H. Moseley; wounded and captured at Knoxville.

Lauderdale - Robert McFarland; till re-organized. H. Armistead; killed at the first Cold Harbor. W.F. Karsner.

Madison - Edward D. Tracy; transferred and promoted. L. Houston Scruggs; wounded at Malvern Hill, and Sharpsburg; promoted. Walter Harris; died in the service.

Jackson - R.B. Linsey; killed at first Manassas. J.D. Ogilvie; died in the service. James H. Young; till re-organized. W.H. Robinson; wounded at Cold Harbor; retired. James Sullivan; killed at Sharpsburg. James Keith; killed at Fredericksburg. A. Murray; killed at Petersburg. .... McIver.

* This officer did not receive his commission as brigadier, but in the closing days of the war he was appointed to the command of five regiments, and a full brigade staff reported to him. Born in Edgefield district, S.C., in 1838, Pinckney Downie Bowles was educated at the military academy in Charleston, and the University of Virginia. He read law under Gen. McGowan at Abbeville, and located in Conecuh County, this state, to practice in 1859. He was there engaged at the beginning of the war. His military record is the history of the Fourth Alabama Infantry, of which he was the brave and faithful commander. He is now a practitioner of law at Evergreen, Conecuh County.

Fifth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

The Fifth Infantry was organized at Montgomery, May 5, 1861, and at once moved to Pensacola. A few days after, it proceeded to Virginia, and took post near Manassas Junction in the brigade of Gen. Ewell. It was in the skirmish at Farr's X Roads, and was on the field but not engaged at the first Manassas. It remained in the vicinity of Manassas during the fall and winter, and Gen. Rodes became the brigade commander in October - the Sixth and Twelfth of Alabama, and the Twelfth of Mississippi, being the other regiments of the brigade. Moving with the army to Yorktown in March 1862, it there re-enlisted and re-organized. It was under fire at Yorktown, and was on the field at Williamsburg. At Seven Pines the regiment received its baptism of blood, losing 27 killed and 128 wounded. The regiment was hotly engaged at Cold Harbor and Malvern Hill, losing 15 killed and 58 wounded. It was not at the second Manassas battle, but moved into Maryland, and shared in the stubborn conflicts at Boonsboro and Sharpsburg, losing 11 killed and 39 wounded out of the remnant present for duty. It was in line of battle on the crest, and saw Burnside's bloody repulse at Fredericksburg; and at Chancellorsville it was in the invincible line under Rodes that swept everything before it; reaping its brightest renown, and losing heavily. It moved into Maryland and Pennsylvania on the Gettysburg campaign, and its loss was very severe in that battle. Having wintered at Orange C.H., the Fifth, now reduced to a mere skeleton, participated in the battles of the Wilderness and Spottsylvania, and without severe loss. It took part in the subsequent operations as the lines began to be drawn around Petersburg, losing slightly at the second Cold Harbor. It went with Early into the Valley and across the Potomac, taking part in numerous engagements with the foe, and losing severely at Winchester. It soon after took its place in the memorable trenches of Petersburg, and wintered there. Only 25 or 30 men were around its colors when they were surrendered at Appomattox, under Capt. Riley. Of 1719 names on its rolls, nearly 300 perished in battle, 240 others died in the service, and 507 were discharged or transferred.

Field and Staff

Colonels - Robert E. Rodes of Tuskaloosa; promoted. Allen C. Jones of Greene; till reorganized. Christopher C. Pegues of Dallas; killed at first Cold Harbor. Josephus Hall of Clarke; wounded at Spottsylvania; resigned. Edwin LaFayette Hobson of Greene.

Lieutenant Colonels - Allen C. Jones; promoted. John T. Morgan of Dallas; resigned. Josephus Hall; promoted. Edwin L. Hobson; promoted. Eugene Blackford of Barbour.

Majors - John T. Morgan; promoted. H.A. Whiting of Tuskaloosa; transferred to Gen. Rodes' staff. E.L. Hobson; promoted. Eugene Blackford; promoted.

Adjutants - H.A. Whiting; promoted. Robert I. Smith of Mobile; till re-organized. Charles J. Pegues of Dallas.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Tuskaloosa - Wm H. Fowler. (Company transferred to artillery at the close of the first year's service).

Greene - E.L. Hobson; promoted. J.W. Williams; captured at Boonsboro.

Pickens - Syd. H. Ferguson; till re-organization. T.C. Belsher; wounded.

Sumter - John H. Dent; till re-organized. N.R.E. Ferguson; killed at Wilderness. James H. Holmes.

Sumter - Rob't P. Blount; resigned. Jas. V. Tutt; wounded at Seven Pines. George Reed; killed near Winchester.

Dallas - C.C. Pegues; promoted. E.B. Moseley.

Clarke - Josephus Hall; promoted. S.M. Woodward.

Monroe - Giles Goode; died in the service. T.J. Riley.

Talladega - Charles M. Shelley; resigned. William T. Renfro; killed at Chancellorsville. N.S. McAfee.

Barbour - Eugene Blackford; promoted. L.S. Chitwood.

Lowndes (1862) - D.W. Johnson; killed at Cold Harbor. Thomas S. Herbert; resigned. John M. Gilchrist; killed at second Cold Harbor.

Sixth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

The Sixth Infantry organized at Montgomery, May 6, 1861, with twelve companies, and about 1400 men. It was first ordered to Corinth, and from there went to Virginia. Reaching Manassas Junction, it was brigaded under Gen. Ewell. It was on the field, but not actively engaged in the first Manassas, and passed the fall and winter in that vicinity. General Rodes succeeded Ewell in command of the brigade. In the spring it moved to Yorktown with the army, and there re-organized, and re-enlisted for the war. It was on the field at Williamsburg, but not under fire. At Seven Pines the regiment took a prominent part, suffering terribly, losing 102 killed, and 282 wounded out of about 650 engaged; while the brigade lost 1296 out of about 2500. Its mutilated columns again took a conspicuous part at Mechanicsville, Cold Harbor and Malvern Hill, and suffered very severely. It was in the advance in the movement across the Potomac, and lost slightly at Boonsboro; but at Sharpsburg was severely cut up, the loss being 52 killed and 104 wounded. The regiment was present, but did not take part at Fredericksburg. With its brigade companions - the Third, Fifth, Twelfth , and Twenty-sixth - Col. O'Neal commanding them, the regiment was in the victorious wave of battle at Chancellorsville, and again its ranks were thinned by its losses. It shared the perils of the Pennsylvania campaign, when Gen. Battle led the brigade, and in the fierce shock on the rocky slopes of Gettysburg it suffered frightfully. Having wintered near Orange Courthouse, the regiment was at the Wilderness, where it lost considerably; and was badly mutilated at Spottsylvania. It took part in the Valley campaign of Gen. Early, and suffered severely at Winchester; and lost a number captured at Cedar Creek. Moving back to Petersburg, it was placed in Fort Mahone, and was almost continuously under fire till its colors were folded at Appomatox; its number present being about 80 men under Lieut. Col. Culver. Of 2109 names on its rolls, nearly 400 perished in battle, 243 died of disease in the service, and 675 were discharged or transferred.

Field and Staff

Colonels - John J. Seibels of Montgomery; till re-organized. John B. Gordon of Jackson; wounded at Sharpsburg; promoted. James N. Lightfoot of Henry; wounded at Chancellorsville and Spottsylvania.

Lieutenant Colonels - Benjamin H. Baker of Russell; resigned. John B. Gordon; promoted. James J. Willingham of Lowndes; killled at Seven Pines. James N. Lightfoot; wounded at Sharpsburg; promoted. A.M. Gordon of Jackson; killed at Chancellorsville. George W. Hooper of Russell; disabled by accident; retired. Isaac F. Culver of Henry; wounded at Winchester.

Majors - John B. Gordon; promoted. S. Perry Nesmith of Lowndes; killed at Seven Pines. A.M. Gordon; promoted. George W. Hooper; promoted. Isaac F. Culver; wounded at Sharpsburg; promoted.

Adjutants - George Goldthwaite, Jr. of Montgomery; resigned. .... Pace of Georgia; transferred. John Whit Thomas of Henry; killed at Spottsylvania. Edgar Watson of Montgomery; killed at Farmville.

Captains, and Counties from Which Companies Came.

Henry - Alexander C. Gordon; resigned. James N. Lightfoot; promoted. Isaac F. Culver; wounded at Boonsboro; promoted. Thomas Lightfoot; killed at Winchester.

Lowndes - James J. Willingham; elected lieutenant colonel. M.L. Bowie; wounded at Sharpsburg and Spottsylvania; retired.

Montgomery - Gabriel DuVal; resigned. M.L. Kirkpatrick; till re-organized. Mathew Fox; killed at Seven Pines. John W. Burton; wounded and captured at Gettysburg. Lieut. Wat. Waller commanded.

Macon - John M. Kennedy; till re-organization. W.D. Rowe; wounded at Winchester.

Russell - James F. Waddell; till re-organization; Augustus S. Flournoy; killed at Seven Pines. R.M. Greene; wounded at Wilderness and Winchester.

Montgomery - S.G. Hardaway; till re-organization. John B. McCarthy; killed at Seven Pines. John Lawler; resigned.

Wilcox - George Lynch; till re-organization. Julius A. Kimbrough; wounded at Gettysburg.

Autauga - Thomas A. Davis; appointed surgeon. Wm. F. Davis; resigned. Green H. Thompson.

Jackson - Wm.T. Gunter; till re-organized. W.C. Hunt; wounded at Seven Pines and Gettysburg; killed at Cedar Creek.

Jackson - Wm.L. Gordon; till re-organization. A.M. Gordon; wounded at Seven Pines; promoted.

Henry - T.T. Smith; resigned. Thomas Bell; killed at Seven Pines.

Russell - Walter H. Weems; till re-organized. George W. Hooper; promoted. N.S. Black.

Seventh Alabama

Infantry Regiment

The Seventh organized at Pensacola, May 18, 1861, with eight infantry and two mounted companies. It was composed of twelve months' men, of companies that rendezvoused at that place. It remained on duty there till November, when it was ordered to Chattanooga, and a month later to Bowling Green. It was in a temporary brigade under Col. S.A.M. Wood, and fell back with the army to Corinth. The time of service of most of the companies expired the first week in April 1862, and it disbanded, though the company from Montgomery and Autauga, and other men of the regiment, fought at Shiloh. The mass of the men went at once into other organizations, and rendered efficient service therein.

Field Officers.

Colonel - Sterling A.M. Wood of Lauderdale; promoted.

Lieutenant Colonel - John G. Coltart of Madison.

Major - A.A. Russell of Jackson.

Adjutant - Simeon Dean of Chambers; promoted. S.A. McClung of Madison; transferred to Gen. Wood's staff.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Chambers - James M. Jackson; resigned. Flavius J. Graham.

Calhoun - Robert W. Draper.

Cherokee - William H. Clare.

Madison - Oliver B. Gaston.

Barbour - P. Bludworth.

Butler and Pike - William T. McCall.

Jackson - J.B. Ragsdale; resigned. Flavius J. Graham.

Wilcox and Dallas - Thomas G. Jenkins. (Mounted.)

Montgomery and Autauga - Jesse J. Cox. (Mounted.)

Lauderdale - William H. Price.

Eighth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This was the first Alabama command that enlisted "for the war." It was organized by the appointment of its field officers by the war department. The regiment lay at Yorktown, Virginia, the first eleven months of its service, and a detachment of it was engaged in a skirmish near Winn's Mill. Placed in Gen. Pryor's brigade, the regiment fell back with the army till the enemy overtook it at Williamsburg. It won its first laurels on that fiercely-contested field, losing about 100 men. At Seven Pines it was again under the most deadly fire, and its loss was 32 killed, 80 wounded, and 32 missing. Now in the brigade of Gen. Wilcox, --with the Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, and Fourteenth Alabama regiments-- the Eighth was under fire at Mechanicsville, and took part in the desperate assault of Longstreet's division on the enemy's position at Gaines' Mill, and emerged victoriously from the bloody combat with the loss of half of the 350 men it had engaged. Three days later, the regiment was in the line of assault at Frazier's Farm, where it met Meagher's Irish brigade, and of 180 effective men, only 90 were at regimental muster the next morning. Its ranks soon began to fill up, and the Eighth marched with the army towards the Potomac. At the second battle of Manassas it was under a destructive fire, and lost about 60 men, but was held in reserve. The regiment took part in the capture of Harper's Ferry, then crossed the river and fought obstinately at Sharpsburg, where it lost 67 killed and wounded. It wintered at Rappahannock, and lost slightly at Fredericksburg. At Salem Church, Wilcox's brigade of Alabamians, of which it was part, bore the brunt of the federal assault, and drove them back in confusion, capturing 1500 prisoners; the Eighth losing 58 men killed and wounded. It was in the exultant army that Lee led into Maryland the second time, and its colors were flouted in the face of death at Gettysburg; where of 420 engaged, 260 were left on the bloody field. With the army it re-crossed the Potomac, and wintered in the vicinity of Orange C.H. The regiment was again hotly engaged at the Wilderness, losing heavily, and at Spottsylvania suffered considerably. It was under fire nearly every day as the federal army pressed up to Richmond, and its loss was severe at the second Cold Harbor. At Petersburg the Eighth again suffered largely. It fought the cavalry raid on the Weldon Railroad, and participated in the capture of the "Crater." At Deep Bottom the regiment participated with some loss, and lost heavily in the attempt to dislodge the enemy from their position on the Weldon Railroad. The regiment assisted at the repulse of the foe on the plank road below Petersburg, and fought cheerfully on the retreat up the James. At Appomattox the remnant indignantly denied the first rumors of the contemplated surrender, many wept like children at the announcement, and the survivors tore their battle-rent banner into shreds to retain as a memento. Of 1377 men on its roll, the Eighth had 300 killed or mortally wounded, over 170 died of disease, and 236 were discharged or transferred.

Field and Staff.

Colonels - John A. Winston of Sumter; resigned. Young L. Royston of Perry; wounded at Frazier's Farm and Salem Church; retired. Hillary A. Herbert of Butler.

Lieutenant Colonels - John W. Frazier of Tennessee; resigned. Thomas E. Irby of Dallas; killed at Williamsburg. Y.L. Royston; promoted. H.A. Herbert; wounded at Sharpsburg and Wilderness; promoted. John P. Emerich of Mobile; wounded at Petersburg.

Majors - Thomas E. Irby; promoted. Y.L. Royston; promoted. H.A. Herbert; wounded and captured at Seven Pines; promoted. John P. Emerich; wounded at Gaines' Mill; promoted. Duke Nall of Perry; died of wounds received at Wilderness.

Adjutants - Thomas Phelan of Perry; transferred to line. Dan Jones of Dallas; wounded at Frazier's Farm; transferred and promoted. Morgan S. Cleveland of Dallas; wounded at Petersburg.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Perry - Young L. Royston; promoted. Thomas Phelan; killed at Gaines' Mill. Thos. Heard; wounded at Wilderness.

Dallas - James Kent; resigned. Robert T. McCrary; killed at Salem. W.R. Knox; wounded at Petersburg.

Perry - Duke Nall; wounded at Sharpsburg; promoted. W.L. Fagan.

Butler - Hillary A. Herbert; promoted. Lewis A. Livingston; wounded at Gettysburg, and died in the hands of the enemy. Ira W. Stott.

Mobile - Thomas Smith; resigned. C.E. Blackwood; wounded at Frazier's Farm; resigned. A.H. Ravesies; wounded at Sharpsburg.

Mobile - Charles Ketchum; resigned. Leonard F Summers; killed at Seven Pines. Benj. Briggs; resigned. Henry McHugh; killed at Petersburg Crater.

Mobile - J.P. Emerich; promoted. A. Kohler; wounded and captured at Gettysburg.

Mobile - Patrick Loughry; killed at Seven Pines. C.P. Brannegan; killed at Gettysburg. John McGrath; wounded at Wilderness and Spottsylvania.

Coosa - T.W.W. Davies; resigned. G.W. Hannon; killed at Gaines' Mill. M.E. McWilliams; died in the service. J.T.L. Robinson; wounded at Petersburg.

Ninth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Richmond, Virginia, the latter part of May 1861, and moved to Winchester several weeks later. It was there brigaded under Gen. Kirby Smith of Florida, but failed to reach the battlefield of Manassas because of a railroad accident. The regiment lay at Manassas centerville till March 1862, when it marched to Yorktown. Gen. J.H. Forney of Calhoun succeeded to the command of the brigade, and was relieved by Gen. Wilcox in January. The regiment was under fire at Yorktown, with slight loss. It participated in the battle of Williamsburg, but the loss was not severe. At Seven Pines it was held in reserve, and did not suffer. It was now brigaded with the Eighth, Tenth, Eleventh, and Fourteenth Alabama regiments, still under Gen. Wilcox. At Gaines' Mill the regiment sustained severe loss, and was rent and torn by the wall of fire at Frazier's Farm. With the army it took up the line of March for Maryland, and was under fire but not actively engaged at the second Manassas. It was part of the investing force at Harper's Ferry, and hastened from there to the field of Sharpsburg, where it lost 8 killed, 42 wounded, and 9 missing. The Ninth wintered on the Rappahannock, and was under fire, with few casualties, at Fredericksburg. Its brightest renown was won at Salem, where it bore the brunt of a successful assault, and lost very heavily. The regiment moved into Pennsylvania, and sustained severe loss at Gettysburg, where the brigade had 781 killed and wounded. The fall and winter were passed in camp, near Orange C.H., and the Ninth participated in the fierce struggles at the Wilderness, and at Appomattox, with severe loss in each battle. Gen. Sanders of Greene then took command of the brigade. The fighting was almost continuous for several weeks, culminating in the terrible repulse of the invading army at the second battle of Cold Harbor, in which the Ninth shared without severe loss. From June till the end - nine weary months - the regiment was in the trenches of Petersburg, or engaged in the majority of the numerous and bloody battles that relieved the monotony of the last, long, and desperate collision of the great rival armies that had so long struggled on Virginia soil. A remnant of the Ninth surrendered at Appomattox, the brigade having been in command of Gen.W.H. Forney of Calhoun for some months. Of 1138 men on its rolls, about 200 fell in battle, over 175 died of disease and 208 were discharged or transferred.

Field and Staff

Colonels - Cadmus M. Wilcox of Tennessee; promoted. Samuel Henry of Marshall; resigned. Horace King of Morgan; wounded at Gettysburg.

Lieutenant Colonels - Samuel Henry; promoted. Edward A. O'Neal of Lauderdale; transferred. Gaines Smith of Limestone.

Majors - E.A. O'Neal; promoted. Jere Williams of Jackson; resigned. James M. Crow of Lauderdale.

Adjutants - John Burtwell of Lauderdale; transferred. John Featherston of Limestone; transferred to line. James W. Wilson; killed at Sharpsburg. William Holcombe of Limestone; captured at Petersburg.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Mobile - F.H. Ripley; resigned. W.C. Murphy; wounded and captured at Williamsburg; killed at Salem. A.H. Hays.

Jackson and Marshall - Jere Williams; promoted. Blake Moore; resigned. Elias Jacobs; wounded at Gettysburg; retired. Patrick Seward; captured.

Limestone - Thomas H. Hobbs; killed at Gaines' Mill. John Featherston; wounded at Gettysburg.

Butler - E.Y. Hill; killed at Gaines' Mill. Thomas Mills; resigned. Mathew Patton.

Lauderdale - D.W. Gills; killed at Williamsburg. John Chisholm; captured at Gettysburg; died at Fort Delaware. B.F. Taylor; wounded at Sharpsburg; captured at Petersburg.

Marshall - James L. Sheffield; resigned. John Rayburn; killed at Sharpsburg. A.W. Ledbetter; wounded at Salem and Sharpsburg.

Lawrence - James M. Warren; resigned. M.G, May; wounded at Sharpsburg.

Morgan - Horace King; promoted. Wm. Todd; retired.

Limestone - David Houston; resigned. Gaines Smith; captured at Gettysburg; promoted.

Tenth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Montgomery, June 4, 1861, and went to Virginia a month later. When it arrived at Winchester it was brigaded under Gen. E.K. Smith, with the Ninth and Eleventh Alabama, Nineteenth Mississippi, and Thirty-eighth Virginia. It saw no active service for several months, and lay near Manassas and centerville, with Gen. Wilcox in command of the brigade. It was doing some detached duty when attacked at Drainsville, where it lost 21 killed and 64 wounded. The regiment marched to the peninsula, and was shelled at Yorktown. It fought at Williamsburg, and there lost 85 killed and wounded. Held in reserve at Seven Pines, it suffered lightly. The Tenth took a conspicuous part in the battles of Gaines' Mill and Frazier's Farm, and emerged from these terrible conflicts with a loss of over 200 men killed and wounded. It was at the second battle of Manassas and about 30 of its men fell on that sanguinary field. Under fire at Harper's Ferry, it marched rapidly to Sharpsburg, and of the 200 men with which it entered the battle, over half were left dead or wounded there. During the winter of 1862-'3, the Tenth was on the Rappahannock, and saw some active duty, suffering lightly at Hazel River and Fredericksburg. It sustained the shock of Sedgewick's corps at Salem, and of its 400 men engaged, 120 were killed and wounded while the brigade lost 441 casualties, and that exact number of the enemy's dead were counted in its front. In the harvest that death reaped at Gettysburg were 175 of the men of this regiment killed or wounded, of 450 engaged. The Tenth spent the winter of 1863-'4 near Orange C.H., and was hotly engaged at the Wilderness and Spottsylvania, losing about 50 killed and wounded in the former, and about 60 in the latter, battle. It participated at the second conflict at Cold Harbor, where it lost about 20 killed and wounded. In the months of August and June, 1864, the Tenth took part in the fierce struggles around Petersburg, suffering severely in the majority of them. At Hatcher's Run it lost 15 or 20 disabled, and about 30 at High Bridge and Farmville, on the retreat to Appomattox. There the regiment furled its colors forever, ten commisioned officers and 208 men being present. Of 1429 names on its rolls, nearly 300 fell in battle or died of wounds, about 180 died of disease, and 249 were discharged or transferred.

Field and Staff

Colonels - John H. Forney of Calhoun; wounded at Drainesville; promoted. John J. Woodward of Talladega; killed at Gaines' Mill. Wm. H. Forney of Calhoun; wounded at Gettysburg; promoted. Wm. T. Smith of St. Clair.

Lieutenant Colonels - James B. Martin of Talladega; killed at Drainesville. John J. Woodward; promoted. Wm. H. Forney; wounded and captured at Williamsburg; promoted. John H. Caldwell of St. Clair; resigned. James E. Shelley of Talladega; wounded at Spottsylvania; killed at Petersburg. Wm. T. Smith of St. Clair; promoted. Lewis W. Johnson.

Majors - Taul Bradford of Talladega; resigned. John W. Woodward; promoted. Wm. H. Forney; promoted. John H. Caldwell; promoted. James D. Truss of St. Clair; promoted. L.W. Johnson; promoted.

Adjutants - James B. Martin of Talladega; wounded at Frazier's Farm; resigned. James E. Shelley; transferred to line. George P. Brown of Talladega; killed at Petersburg. J.M. Renfro of Calhoun; transferred to line. B.T. Sides of Talladega.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

St. Clair - John H. Caldwell; promoted. Wilson L. Brewster; resigned. Samuel A. Wyatt; resigned. Leroy F. Box.

Jefferson - Alburto Martin; wounded at the second Manassas; resigned. Wm. A. McMillion; wounded at Gettysburg; resigned. Thomas J. Hickman; wounded at High Bridge.

Shelby - Rufus W. Cobb; resigned.William Lee; killed at Gaines' Mill. Lieut. J.T. Wilson commanded for some time.

Calhoun - Franklin Woodruff; resigned. Richard C. Ragan; killed at Spottsylvania. Frank M. Allen; resigned. Lieut. Thomas H. Martin commanded for some time.

Talladega - John J. Woodward; promoted. Walter Cook; killed at Salem. James E. Shelley; promoted. W.W. Draper.

St. Clair - James D. Truss; promoted. Wm. T. Smith; wounded at Spottsylvania and Petersburg; promoted. B.F. Sides.

Calhoun - Wm. H. Forney; wounded at Drainesville; promoted. George C. Whatley; killed at Sharpsburg. Jas. B. Farmer; wounded at Gaines' Mill; resigned. John A. Cobb; wounded at Wilderness; resigned. James M. Renfro; wounded at Ream's Station. Lieut. T.J. Walker command for some time.

Calhoun - Woodford R. Hanna; resigned. Pickens W. Black; killed at first Cold Harbor. A.T. Martin.

DeKalb - Abner A. Hughes; resigned. Robert W. Cowan; killed at Gaines' Mill. L.E. Hamlin; wounded at Sharpsburg; resigned. Simeon G. Yeargin; wounded at Gettysburg. Lieut. Thomas Christian commanded for some time.

Talladega - J.C. McKenzie; wounded at Frazier's Farm; John Oden; wounded at Sharpsburg; resigned. Henry N. Coleman; killed at Petersburg. S.J. Morris.

Eleventh Alabama

Infantry Regiment

The Eleventh was enlisted June 17, 1861, at Lynchburg, Va., with 972 men, rank and file, though several of the companies had been in camp for two or three months. Proceeding to Virginia, it reached Winchester in July, and was brigaded under Gen. E.K. Smith of Florida. It remained between Alexandria and Centreville, and near Manassas, till the army moved over to Yorktown. Gen. J.H. Forney of Calhoun had been in temporary command of the brigade, and was succeeded during the winter by Gen. Wilcox. The regiment fell back to Richmond, and was first under fire at Seven Pines, where it lost 9 killed and 49 wounded. It charged the enemy in a strong position at Gaines' Mill, and in a few minutes lost 27 killed and 129 wounded. But it was at Frazier's farm, three days after, that the Eleventh, and other regiments of the brigade, charged across an open field and engaged in a bloody struggle over the enemy's batteries, wherein the bayonet was the chief weapon, and where it lost the commanding officers of eight companies, and a total of 182 killed and wounded. The regiment was under fire at the second battle of Manassas, and lost 25 killed and wounded. It was part of the investing force at Harper's Ferry, and hastened to Sharpsburg, where it was engaged with a loss of thirty-five killed and wounded. It wintered at Rappahannock, and was exposed at Fredericksburg, where the casualties were 12 killed and wounded. As part of Wilcox's brigade, it fought Sedgwick at Salem, where it lost 117 killed and wounded. With the army, it moved into Pennsylvania, and was badly cut up at Gettysburg. The command wintered near Orange Courthouse 1863-4, and tried to gather strength for the last great struggle. At the Wilderness and Spottsylvania the regiment was at close quarters with the foe, and lost about 65 men. Gen. Sanders of Greene was now in command of the brigade. From the Wilderness to Petersburg almost constant skirmishing occurred, and from June 22 to June 30, the loss was about 80 killed and wounded. The Eleventh was in the column that retook the line broken at the "Crater", losing about 40 men, and from August 16 to October 17, which includes the effort to retake the Weldon Railroad, the loss in killed, wounded, and captured was 76. It fought at Burgess' Mill, with severe loss, and was sternly confronting the foe at Appomattox when astounded by the news of the surrender. There were only about 125 of the regiment present there for duty, Capt. Stewart of Pickens commanding. Of 1192 names on its muster roll, over 270 fell in battle, about 200 died of disease, 170 were discharged, and 80 were transferred.

Field and Staff

Colonels - Sydenham Moore of Greene; mortally wounded at Seven Pines. J.C.C. Sanders of Greene; wounded at Gettysburg; promoted. George E. Tayloe of Marengo.

Lieutenant Colonels - Stephen F. Hale of Greene; killed at Gaines' Mill. George E. Tayloe of Marengo.

Majors - Isham W. Garrott of Perry; resigned. Archibald Gracie of Mobile; resigned. George Fields of Greene; resigned. Richard J. Fletcher of Washington; disabled at Gettysburg; retired.

Adjutants - Holcombe of Marengo; transferred to line. Walter E. Winn of Marengo; transferred to staff duty. R.Y. Ashe of Marengo; killed near Petersburg. C. Watlington of Marengo.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Cames.

Marengo - Young M. Moody of Marengo; resigned. .... Holcombe; killed at Frazier's farm. John B. Rains.

Greene - George Fields; promoted. William Bratton; killed at Frazier's Farm. George Clark.

Greene - J.C.C. Sanders; wounded at Frazier's Farm. B.T. Higginbotham; wounded at Salem; resigned. R.M. Kennedy; wounded at Petersburg.

Marengo - George E. Tayloe; promoted. John H. Prince.

Washington and Clarke - R.J. Fletcher; promoted. John James; killed at second Cold Harbor.

Bibb - James L. Davidson; resigned. .... Cadell; killed at Petersburg. Zachariah Abney.

Tuskaloosa - James McMath; killed at Frazier's Farm. John B. Hughes; wounded.

Pickens - Reuben Chapman; resigned. M.L. Stewart.

Fayette - .... Trawick; removed. .... Bell; killed at Frazier's Farm. .... Harris; killed at the Crater.

Perry - Henry Talbird; resigned. Mat. M. England; died in the service. Walter C. Y. Parker; mortally wounded at Frazier's Farm. James L. Brazelton; killed at Petersburg. Edward R. Lucas.

The Twelfth Alabama was organized at Richmond in July1861, and at once moved to the Potomac "front." It was first brigaded under Gen. Ewell of Virginia, who was soon after succeeded by Gen. Rodes of Tuskaloosa. The regiment lay near Manassas during the fall and winter, and moved to Yorktown in the spring of 1862. It was under fire there, and suffered lightly at Williamsburg. At Seven Pines the regiment was in the advance that opened the battle, and stormed the redoubt held by Casey's division, carrying three lines of works by succesive charges, and losing 70 killed and 141 wounded - more than half it had engaged. It participated to some extent in the other battles before Richmond, and mustered 120 men for duty after the battle of Malvern Hill. Still under Rodes, and in D. H. Hill's division, and brigaded with the Third, Fifth, Sixth, and Twenty-sixth Alabama regiments, the Twelfth was in the advance into Maryland. It bore a conspicuous part at Boonsboro, and also at Sharpsburg, losing in these bloody conflicts 27 killed, 69 wounded, and 33 missing out its thinned ranks. Retiring into Virginia with the army, the regiment wintered on the Rappahannock. It was under fire but not actively engaged at Fredericksburg; but it was in the resistless column of Rodes at Chancellorsville, where Col. O'Neal led the brigade, and where the Twelfth charged three lines of breastworks, and was badly mutilated. It skirmished at Brandy Station, and again led the way over the Potomac. At Gettysburg it was on the extreme left, and pressed the enemy in confusion through the town, then supported the grand assault, and afterwards covered the rear. After the army retired into Virginia, the Twelfth was engaged in several skirmishes - at Warrenton Springs, Turkey Run &c. The winter was passed near Orange C.H., and the regiment - Gen. Battle now commanding the brigade - was hotly engaged at the Wilderness and Spottsylvania, and in the continuous skirmishing of Grant's advance movement to Cold Harbor. The Twelfth then again marched into Maryland when Early threatened Washington. It participated at Winchester with very severe loss, and in the further operations of the corps in the Valley. On its return to Petersburg it took part - now in the Gordon's corps - in the fierce struggles around that historic city, and laid down its arms at Appomattox. Of the original number of 1196, about 50 were at Appomattox; and of the 321 recruits received, about 70 were there. Nearly 250 died of wounds received in battle, about 200 died of disease, and 202 were discharged. The battle-flag of the regiment is now in Mobile.

Field and Staff

Colonels - Robert T. Jones of Perry; killed at Seven Pines. B.B. Gayle of Morgan; killed at Boonsboro. Samuel B. Pickens of South Carolina; wounded at Spottsylvania and Winchester.

Lieutenant Colonels - Theodore O'Hara of Kentucky; transferred. B.B. Gayle; promoted. Samuel B. Pickens; wounded at Boonsboro; promoted. J.C. Goodgame of Coosa.

Majors - E.D. Tracy of Madison; transferred. John C. Brown of Coffee; resigned. B.B. Gayle; promoted. Samuel B. Pickens; promoted. John C. Goodgame; promoted. Adolph Proskauer of Mobile; wounded at Chancellorsville and Spottsylvania.

Adjutants - Samuel B. Pickens; promoted. Junius L. Walthall of Mobile; transferred. L. Gayle of Virginia.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Cames.

Mobile - George Heuilly; till re-organized. Jule L'Etondal; died in the service. T.H. Rogers; wounded at Winchester.

Coosa - Joseph H. Bradford; till re-organized. John C. Goodgame; promoted. Henry W. Cox; killed at Chancellorsville. Patrick Thomas; killed at Appomattox.

Mobile - Augustus Stykes; resigned. A. Proskauer; promoted. F.C. Fischer. E. Karcher.

Coffee - John C. Brown; promoted. T.C. Horn; resigned. E. Tucker; killed at Sharpsburg. .... Davis. killed at Gettysburg. J. McCassells; killed at the Wilderness.

Dekalb - W. Higgins; resigned. R.F. Patterson; resigned. W.L. Maroney; resigned; John Rogersl killed at Spottyslvania. A. Majors; killed at Snicker's Gap.

Macon - R.F. Ligon; till re-organized. Robert H. Keeling; killed at Seven Pines. J.W. McNeeley; wounded at Chancellorsville transferred. Robert E. Park; wounded at Gettysburg; wounded and captured at Winchester.

Jackson - A.S. Bibb; till re-organized. P.D. Ross wounded at Gettysburg.

Morgan - B.B. Gayle; promoted. C.A. Darwin; killed at Seven Pines. A.E. Hewlett; wounded and captured at Winchester.

Mobile - W.T. Walthall; transferred. John J. Nicholson; wounded at Seven Pines and the Wilderness.

Macon - W.H.C. Price; till re-organized. D.H. Garrison; killed at Sharpsburg. Thomas Fitzgerald; killed at Chancellorsville. E.H. Rowell.

Thirteenth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

The Thirteenth was organized at Montgomery, July 19, 1861, and at once proceeeded to Virginia. Ordered to Yorktown, it was there brigaded under Gen. Rains. It lay at that place till the army fell back on Richmond the following spring. At Seven Pines the regiment was engaged warmly, and the casualties were 7 killed and 45 wounded. Held in reserve during the battles in front of Richmond, it was nevertheless subjected there to a destructive fire, from which it suffered severely. As part of Archer's brigade, under Colquitt of Georgia, the regiment took part in the first Maryland campaign, losing lightly at Boonsboro, but heavily at Sharpsburg. The winter was passed on the Rappahannock, and its monotony was relieved by the frightful repulse of Burnside at Fredericksburg, of which the Thirteenth was a witness; and where it suffered lightly. Col. Fry led the brigade in the assault on Hooker at Chancellorsville, and there the Thirteenth lost half of the 460 men with which it went into the battle. It was in the Pennsylvania campaign, and at Gettysburg its colors were planted on the crest of the ridge, where they were torn to shreds, and the regiment was again terribly mutilated. Retiring to Virginia, the Thirteenth passed the winter of 1863-4 mostly in camp. At the Wilderness the regiment actively participated, and the loss was comparatively heavy. It took part in the subsequent operations around Petersburg, being now in the brigade of Gen. Sanders of Greene. - the Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, and Fourteenth Alabama regiments - subsequently commanded by Gen. W.H. Forney of Calhoun. Under Col. Aiken the remnant of about 100 men surrendered at Appomattox. Of the 1245 men on its rolls, about 150 were killed in battle, or died of wounds, 275 died of disease, 64 were transferred, and 202 were discharged.

Field and Staff

Colonels - B.D. Frey of Tallapoosa; wounded at Seven Pines and Sharpsburg, and wounded and captured at Gettysburg; promoted. James Aiken of Randolph.

Lieutenant Colonels - Julius C.B. Mitchell of Montgomery; resigned. Reginald H. Dawson of Wilcox; resigned. Wm. H. Betts of Macon; resigned. James Aiken; wounded at Chancellorsville and Bristow Station; promoted.

Majors - Samuel B. Marks of Montgomery; resigned. Wm H. Betts; promoted. James Aiken; promoted. John T. Smith of Randolph; killed at Chancellorsville; retired. L.P. Broughton of Butler; killed at Wilderness.

Captains, and Counties from Which Companies Cames

Wilcox - R.H. Dawson; elected lieutenant colonel. Jas. D. Clark; killed at Mechanicsville. Samuel Sellers.

Macon - Wm. H. Bettes; promoted. E.C. Chambers; wounded and captured at Gettysburg.

Coosa - Osceola Kyle; resigned. N.J. Taylor; died in the service. B.A. Bowen.

Randolph - James Aiken; promoted. A.S. Reeves; wounded at Sharpsburg.

Randolph - M.D. Robinson; wounded; retired. John D.H. Robinson; wounded and captured at Gettysburg.

Tallapoosa - S.T. Strickland; resigned. J.V. Ashurst; wounded at Chancellorsville; retired. James M. Simpson; wounded at Gettysburg.

Butler - John Glasgow; resigned. R.N. Cook; killed at second Cold Harbor.

Coosa - Ellis Logan; resigned. J.A. Allison.

Randolph - John T. Smith; promoted. L.D. Ford.

Fourteenth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Auburn, August 1, 1861. It went first to Huntsville, thence to Virginia, where it arrived in November. Proceeding to Yorktown, it was brigaded under Gen. Pryor of Virginia, Longstreet's division. The command fell back with the army, and fought at Williamsburg with heavy loss to four of the companies. At Seven Pines it was again in action, with but few casualties. It participated at Mechanicsville, and was almost annihilated at Frazier's Farm and Malvern Hill, losing nearly all the officers, after charging the enemy's almost impregnable positions repeatedly. It moved towards the Potomac with the army, and was engaged with slight loss at the second battle of Manassas. Greatly reduced in strength, the Fourteenth fought at Sharpsburg, suffering severely in casualties. Placed in Wilcox's brigade, Anderson's division - with the Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, and Eleventh Alabama regiments - it was on the line of the Rappahannock during the winter of 1862 - 3 and was in line of battle on the highths when Burnside was repulsed at Fredericksburg. The regiment was hotly engaged, and with heavy loss, at Salem. It went on the Pennsylvania campaign, and the blood of its veterans was poured out freely at Gettysburg. The winter of 1863 - 4 was passed in camp near Orange C.H. and the Fourteenth was engaged with shocking results at both the Wilderness and Spottsylvania, emerging from those battles with much depleted ranks. Now in Sanders' brigade, Mahone's division, the Fourteenth participated in the numerous and bloody struggles around Petersbrug, during the last ten months of the war. Its colors were furled forever at Appomattox, where only 70 or 80, under Capt. Perry of Lowndes, were present. The names of 1317 men were on its rolls, over 250 of whom perished in battle, 350 died in the service, and 159 were discharged or transferred.

Field and Staff

Colonels - Thomas J. Judge of Montgomery; resigned. A.C. Wood of Randolph; wounded twice; resigned. Lucius Pinkard of Macon; wounded at Gettysburg; retired.

Lieutenant Colonels - David W. Baine of Lowndes; killed at Frazier's Farm. Lucius Pinkard; promoted. James A. Broome of Chambers; wounded at the Wilderness; retired.

Majors - Owen K. McLemore of Chambers; resigned. A.C. Wood; promoted. James A. Broome; promoted. R.A. McCord of Tallapoosa; killed at Chancellorsville. George W. Taylor of Randolph; wounded at Spottsylvania.

Adjutants - Lucius Pinkard of Macon; promoted. James S. Williamson, Jr. of Lowndes; wounded at Gettysburg.

Captains, and Counties from Which Companies Came.

Chambers - W.D. Harrington; resigned. J.F. Wallace; killed on picket on the Matapony. S. Hodge.

Lowndes - James S. Williamson; killed at Frazier's Farm. Simeon G. Perry.

Chambers - D.H. McCoy; resigned. M.L. Barber; wounded at Frazier's Farm; transferred to department duty. G.J. Bankston, wounded several times.

Chambers - James A. Broome; promoted. B.H. Pearson; captured on picket. Lieut. H.W. Burns commanded.

Chambers - W.C. Allen; died in the service. J.S.E. Davis; wounded several times.

Chambers - M.P. Ferrel; resigned. J.S. McLean; wounded several times.

Tallapoosa - W.H. Brooks; resigned. J.L. Craig; died in the service. R.. McCord; promoted. J.A. Terrel; promoted. Lieut. H.C. Veasy commanded for some time.

Tallapoosa - W.W. Selman; resigned. W.B. O'Brien; wounded twice; retired. C.H. Lambeth; killed at Wilderness. J.B. Winslett.

Talladega - J.T. Bell; killed at Mechanicsville. E. Folk; killed at Petersburg.

Randolph - A.C. Wood; promoted. George W. Taylor; promoted. G.F. Weaver; wounded; retired. B.I. Pate; wounded; resigned.

Fifteenth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment organized at Fort Mitchell in the summer of 1861, and moved at once into Virginia. Joining the main army near Manassas, it was brigaded with the 21st Georgia, 21st N. Carolina, and 16th Mississippi, under Gen. G.B. Crittenden of Kentucky; Gen I.R. Trimble succeeding Crittenden in December. When the army moved over to Yorktown, the Fifteenth remained on the Shenandoah, in Gen. T.J. Jackson's division. It was engaged with slight loss at Front Royal and Winchester, but lost 9 killed and 33 wounded, out of 425, at Cross Keys. Moving over to Richmond, in Jackson's flank movement on McClellan, it entered the first battle of Cold Harbor with 412 men, and lost 34 killed and 110 wounded. Five days after, it suffered lightly at Malvern Hill. On the march in Maryland, it was engaged at Hazel River and Manassas Junction with a loss of 6 killed and 22 wounded. A day or two later the Fifteenth participated in the second and greater battle of Manassas, losing 21 killed and 91 wounded out of 440 men engaged. At Chantilly the regiment lost 4 killed and 14 wounded, and took part in the investment of Harper's Ferry, with trivial loss. At Sharpsburg, of 300 engaged, 9 were killed and 75 wounded. Under fire at Fredericksburg, the casualties were one killed and 34 wounded. The Fifteenth was then placed in a brigade uner Gen. Law (with the Fourth, Forty-fourth, Forty-seventh, and Forty-eighth Alabama regiments), Longstreet's corps. At Suffolk it lost 4 killed and 18 wounded. It took part in the grand assault of Hood's division on Gettysburg, and within a few minutes lost 72 killed, 190 wounded, and 81 missing, out of 644 men engaged. The Fifteenth suffered lightly at Battle Mountain, and, transferred to the West, bore its colors proudly at Chicamauga, where it lost 19 killed and 123 wounded, out of 425 engaged. In the fierce fights at Brown's Ferry and Lookout Valley, the regiment lost 15 killed and 40 wounded. Six killed and 21 wounded at Knoxville, and light loss at Bean's Station, closed the operations of the regiment in Tennessee. It took 450 men in at the Wilderness and Spottsylvania, and lost 18 killed and 48 wounded. At Hanover Junction and the second Cold Harbor the loss was 6 killed and 16 wounded, and then the regiment took its place in the "last ditch" at Petersburg. At Deep Bottom a third of its 275 men present were killed or wounded, and at Fussell's Mill the loss was 13 killed and 90 wounded. The Fifteenth took part in the subsequent severe fighting, and surrendered at Appomattox 170 strong. Of 1633 on the rolls, over 260 fell in battle, 440 died in the service, and 231 were transferred or discharged.

Field and Staff

Colonels - James Cantey of Russell; promoted. John F. Treutlen of Barbour; resigned. William C. Oates of Henry; wounded at Brown's Ferry. A.A. Lowther of Russell; wounded at Fussell's Mill.

Lieutenant Colonels - J.F. Treutlen; promoted. Isaac B. Feagan of Barbour; wounded at Gettysburg; retired.

Majors - J.W.L. Daniel of Barbour; resigned. A.A. Lowther; wounded at Wilderness; promoted.

Adjutants - Locke Weems of Russell; transferred to line. DeB. Waddell; transferred to line.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Russell - A.A. Lowther; promoted. Locke Weems; mortally wounded at Gaines' Mill. F.K. Shaaf.

Barbour - Isaac B. Feagan; promoted. R.A. Wright; wounded at second Manassas; retired. Noah B. Feagan.

Macon - Peter V. Guerry; killed at first Cold Harbor. J. H. Ellison; killed at Gettysburg; .... Guerry.

Barbour - .... Worthington; died in the sevice. B.A. Hill; killed at Fussell's Mill.

Dale - E. Brooks; resigned. W.A. Edwards; resigned. G.A.C. Mathews; wounded near Richmond; retired. .... Glover; killed at Petersburg.

Pike - B.F. Lewis; resigned. Geo. Y. Malone; wounded at first Cold Harbor; retired. DeKalb Williams.

Henry - W.C. Oates; promoted. Henry C. Brainard; killed at Gettysburg. John A. Oates; died of wounds received at Gettysburg. DeB. Waddell.

Barbour and Dale - W.N. Richardson; captured in east Tennessee. Benjamin Gardner; resigned.

Pike - Frank Park; killed at Knoxville. W.H. Strickland; wounded at Fussell's Mill.

Barbour - Henry C. Hart; transferred to department duty. W.J. Bethune; wounded at Gettysburg.

Pike (March 1862) - .... Hill; killed at Cross Keys. Lee Bryan; wounded at first Cold Harbor; retired. Jas. Hatcher.

Sixteenth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

The Sixteenth was organized at Courtland, August 6, 1861. Ordered to Knoxville, it was there placed in Gen. Zollikoffer's brigade. Under that commander it fought at Fishing Creek, and lost 64 men there. Transferred to another field of operations, and placed in the brigade of Gen. Wood of Lauderdale - with the 33rd Alabama, 44th Tennessee, and 32nd and 33rd of Mississippi - it was very warmly engaged at Shiloh, where it lost 162 men. As part of Buckner's division, it moved into Kentucky, and was held in the reserve at Perryville, and not actively engaged. The Sixteenth participated in the affair at Triune with slight loss; and was in the thickest of the battle of Murfreesboro, where its loss was 168 killed and wounded. The regiment remained in the vicinity of Tullahoma till the army of Tennessee fell back to Chattanooga. At Chicamauga it was in Cleburne's division, and its colors floated "in the van of chivalric men" in that fierce grapple with a courageous foe, and its loss was 244 killed and wounded. From the disaster at Mission Ridge the Sixteenth retired with trivial loss, and wintered at Dalton. Gen. Mark Lowery of Mississippi was now in command of the brigade, to which the Forty-fifth Alabama and Gibson's Battalion were soon added. From Dalton to Atlanta the Sixteenth bore an honorable share in the wonderful retrograde movement of the Western Army, fighting by day and entrenching by night, and its casualties were 200 in number. On that field of blood, Jonesboro, the Sixteenth left about 150 of its men, and was an actor in the other scenes of the fearful drama around Atlanta. It moved with Hood into Tennessee, and in the fruitless and sanguinary struggles at Franklin and Nashville lost half its remaining force, and every commissioned officer. A remnant followed the march of the army into the Carolinas, and surrendered at Goldsboro, about 50 men being present. It had been consolidated with the 1st and 45th Alabama regiments.

Field and Staff

Colonels - Wm. B. Wood of Lauderdale; transferred. A.H. Helvenston of Marion; resigned. Frederick A. Ashford of Lawrence; killed at Nashville.

Lieutenant Colonels - John W. Harris of Franklin; resigned. A.H. Helvenston; wounded at Murfreesboro; promoted. Jas. McGaughey of Franklin; killed at Chicamauga.

Majors - A.H. Helvenston; wounded at Shiloh; promoted. James McGaughey; wounded at Murfreesboro; promoted. F.A. Ashford; promoted.

Adjutant - Brice Wilson of Franklin; killed at Franklin.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Lauderdale - Alexander D. Coffee; resigned. Oliver S. Kennedy; resigned. Calvin Carson.

Franklin - Jas. M'Gaughey; wounded at Shiloh; promoted. Barton Dickson; wounded at Chicamauga and at New Hope.

Franklin - James W.C. Smith; resigned. Johm Beene; wounded and captured at Franklin.

Franklin - W.W. Weatherford; resigned. John Beene; wounded and captured at Franklin.

Lawrence - Frederick A. Ashford; promoted. Frederick Sherrod; wounded at Murfreesboro.

Lawrence - William Hodges; wounded at Chicamauga.

Marion - John B. Powers; resigned. John H. Bankhead; wounded.

Lawrence - William S. Bankhead; resigned. Lafayette Swope; resigned. Robert McGregor; killed at Nashville.

Marion - George W. Archer; wounded at Atlanta.

Conecuh - J.J. May.

Seventeenth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Montgomery in August 1861. In November it moved to Pensacola, and was present at the bombardment in that month, and in January after. In March 1862 the regiment was sent to west Tennessee. Brigaded under J.K. Jackson of Georgia - with the Eighteenth, Twenty-first, and Twenty-fourth Alabama regiments - the regiment fought at Shiloh, and lost 125 killed and wounded. A month after, it was in the fight at Farmington with few casualties. In the autumn, when Gen. Bragg moved into Kentucky, the Seventeenth, much depleted by sickness, was left at Mobile. It was there drilled as heavy artillery, and had charge of eight batteries on the shore of the bay. It remained at that post till March 1864, when it was ordered to Rome, Ga. The brigade consisted of the Seventeenth and Twenty-ninth Alabama, and the First and Twenty-sixth Alabama, and Thirty-seventh Mississippi, were soon after added, the command devolving at different times on Gen. Cantey of Russell, Col. Murphey of Montgomery, Col. O'Neal of Lauderdale, and Gen. Shelley of Talladega. It was engaged at the Oostenaula bridge, and in the three days' battle of Resaca, with severe loss. The Seventeenth had its full share of the trials and hardships of the campaign from Dalton to Jonesboro, fighting almost daily, especially at Cassville, New Hope, Kennesa, Lost Mountain, and Atlanta. In the battle of Peach-tree Creek it lost 130 killed and wounded, and on the 28th of July 180 killed and wounded. The entire loss from the Resaca to Lovejoy's Station was 586, but few of whom were captured. The regiment moved into Tennessee with Gen. Hood, and lost at least two-thirds of its forces engaged at Franklin; and a number of the remainder were captured at Nashville. A remnant moved into North Carolina, and a part fought at Bentonville. It was then consolidated with the Twenty-ninth and Thirty-third Alabama regiments, with E.P. Holcombe of Lowndes as colonel, J.F. Tate of Russell lieutenant colonel, and Willis J. Milner of Butler major. The regiment surrendered at Greensboro, N.C. April 1865.

Field and Staff

Colonels - Thomas H. Watts of Montgomery; resigned. R.C. Fariss of Montgomery; resigned. Virgil S. Murphey of Montgomery; captured at Franklin.

Lieutenant Colonels - R.C. Fariss; promoted. Virgil S. Murphey; promoted. Edward P. Holcombe of Lowndes; wounded at Resaca.

Majors - Virgil S. Murphey; promoted. Thomas J. Burnett of Butler; wounded at Atlanta.

Adjutants - W.M. Moon of Lowndes; resigned. S.J. Cumming of Monroe.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Lowndes - E.P. Holcombe; promoted. C.E. Saddler; wounded at Shiloh.

Butler - J. Dean; resigned. James S. Moreland; captured at Resaca.

Butler - W.D. Perryman; resigned. John Bolling; captured at Nashville.

Coosa - Thomas C. Bragg; resigned. John A. Hester; captured near Atlanta.

Randolph - Wiley E. White; captured at Huntsville.

Montomery - Andrew L. O'Brien; wounded at Atlanta.

Russell - Thos. Ragland; killed at Atlanta. John F. Tate.

Monroe - W.W. McMillan; wounded and taken at Franklin.

Pike - A.M. Collins; resigned. J.L. Bones; wounded at Atlanta.

Butler - T.J. Burnett; promoted. T.A. McCane.

Eighteenth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Auburn, Sept. 4, 1861, and the field officers were appointed by President Davis. A few weeks later, it went to Mobile, by way of Huntsville, and was there brigaded under Gen. Gladden of Louisiana, with the Nineteenth, Twentieth, Twenty-second, and Twenty-fifth Alabama regiments, Withers' division. Ordered to Corinth in March 1862, the regiment was there brigaded under Gen. J.K. Jackson of Georgia, with the Seventeenth and Nineteenth Alabama regiments. The Eighteenth fought the first day at Shiloh, and lost 125 killed and wounded out of 420 men engaged. It was detailed to escort the brigade of Gen. Prentiss, which it had largely aided to capture, to the rear, and did not take part the second day. After the battle, the regiment being withouth field officers, was for a short time under officers detailed for the purpose. It was under fire at Blackland, and soon after was sent to Mobile. There the Eighteenth remained till April 1863, when it rejoined the army of Tennessee, in a brigade with the Thirty-sixth and Thirty-eight Alabama regiments, and the Ninth Alabama battalion (the latter being soon after raised to the Fifty-eighth regiment, and consolidated subsequently with the Thirty-second Alabama), commanded successively by Generals Cummings of Georgia, Clayton of Barbour, Holtzclaw of Montgomery, and Colonel Bush Jones of Perry. At Chicamauga the Eighteenth was terribly mutilated, losing 22 out of 36 officers, and 300 out of 500 men, killed and wounded. At Mission Ridge the Eighteenth was engaged, and lost about 90 men, principally captured. Having wintered at Dalton, it began the Dalton-Atlanta campaign with 500 effective men, and fought all the way down to Jonesboro, losing constantly in killed and wounded, but with no severe loss at any one place. It lost very nearly half its number during the campaign, and rendered effective service. The regiment went with Gen. Hood into Tennessee, and lost about 100 at Franklin, principally captured. When the army moved to the Carolinas in February 1865, the regiment was ordered to Mobile, and placed in the field works at Spanish Fort. It participated prominently in the siege of that place several weeks later, with some loss, and escaped when the defences were evacuated. It surrendered at Meridian, Miss., May 4, 1865, with the military department.

Field and Staff

Colonels - Edward C. Bullock of Barbour; died in service. Eli S. Shorter of Barbour; resigned. James T. Holtzclaw of Montgomery; wounded at Chicamauga; promoted. Peter F. Hunley of Shelby.

Lieutenant Colonels - Eli S. Shorter; promoted. J.T. Holtzclaw; wounded at Shiloh; promoted; Richard F. Inge of Greene; killed at Chicamauga. Peter F. Hunley; promoted. Shep. Ruffin of Pike; promoted.

Adjutants - B.W. Starke of Pike; wounded at Shiloh; resigned. John P.C. Whitehead of Georgia; transferred. R.P. Baker of Mobile.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Coffee - William M. Moxley; resigned. B.W. Starke; wounded at Shiloh; resigned. Joseph Justice; killed at Chicamauga. Noah Hutchinson.

Covington - James Brady; resigned. O.A. Stringer; killed at Chicamauga. Thomas Hardwick.

Jefferson - James Oliver; resigned. James McLaughlin.

Coosa - Guy Smith; resigned. Charles M. Cox; resigned. W.H. Hammond; killed at Chicamauga. George M. Williams; wounded at Chicamauga; captured at Franklin.

Tuskaloosa - Richard F. Inge; promoted. S.K. Wilkerson; captured at Mission Ridge.

Butler - H. Clay Armstrong; resigned. Aug. C. Greene; wounded at Jonesboro.

Jefferson - James Haughey; resigned. H.P. Walker.

Pike - Shep. Ruffin; promoted. S.K. Fielder; killed at Chicamauga. J.B. Darby; wounded at New Hope.

Shelby - Peter F. Hunley; wounded at Shiloh; promoted. J.M. Mickle; killed at Chicamauga. .... Martin.

Talladega - John Calhoun; resigned. H. Clay Stone; wounded at Chicamauga; detached. Thomas M. Riser.

Nineteenth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

The Nineteenth was organized at Huntsville, August 14, 1861, and at once ordered to Mobile. It remained there about three months, then was at Pensacola a fortnight. Ordered to Corinth, the regiment was brigaded under General Gladden of Louisiana, with the Twenty-second, Twenty-fifth, and Twenty-sixth Alabama regiments, to which the Thirty-ninth was added after the battle of Shiloh. In that battle the Nineteenth received its appalling baptism of blood, losing 110 killed and 240 wounded of the 650 that followed its colors into the action. Gen. Frank Gardner soon after succeeded to the command of the brigade, and led it into Kentucky, where it did not come in collision with the foe. It retired with the army, and fought at Murfreesboro with a loss of about one hundred killed and wounded, about one-fourth of its strength. Gen. Deas of Mobile succeeded to the command of the brigade, and led it at Chicamauga, where it again lost very heavily. The casualties were few at Mission Ridge, and the Nineteenth wintered at Dalton. In the almost cessant battle from that place to Atlanta, the regiment lost largely in casualties, particularly at New Hope and near Marietta. The brigade being under Gen. Johnston of Perry, the Nineteenth was badly cut up in the battles of July 22 and 28 at Atlanta. It suffered lightly at Jonesboro, but having followed Gen. Hood into Tennessee, the Nineteenth lost severely in prisoners at Franklin, with few casualties. It went to North Carolina, and was engaged at Kinston and Bentonville, losing largely in the latter battle. Consolidated with the Fortieth and the Forty-sixth Alabama regiments at Salisbury (with M.L. Woods of Montgomery as colonel, and Ezekiel Gully of Sumter as lieutenant colonel), the Nineteenth surrendered at that place, 76 strong.

Field and Staff

Colonels - Joseph Wheeler of Georgia; promoted. Samuel K. McSpadden of Cherokee; captured at Resaca.

Lieutenant Colonels - Edw. D. Tracy of Madison; promoted to brigadier general. Geo. R. Kimbrough of Pickens.

Majors - Samuel K. McSpadden; promoted. George R. Kimbrough; promoted. Solomon Palmer of Blount.

Adjutants - Clifton Walker of Madison; wounded at Shiloh; transferred to Gen. Tracy's staff. C.G. Hale; wounded at Murfreesboro.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Pickens - George R. Kimbrough; promoted. R.J. Healy; killed at Murfreesboro. Dyer C. Hodo; wounded at Atlanta.

Blount - Wm. D. McKenzie; killed at Corinth. H.L. Houston; killed at Atlanta.

Jefferson - Wm. F. Hamby; wounded at Shiloh. Lieut. Rouse commanded.

Cherokee - Wm. P. Hollingsworth; transferred to General Tracy's staff. Ed. Thornton; killed at Jonesboro.

Cherokee - Rufus B. Rhea; wounded at Chicamauga.

Cherokee - Wm. E. Kirkpatrick; resigned. Marvel Israel; wounded at Chicamauga; retired. Thomas B. Williamson; wounded at Atlanta.

Cherokee - Jackson Millsap; resigned. John N. Barry; retired. James H. Leath; wounded at Atlanta.

Cherokee - J.L. Cunningham; transferred to Gen. Tracy's staff. Samuel B. Echols.

Cherokee - James H. Savage.

Blunt - J.H. Skinner; resigned. Solomon Palmer; promoted. Nathan J. Venable; killed at Marietta. Jas. K. Duffie.

Twentieth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Montgomery, Sept. 16, 1861, and proceeded to Mobile in November. In February 1862 it went to Knoxville, and was placed under Gen. Leadbetter of Mobile. Transferred to Barton's brigade, the Twentieth operated for some time in east Tennessee, and advanced into Kentucky with Gen. Kirby Smith, being in Reynolds' brigade, Heth's division. It was in the pursuit of Gen. Sill on Salt river, and joined Gen. Bragg just after the battle of Perryville. The regiment was in Col. T.H. Taylor's brigade for a short time, but shortly after the return to Tennessee a brigade of Alabamians was organized - the Twentieth, Twenty-third, Thirtieth, Thirty-first, and Forty-sixth regiments - and placed under Gen. Tracy of Madison, and in Stevenson's division. A few days prior to the battle of Murfreesboro, the division was sent to Vicksburg, and the regiment fought at Port Gibson the following spring, losing heavily in casualties. At Baker's Creek it again suffered severely, and was then pent up in Vicksburg. During that dreary siege the ranks of the Twentieth were greatly thinned, and it surrendered with the fortress. After the fall of Gen. Tracy at Port Gibson, Gen. S.D. Lee of South Carolina commanded the brigade, till Gen. Pettus of Dallas was placed over it in the parol camp at Demopolis. Ordered to join Gen. Bragg, the Twentieth participated in the battle of Mission Ridge without loss. The winter was passed at Dalton, and the regiment was engaged in the constant fighting from Dalton to Atlanta, being conspicuous at Rocky-face, and losing heavily at Kennesa. Its colors were borne through the iron hail at Jonesboro, and the remnant suffered severely. It moved into Tennessee with Gen. Hood, and lost largely at Nashville. From that disastrous field the Twentieth passed into North Carolina, and fought at Kinston and Bentonville. It was surrendered at Salisbury - about 165 rank and file. Of the original 1100 men with which the Twentieth took the field, only 63 were present at Salisbury.

Field and Staff

Colonels - Robert T. Jones of Perry; transferred. Isham W. Garrot of Perry; promoted, but killed at Vicksburg in command of the regiment. Edmund W. Pettus of Dallas; promoted. Jas. M. Dedman of Dallas; wounded near Franklin.

Lieutenant Colonels - I.W. Garrot of Perry; promoted. E.W. Pettus; captured at Port Gibson, but escaped; promoted. James M. Dedman of Dallas; promoted. Mitchell T. Porter of Jefferson; resigned. John W. Davis of Shelby; wounded at Rocky- face, and Marietta.

Majors - E.W. Pettus; promoted. A.S. Pickering of Perry; killed at Port Gibson. James M. Dedman; promoted. M.T. Porter; promoted. John W. Davis; wounded at Marietta; promoted. John G. Harris of Greene.

Adjutants - John L. Smith of Dallas; promoted to the adjutancy of the brigade. Francis M. Vance of Dallas.

Captains, and Counties from Which Companies Came.

Perry - A.S. Pickering; promoted. Leroy E. Davis.

Dallas and Bibb - James M Dedman wounded at Vicksburg; promoted. Thomas K. Fergusson.

Jefferson - Mitchell T. Porter; promoted. Jack Ayres; killed at Jonesboro. Andrew J. Tarrant.

Bibb - R. Hobson Pratt;* captured at Port Gibson. Lieut. Wm. Lowery commanded.

Greene - .... Watkins; resigned. John McKee Gould; detailed on Gen. Pettus' staff. Lieut. J.S. Smith commanded.

Perry and Bibb - Lucius J. Lockett; resigned. W.H. Sheppard; resigned. Isaac W. Parrish.

Shelby, Bibb, and Jefferson - John W. Davis; promoted. R.M. Deshazo; resigned. Geo. S. Nave; wounded at Marietta.

Perry and Bibb - John P. Peterson; resigned. Samuel W. Davisdon.

Greene - John G. Harris; promoted. Albert Avery; resigned. Noah H. Gewin.

Tuskaloosa - Jos. C. Guild; resigned. Benj. Massingale.

*This officer remained in prison during the war, and was entitled to the lieutenant-colonelcy of the regiment over Col. Davis.

Twenty-First Alabama

Infantry Regiment

The Twenty-first was mustered into service Oct. 13, 1861, at Mobile, and remained at Hall's Mill and Fort Gaines till ordered to Fort Pillow in March 1862. It remained there a few days, then moved to Corinth, where it was brigaded under Gen. Gladden. The regiment took part in the battle of Shiloh, where it lost six color-bearers in succession, and 200 killed and wounded out of about 650 engaged and was complimented in general orders. On the return to Corinth, the regiment was reorganized, and extended their enlistment from one year to "for the war." The Twenty-first was at Farmington, but its casualties were few. In the summer the regiment was ordered to Mobile, and was on garrison duty at Fort Morgan, and at Oven and Chocta Bluffs.* It was at Pollard a short time under Gen. Cantey, but was then ordered to the defenses of Mobile. Two companies were stationed at Fort Powell, where, with a loss of one killed, they withstood a bombardment of a fortnight from five gun-boats and six mortar-boats which attempted to force an entrance through Grant's Pass. Six companies of the regiment were captured at Fort Gaines, and two at Fort Morgan; but the two at Fort Powell blew up and evacuated the post. The men captured at Fort Gaines were exchanged, the others were not. The remainder of the regiment were part of the garrison of Spanish Fort, where it lost about 10 killed and 25 wounded. The Twenty-first was surrendered at Cuba, in Sumter, May 6, 1865, about 250 strong. It is but just to say that the Twenty-first was composed largely of artisans from Mobile, many of whom were detached to assist in the various government works.

Field and Staff

Colonels - James Crawford of Mobile; resigned. Charles D. Anderson of Mobile; captured at Fort Gaines.

Lieutenant Colonels - A.J. Ingersoll of Mobile; resigned. Stewart W. Cayce of Mobile; resigned. Charles S. Stewart of Mobile; killed at Fort Morgan. J.M. Williams of Mobile.

Majors - Frederick Stewart of Mobile; till re-organized. Jas. M. Williams; promoted. Chas. B. Johnson of Mobile.

Adjutants - S.W. Cayce; promoted. James M. Williams; transferred to line. George Vidmer of Mobile; wounded at Spanish Fort.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Mobile - John F. Jewett; till re-organization. James M. Williams; promoted. Jno. F. Cothran; captured at Ft. Morgan.

Mobile - Charles B. Johnson; promoted. John O'Connor; captured at Fort Gaines.

Marengo - J.M. Rembert; wounded at Shiloh; died in the service. F. Smith; captured at Fort Gaines.

Mobile - Cary W. Butt; wounded at Shiloh; resigned. Melville C. Butt.

Marengo - John C. Chamberlain; resigned. Henry Sosaman; captured at Fort Gaines.

Mobile and Baldwin - F.J. McCoy; till re-organized. B. F. Dade; captured at Fort Gaines.

Mobile - S.S. Taylor; died in the service. Murdock McInnis; captured at Fort Gaines.

Mobile - Charles Devaux. Angelo Festorazzi. (Companies transferred to the First Louisiana.)

Mobile - Charles S. Stewart; promoted. A.P. Doran; captured at Fort Morgan; resigned. C. LeBaron Collins; captured at Fort Morgan.

(Conscripts) 1862 - A.S. Carrington; captured at Ft. Gaines.

(Conscripts) 1862 - Edw. Spalding; captured at Ft. Gaines.

*It was while the regiment lay at Mobile that a sub-marine boat was constructed to operate against the blockading squadron. After ten or fifteen men had been lost by the sudden sinking of the vessel, Lieut. George E. Dixon, of Capt. Cothran's company, with several of his men, volunteered to man it. But the current at the entrance of the bay was too strong, and Dixon and his men accompanied it to Charleston. There it went to sea one night, and blew up the Housatonic, of the federal blockading squadron, causing her to sink, with all her crew. The fate of Dixon and his men was not known till after the peace, when his boat was found by the side of the Housatonic, and in its air-tight walls were encoffined the skeletons of the brave crew. Dixon was a Kentuckian by birth and an engineer by profession.

Twenty-Second Alabama

Infantry Regiment

The Twenty-second was organized at Montgomery in November 1861, and was encamped at Mobile during the winter. Ordered to west Tennessee, and brigaded under Gen. Gladden of Louisiana, the regiment was engaged at Shiloh with very heavy loss. After that battle, Gen. Frank Gardner was placed over the brigade - Nineteenth, Twent-second, Twenty-fifth, Twenty-sixth-Fiftieth, and Thirty-ninth Alabama regiments - and led it into Kentucky. It was present at Mumfordsville, and skirmished at Perryville. It came back with the army, and fought at Murfreesboro with severe loss. Gen. Deas then assumed command of the brigade. The regiment was in the splendid line of battle which moved to the assault of Rosecrans' army at Chicamauga, and lost five color-bearers, and 175 killed and wounded out of about 400 men. The Twenty-second suffered lightly at Mission Ridge, and wintered at Dalton. It participated in the campaign from Dalton to Atlanta, losing gradually by the constant fighting, the brigade being under Gen. Johnston of Perry a short time. At Atlanta, July 22nd and 28th the loss of the regiment was quite severe, and large at Jonesboro. It moved into Tennessee with Gen. Hood, and suffered severely at Franklin, and lightly at Nashville. Transferred beyond the Edisto, the Twenty-second moved into North Carolina, skirmishing with the advance of Thomas' army. The loss at Kinston and Bentonville was light, Colonel Toulmin leading the brigade. Consolidated with the Twenty-fifth, Thirty-ninth, and Twenty-sixth-Fiftieth, at Smithville, with H.T. Toulmin as colonel, N.B. Rouse of Butler as lieutenant colonel, and Robert Donald of Limestone as major, the regiment laid down its arms at Greenesboro, N.C., April 1865.

Field and Staff

Colonels - Zach C. Deas of Mobile; wounded at Shiloh; promoted. John C. Marrast of Mobile; died in the service. Benjamin R. Hart of Montgomery; killed near Atlanta. Harry T. Toulmin of Mobile.

Lieutenant Colonels - John C. Marrast; promoted. John Weedon of Mobile; killed at Chicamauga. Benj. R. Hart; promoted. Harry T. Toulmin; promoted. E. Herbert Armstead of Mobile; killed at Franklin.

Majors - Robert Beverly Armstead of Mobile; killed at Shiloh. John Weedon; promoted. B.R. Hart; wounded at Chicamauga; promoted. H.T. Toulmin; promoted. E. H. Armstead; promoted. Thomas McC. Prince, Jr. of Chocta; wounded at Franklin.

Adjutants - Elias F. Travis of Mobile; wounded at Shiloh; transferred. Wm. G. Smith of Mobile; resigned. J.L. Lockwood of Montgomery; wounded at Jonesboro.

Field and Staff

Walker - John Weedon; promoted. J.M. Whitney.

Chocta - Abner C. Gaines; killed at Shiloh. Thos. McC. Prince, Jr.; wounded at Chicamauga; promoted.

Clarke - James Deas Nott; killed at Chicamauga. Joseph R. Cowan; wounded near Marietta.

Cherokee - Stephen R. Hood; resigned. E.H. Armstead; promoted. Thomas M. Brindley; killed near Atlanta. Lieut. King commanded.

Calhoun - J.R. Northcutt; resigned. Jacob G. Mordecai.

Randolph - A.B. Shepher; wounded at Shiloh; resigned. James B. Martin.

Mobile - Harry T. Toulmin; wounded at Shiloh; promoted. S. Franklin Preston.

Pike - A.P. Love; wounded at Shiloh; retired. Willis C. Wood; wounded at Murfreesboro; resigned. W.H. Henderson; wounded at Kinston.

Montgomery and Pike - B.R. Hart; promoted. Hugh W. Henry.

Twenty-Third Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment organized at Montgomery, Nov. 19, 1861. Ordered shortly after, to Mobile, it was attached to General Gladden's brigade, and remained there till the following February. During a stay there of two months the regiment lost 82 men by disease. It then moved into east Tennessee, and was first brigaded under Gen. Leadbetter of Mobile, afterwards under Gen. Barton of Tennesee, and in June 1862 under Col. Taylor of Kentucky. The Twenty-third performed much arduous duty in east Tennessee, and formed part of Stephenson's division, Kirby Smith's corps, in the Kentucky campaign. When the army returned to Tennessee, a brigade was formed of the Twentieth, Twenty-third, Thirtieth, Thirth-first, and Forty-sixth Alabama regiments, and placed under Gen. Tracy of Madison. In December 1862, with Stephenson's division, the Twenty-third was moved to Vicksburg, and a few days later was present at the fight at Chicasa Bayou. It was hotly engaged at Port Gibson, where the brigade commander fell, and lost heavily there in killed and wounded, and captured. Gen. S.D. Lee then took command of the brigade. At Baker's Creek the Twenty-third was engaged, and lost a number captured. The next day it was in the fight at Big Black bridge, and when the army fell back, the regiment was left, by oversight, and for twelve hours resisted the whole federal army, without severe loss. Retiring into Vicksburg, the regiment shared in that siege, fighting day and night, but without many casualties. Paroled immediately, the regiment was soon exchanged, and joined the Army of Tennessee just after the battle of Chicamauga, Gen. Pettus of Dallas commanding the brigade. The Twenty-third took part at Mission Ridge with light loss, and wintered at Dalton. At the beginning of the campaign, it suffered heavy loss at Resaca, but was constantly in front of Sherman all the way down the bloody path to Atlanta and Jonesboro, suffering very severely in the latter battle. The regiment marched with Gen. Hood into Tennessee, was engaged at Columbia with considerable loss, and at Nashville, where many of the men were captured. It guarded the rear of the retreating army, and moved into the Carolinas. From Branchville to Bentonville it fought Sherman, and was consolidated with the Forty-sixth Alabama, with J.B. Bibb as colonel, Osceola Kyle of Coosa as lieutenant colonel, and J.T. Hester as major, and surrendered at Salisbury, North Carolina. Nearly 1200 names were on the rolls of the Twenty-third; it had 436 muskets at Rocky-face, and 76 surrendered at Salisbury, under Col. Bibb.

Field and Staff

Colonels - Franklin K. Beck of Wilcox; captured at Vicksburg; killed at Resaca. Joseph B. Bibb of Montgomery; wounded at Nashville.

Lieut. Colonels - Jos. B. Bibb of Montgomery; promoted.

Majors - Felix Tait of Wilcox; resigned. John J. Longmire of Monroe; resigned. F. McMurray of Macon; wounded at Mission Ridge; retired. A.C. Roberts of Marengo; killed at New Hope. J.T. Hester of Montgomery.

Adjutants - Henry Goldthwaite of Mobile; resigned. J. T. Norman of Macon; captured at Port Gibson. William Beard of Conecuh.

Captains, and counties from Which the Companies Came.

Wilcox - J.J. Longmire; promoted. G.H. Moye; resigned. W.P. Steen; captured at Vicksburg; wounded at Atlanta.

Macon - F. McMurray; wounded and captured at Port Gibson; promoted. F. Rutherford; killed at Jonesboro. Lieut. Carnie Leslie commanded.

Marengo - A.L. Norwood; resigned. A.C. Roberts; promoted. Robert Chapman.

Conecuh - D.K. Smith; resigned. J.T. Hester; promoted. James M. Anderson.

Monroe - G.G. Mathews; resigned. H.M. Graham; captured at Vicksburg.

Lowndes - Henry P. Reid; resigned. S. Oliver Merriwether; captured at Port Gibson.

Chocta - J.G. Yates; resigned. John Stevens; killed at Port Gibson. F. Butterfield; killed at Atlanta.

Conecuh - T.B. McCall; resigned. B.L. Selman; captured at Vicksburg; wounded at Resaca; Lieut. McDonald commanded.

Baldwin - R.Y. Rew; resigned. W.H. Miles; captured at Vicksburg.

Wilcox and Clarke - Wm. E. Powe; resigned. Greene D. McConnell; captured at Vicksburg.

Twenty-Fourth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Mobile in August 1861, and remained at Fort Morgan till April 1862. It then moved to Corinth, and was brigaded under Gen. J.K. Jackson of Georgia. The regiment was first under fire at Blackland and Farmington, with trifling loss. It shared the privations of the Kentucky campaign, but was not engaged. Placed in the brigade of Gen. Manigault of South Carolina, with the Twenty-eighth and Thirty-fourth Alabama, and two South Carolina regiments, the Twenty-fourth took part at Murfreesboro, where it lost about 100 killed and wounded. It moved back with the army to the line of the Chattanooga. In the grand forward movement at Chicamauga, the regiment bore its flag "high and haughtily in the face of Death," and lost 200 killed and wounded. It was engaged at Mission Ridge, with about 25 casualties. Having wintered at Dalton, the regiment fought all the way down from Crow Valley to Jonesboro, losing about 300 men, principally in the casualties of battle. With the army, the Twenty-fourth moved into Tennessee, and was engaged at Columbia, Franklin, and Nashville, but without severe loss in either. The regiment was part of the army that proceeded to the Carolinas, and was in the fight at Salisbury. Just before the surrender, it was consolidated with the Twenty-eight and Thirty-fourth Alabama regiments, with J.C. Carter of Montgomery as colonel, Starke H. Oliver of Mobile as lieutenant colonel, and P.G. Wood of Dallas as major. At the time of the surrender, near High Point, N.C., it was in Sharp's brigade, of D.H. Hill's division, S.D. Lee's corps, and numbered about 150 men.

Field and Staff

Colonels - Wm. A. Buck of Mobile; wounded at Murfreesboro; resigned. Newton N. Davis of Pickens; wounded and captured at Franklin.

Lieutenant Colonels - Wm. M. LeBaron of Mobile; resigned. Wm. B. Dennet of Mobile; resigned. N.N. Davis; promoted. B.F. Sawyer of Talladega; retired. George A. Jennison of Mobile.

Majors - Wm. B. Dennet; promoted. Newton N. Davis; promoted. Junius J. Pierce of Shelby.

Adjutants - George A. Jennison; promoted. George B. Enholm of Mobile.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Mobile - W.B. Smith; killed at Murfreesboro. Bart. S. Chamberlain; wounded at Chicamauga. D.P. Berry.

Mobile - Bernard O'Connel; resigned. Wm. J. O'Brien; killed at Chicamauga; R.T.B. Parham; detached.

Shelby - Junius J. Pierce; promoted. Hubbel Pierce; wounded at Atlanta.

Mobile - George M. Bonner; till re-organized. Starke H. Oliver; wounded at Atlanta.

Clarke - Dan'l McLeod; till reorganized. Thos. I. Kimball.

Mobile - John D. Fowler; resigned. W.P. Fowler; wounded at Atlanta.

Mobile - Alphonse Hurtel; detached. Lieut. Wm. H. Higley commanded.

Pickens - N.N. Davis; promoted. W.J. McCracken; wounded at Atlanta. Lieut. W.B. Dunlap commanded.

Mobile - James Hooper; till re-organized. John B. Hazard; wounded and captured at Mission Ridge; died at Johnson's Island. Lieut. John M. Nettles commanded.

Talladega and Shelby - Benjamin F. Sawyer; promoted. James Hall; wounded at Bentonville.

Twenty-Fifth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Mobile in December 1861 by the consolidation of two battalions. It remained in that vicinity under Gen. Gladden, the regiment fought at Shiloh, where its casualties were 15 killed and 75 wounded. Placed under Gen. Gardner, with the Nineteenth, Twenty-second, Thirty-ninth, and Twenty-sixth-Fiftieth, the Twenty-fifth met with trifling loss at Farmington. It moved into Kentucky with Gen. Bragg from the Chattanooga base, but was not engaged in any action. It came back, and participated at Murfreesboro - Col. Loomis commanding the brigade - with a loss of 13 killed, 88 wounded, and 16 missing, out of about 250 present for duty. The regiment - Gen. Deas in command of the brigade - fell back with the army, and was fearfully mutilated. It again suffered severely at Missionary Ridge, but wintered and recruited at Dalton. All along the bloody track of the hostile armies through north Georgia, the Twenty-fifth left a record, especially at New Hope. At Atlanta, July 22, the regiment lost 49 per cent of its force, but captured two stands of colors, and more prisoners than it numbered. Six days later, near the same spot, the Twenty-fifth again lost very heavily. It was engaged at Jonesboro without severe loss, but suffered considerably at Columbia, on Hood's arrival in middle Tennessee. At Franklin the regiment again lost largely, and at Nashville its loss was not light, but it preserved its organization on the retreat. Proceeding to the Carolinas, the Twenty-fifth was in Sherman's front, with some casualties at Columbia and Kinston, and with large loss at Bentonville. Consolidated with the Nineteenth, Twenty-second, Thirty-ninth, and Twenty-sixth-Fiftieth, the regiment was shortly after surrendered at Goldsboro, having about 75 men of the old Twenty-fifth present for duty.

Field and Staff

Colonels - John Q. Loomis of Coosa; wounded at Shiloh and Murfreesboro; resigned. Geo. D. Johnston; promoted.

Lieutenant Colonels - Wm. B. McClellan of Talladega; resigned; George D. Johnston; promoted.

Major - George D. Johnston of Perry; promoted.

Adjutant - John Stout of Coosa; wounded at Murfreesboro, Atlanta and Franklin.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Covington - M. Harper; killed at Shiloh. Charles Corege; resigned. Bushrod W. Bell.

Pike - John B. Curtis; resigned. N.B. Rouse.

Shelby - WileyPope; resigned. Lieut. Pledger commanded.

St. Clair - A.W. Nixon; resigned. H. Lewis Morris; wounded and captured at Murfreesboro; wounded at New Hope and Franklin.

Pickens - D.M. Richards; wounded and captured at Mission Ridge.

Randolph - Wm. A. Handley; wounded at Murfreesboro; resigned. F.M. Handley; wounded at Franklin.

Talladega - Joseph D. McCann; resigned. Archibald A. Patterson; killed at Murfreesboro. Silas P. Bradford.

Talladega and St. Clair - Edmund Turner; resigned. William Spruce; wounded at Chicamauga.

Coffee and Pike - D.P. Costello; wounded at Shiloh; killed at Murfreesboro. Dan'l C. Monroe; wounded at Chicamauga.

Calhoun - Mathew Alexander; resigned. W.B. Howell; wounded at Atlanta and Bentonville.

Twenty-Sixth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Tuscumbia in the summer of 1861, and soon after went to Virginia. It was in camp of instruction at Richmond during the fall and winter, and in March 1862 was moved to Yorktown, and placed in the brigade of Gen. Rains of Tennessee. It was under fire there for six weeks, with few casualties. Gen. Jos. E. Johnston led the regiment into position at Williamsburg, where its loss was inconsiderable. At Richmond it was placed in the brigade of Gen. Rodes of Tuskaloosa - shortly after re-organized so as to embrace the Third, Fifth, Sixth, Twelfth, and Twenty-sixth Alabama regiments - and lost 22 per cent of its numbers in casualties at Seven Pines. The Twenty-sixth was also hotly engaged at Gaines' Mill, Frazier's Farm, and Malvern Hill, emerging from the effects of those terrible struggles with only 300 of the 600 with which it entered, the others having gone down in the carnage of battle. The regiment was in the van of the army as it moved over the Potomac and fought at Boonsboro and Sharpsburg, losing in those two battles 10 killed and 45 wounded. Having wintered on the Rappahannock, the Twenty-sixth was present at Fredericksburg. In the grand advance of Jackson's corps at Chancellorsville - Col. O'Neal leading the brigade - the regiment lost very heavily, but its colors floated at the front. It then moved into Pennsylvania, and took part in the battle of Gettysburg, with a loss of 7 killed, 58 wounded, and 65 missing. Retiring with the army into Virginia, the Twenty-sixth skirmished at Kelly's Ford and Mine Run. During the winter, the Alabama legislature petitioned to have the regiment sent home to recruit its thinned ranks, and it remained a short time at Pollard. Ordered to Dalton in the spring of 1864, it was placed in Cantey's brigade, and lost gradually but largely in the almost incessant battle from Dalton to Atlanta. Having marched with Gen. Hood into Tennessee, the regiment was badly cut up at Nashville, and only a remnant surrendered at Greensboro, North Carolina, to which place it had been transferred with the forces.

Field and Staff

Colonels - Wm. R. Smith of Tuskaloosa; resigned. E.A. O'Neal; wounded at Seven Pines, Boonsboro, Chancellorsville.

Lieutenant Colonel - John S. Garvin of Tuskaloosa; wounded at Chancellorsville and Franklin.

Majors - R.D. Reddin of Fayette; resigned. D.F. Bryan of Fayette.

Adjutant - S.B. Moore of Madison.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Fayette - .... Moore; resigned. E.M. Vandiver; wounded at Chancellorsville.

Fayette - .... Newton; resigned. J.M. Harton.

Fayette - D.M. Gideon.

Fayette - H.H. Reid; resigned. Sidney B. Smith.

Marion - D.F. Bryan; promoted. E.M. Turner.

Marion - .... Lefoy.

Marion - J.S. White; resigned. J.W. White.

Fayette - W.H. Lindsey.

Fayette - Elbert Leach.

F.M. Smith, captain of sharpshooters.

Twenty-Sixth-Fiftieth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Corinth, in March 1862, by the consolidation of two battalions then recently recruited. Placed in the brigade of Gen. Gladden, it fought at Shiloh with a loss of 12 killed and 111 wounded out of about 700 engaged. Gen. Gardner having taken command of the brigade -- the Nineteenth, Twenty-second, Twenty-fifth, Twenty-sixth-Fiftieth and Thirty-ninth Alabama regiments -- the Twenty-sixth Fiftieth moved into Kentucky, and lost about 20 men in combat with Gen. Sill's division. It participated in the battle of Murfreesboro, with a loss of about 200 men in casualties of 600 engaged. The regiment wintered at Tullahoma, and was with the army when it fell back. Now under Gen. Deas as brigadier, the regiment moved to the assault at Chicamauga about 500 strong, of which about one-fifth were killed or wounded. It was in the line at Mission Ridge, and lost about 45 men, mostly captured. On the retreat from Dalton, where it had wintered, the regiment performed arduous and active service, fighting nearly every day. In the bloody battles around Atlanta the regiment lost very heavily, but at Jonesboro the list of casualties was small. It then moved into Tennessee with Gen. Hood, and was badly mutilated at Franklin. The regiment subsequently proceeded to the Carolinas, and it was at Kinston that a line of skirmishers, 40 strong, principally from it, under Captain E.B. Vaughan, captured a stand of colors and 300 men of the 15th Connecticut. The Twenty-sixth-Fiftieth laid down its arms at Greenesboro, N.C., with Gen. Johnston's forces.

Field and Staff

Colonel -- John G. Coltart of Madison; wounded at Shiloh and Atlanta.

Lieutenant Colonels -- Wm. D. Chaddick of Madison; resigned. Newton Nash Clements of Tuskaloosa.

Majors -- .... Gwin of Tennessee; wounded at Shiloh; resigned. N.N. Clements; promoted. Thomas H. Gilbert of Limestone; resigned. John C. Hutto of Walker.

Adjutant -- John C. Bruckner of Madison; killed at Atlanta.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Calhoun -- .... Sappington; resigned. T.T. Lankford; retired. Martin Walker.

Limestone -- T.H. Gilbert; promoted. J. Archie Ray.

Jackson -- Lemuel G. Meade; resigned. James E. Daniel.

Blount -- George Arnold; killed at Atlanta. John Elrod.

Limestone -- James H. Malone; resigned. John B. McClellan; transferred. William Richardson.

Tuskaloosa -- N.N. Clements; promoted. John D. Burgin.

Walker and Fayette -- John C. Clemons; resigned. E. B. Vaughan.

Walker -- John C. Hutto; promoted.

Lauderdale -- John C. Haynie; resigned. Robert Donald.

Walker and Fayette -- ...... Wooten; resigned. John B. McClellan.

Twenty-Seventh Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized at St. Heinian, Tennessee, a number of companies having flocked to that point, in the winter of 1861. Ordered to Fort Henry, the regiment shared in the defence of that place, but retired before its surrender, and formed part of the garrison of Fort Donelson. It took part in that memorable conflict, and was there surrendered. A number of the command were in hospitals, &c, and these were not captured, but organized into two companies, joined the Thirty-third Mississippi, and lost 8 killed and 25 wounded at the battle of Perryville. The main body of the regiment was exchanged in September 1862, and was ordered to Port Hudson, where it was joined by the other two companies. It remained in that quarter during the winter, and was brigaded under Gen. Buford of Kentucky, Loring's division. It was then in the trenches at Jackson for ten days, and retreated with the army across the Pearl. The regiment passed the winter at Canton, and in the spring of 1864 was sent to the vicinity of Tuscumbia to recruit, being greatly reduced in numbers. A detachment of the regiment crossed the Tennessee, and captured about 100 of the enemy in April 1864. It was soon after ordered to Dalton, and placed in Scott's brigade with the Twelfth Louisiana, and Thirty-fifth, Forty-ninth, Fifty-fifth, and Fifty-seventh Alabama regiments - Loring's division, Stewart's corps. The Twenty-seventh was from that time forward a sharer in the vicisitudes of the Army of Tennessee, fighting with much loss throughout the Atlanta-Dalton campaign, and forming part of the last confederate wave of battle as it swept beyond the bloody abatis at Franklin, and beat vainly against the gates of Nashville. A mere skeleton of the regiment proceeded to the Carolinas, where it was consolidated with the Thirty-fifth, Forty-ninth, and Fifty-seventh Alabama regiments, and was surrendered at Greensboro, N.C. April 1865.

Field and Staff

Colonels - A.A. Hughes of Franklin; captured at Fort Donelson; died in the service. James Jackson of Lauderdale; wounded at Kennesa.

Lieutenant Colonels - James Jackson; captured at Fort Donelson; promoted. Edward McAlexander of Lauderdale.

Majors - Edward McAlexander; captured at Fort Donelson; promoted. R.G. Wright of Franklin.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.*

Franklin - J.B. Moore; till re-organized. Robert Watson; superceded. H. Rodgers; wounded at Kinston.

Franklin - R.G. Wright; captured at Fort Donelson; promoted. F. LeB. Goodwin.

Lauderdale - Empson B. Dudley; captured at Fort Donelson; wounded in Georgia.

Lawrence - H.B. Irwin of Lawrence; captured at Fort Donelson; wounded at Kinston.

Lauderdale - T.A. Jones; till re-organized. Rob't Andrews.

Madison - .... Roberts; till re-organized. John Corn.

Franklin - Tho's B. M'Cullough; transferred. W.A. Isbell; killed at Baker's Creek. S.S. Anderson; wounded at Franklin.

Morgan - ..... Humphrey; till re-organized. John B. Stewart.

Lawrence - Henry A. McGhee; resigned. Tho's McGhee.

Lauderdale - Hugh L. Ray; captured at Fort Donelson.

*Capt. Wm. Word, commanding one of the companies in this regiment attached to the Thirty-third Mississippi, was killed at Perryville.

Twenty-Eight Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Shelby Springs, March 29, 1862, about 1100 strong, to serve "for three years or the war." Shortly after the battle of Shiloh, the regiment reached Corinth, where many of the men died of disease. Brigaded under Gen. T. Rapier (shortly after succeeded by Gen. Duncan and Col. Manigault), with the Tenth and Nineteenth South Carolina, and Thirty-fourth Alabama - to which the Twenty-fourth Alabama was soon after added - the Twenty-eighth was first under fire in a skirmish at Corinth, where it lost two men. From Tupelo to Chattanooga, thence into Kentucky with Gen. Bragg, and the regiment fell back to middle Tennessee with the army. It fought at Murfreesboro with many casualties, but captured a battery. The winter and spring were passed near Tullahoma, and the regiment was hotly engaged at Chicamauga, losing largely in killed and wounded. At Lookout Mountain the regiment was nearly surrounded by the enemy, and fought desperately, losing 172 killed, wounded, and captured. It was also engaged two days later at Mission Ridge with some loss. During the winter, at Dalton, the Twenty-eighth re-enlisted "for the war." It participated in the severe campaign from Dalton to Atlanta, taking part in all the fighting, and losing largely in proportion to the men it had present for duty. The regiment followed Gen. Hood into Tennessee, and took part in the desperate and fruitless struggles at Franklin and Nashville, with severe loss. From that tragic theatre it went to North Carolina, where it was consolidated with the Twenty-fourth and Thirty-fourth Alabama, with J.C. Carter of Montgomery as colonel, Starke H. Oliver of Mobile as lieutenant colonel, and P.G. Wood of Dallas as major. The regiment surrendered at Greenesboro, N.C. in Sharpe's brigade, Hill's division, S.D. Lee's corps.

Field and Staff

Colonel - J.W. Frazer* of Tennessee; resigned. J.C. Reid.

Lieutenant Colonels - John C. Reid of Perry; promoted. W. Lavelle Butler; wounded and captured at Nashville.

Majors - T.W.W. Davies of Coosa; transferred to the navy. W.L. Butler; promoted.

Adjutants - Sumter Lee of Perry; resigned. Charles R. Harris of Perry; wounded and captured at Nashville.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Perry - W. Lavelle Butler; promoted. James H. Graham; wounded at Chicamauga; resigned. John F. Wilson; wounded at Franklin.

Blount and Marshall - John H. Turpin; wounded and captured at Murfreesboro. E.R. Kiker; captured at Mission Ridge.

Blount - .... Tidmore; resigned. John Couch.

Jefferson - Wm. M. Nabors.

Walker - H.A.M. Henderson; resigned. H.G. Loller; killed at Resaca. Lieut. Robert S. Cox commanded.

Walker - F.A. Gamble; resigned. L.E. Gilbert.

Jefferson - .... Miller; resigned. John C. Morrow; resigned. G.W. Hewitt; wounded at Murfreesboro and Chicamauga.

Jefferson - J.F. Tarrant; resigned. W.M. Hawkins; killed at Murfreesboro. Wm. R. McAdory; killed at Mission Ridge. Wm. A. McLeod; killed at Atlanta.

Dallas - F.M. Hopkins; captured at Mission Ridge. Lieutenant P.G. Wood commanded.

Perry - Charles R. Harris; resigned. Homer M. Ford.

Walker - F.A. Musgrove; wounded at Murfreesboro.

Twenty-Ninth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Pensacola in February, 1862, by the addition of two companies to the Fourth Alabama battalion - a body of eight companies, which had been organized the autumn before at Montgomery. The regiment remained at Pensacola till it was evacuated, suffering much from diseases that usually afflict raw troops. It then lay between Pollard and Pensacola for over a year, when it was ordered to Mobile, and there remained from July 1863 to April 1864, save a short time that it was at Pollard. The regiment then joined the Army of Tennessee at Resaca, in time to initiate the Atlanta-Dalton campaign, and was brigaded with the First, Seventeenth, and Twenty-sixth of Alabama, and Thirty-seventh of Mississippi regiments, commanded at different intervals by Col. Murphey of Montgomery, Gen. O'Neal of Lauderdale, and Gen. Shelley of Talladega. The Twenty-ninth was engaged at the battle of Resaca with a loss of about 100 killed and wounded, out of 1100 men engaged. At New Hope the loss was very heavy, and at Peach-tree Creek the regiment was cut to pieces. Again, July 28, near Atlanta, half of the regiment was killed and wounded in the fierce and protracted assault on the enemy's line. The Twenty-ninth then moved into Tennessee with Gen. Hood, and lost very heavily in casualties at Franklin, and largely in casualties and prisoners at Nashville. A remnant of it moved into the Carolinas, and was engaged at Kinston and Bentonville with considerable loss. About 90 men surrendered at Greensboro, N.C.

Field and Staff

Colonels - J.R.F Tatnall of Georgia; transferred to the navy. John F. Conoley of Dallas.

Lieutenant Colonels - J.F. Conoley; promoted. Benjamin Morris of Barbour.

Majors - Benj. Morris; promoted. Henry B. Turner of Talladega; wounded at Atlanta.

Adjutants - Lemuel D. Hatch of Greene; transferred. Benj. H. Screws of Barbour; transferred to line. James Stephenson of Virginia.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Talladega - Henry B. Turner; promoted. E. Orear; wounded at Resaca; killed at Franklin.

Blount - Duncan Dew; wounded at Atlanta.

Blount - Wm. H. Musgrove; died in the service. John M. Hanna; killed at Atlanta.

Bibb - Alfred V. Gardner; wounded at Resaca and Franklin.

Shelby - Samuel Abernethy.

Blount - B.F. Sapp; died in service. T.J. Smitherman.

Barbour - John F. Wagnon; resigned. John A. Forster; wounded at Resaca; captured at Nashville.

Bibb - Hugh Latham; died in the service. Berry G. Brown; killed at Nashville.

Conecuh - J.B. Sowell; died in the service. Ulee W. Mills; killed at Atlanta. John B. Allen; killed at Franklin.

Barbour - John C. McNab; resigned. J.C. Hailey; killed at Atlanta. Benjamin H. Screws; wounded at Atlanta.

Thirtieth Alabama

The Thirtieth was organized at Talladega April 16, 1862, and reported for duty at once to Chattanooga. Sent further into east Tennessee, it was brigaded under Gen. Reynolds of Tennessee, then under Gen. Stevenson. The regiment skirmished at Tazewell and Cumberland Gap, and moved into Kentucky, but was not engaged. On the return to Tennessee, the Thirtieth was brigaded with the Twentieth, Twenty-third, Thirty-first, and Forty-sixth Alabama, under Gen. Tracy of Madison, and in December was sent to Vicksburg with the other portions of Stevenson's division. In the spring the regiment fought with few casualties at Port Gibson, but was bathed in blood at Baker's Creek, where it lost 229 men killed, wounded, and missing - half of its number - and had four ensigns killed, and its colors rent by 63 balls and 16 shell fragments. Pent up in Vicksburg, the Thirtieth suffered severely in casualties during the siege, and was captured with the fortress. Paroled, the regiment recruited at Dempolis, and proceeded, with other portions of the brigade - now under Gen. Pettus of Dallas - to the main army near Chattanooga. The regiment was engaged without loss at Mission Ridge, and wintered at Dalton. At Rocky-face the Thirtieth suffered severely, and lightly at Resaca. From there to Atlanta its tattered colors floated at the front of the fire-tried Army of Tennessee, the regiment losing heavily at New Hope, Atlanta, and Jonesboro. Proceeding into Tennessee, the Thirtieth was cut up at Nashville, but was part of the rear guard back to Duck River. Transferred to North Carolina, the regiment fought at Kinston and Bentonville, suffering severely in casualties. With the army the Thirtieth surrendered at Greensboro, North Carolina, about 100 men being present for duty.

Field and Staff

Colonels - Charles M. Shelley of Talladega; promoted. James K. Elliot of Talladega; wounded at Bentonville.

Lieutenant Colonels - Taul Bradford of Talladega; resigned. A.J. Smith of Jefferson; killed at Vicksburg. John C. Francis of Calhoun; killed at Rocky-face. Thomas Patterson of Talladega; killed at Atlanta. James K. Elliot; promoted. Wm. H. Burr of St. Clair.

Majors - A.J. Smith; promoted. William Patterson of Talladega; wounded at Baker's Creek; resigned. John C. Francis; promoted. Thomas Patterson; promoted. James K. Elliot; promoted. Wm. H. Burr; promoted.

Adjutant - Wm. W. Houston of Talladega; wounded at Baker's Creek.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Shelby - C.G. Samuels; resigned. B.F. Samuels; resigned.

Shelby and Jefferson - .... Deshazo; resigned. J.M. Acton.

Talladega - Wm. Patterson; promoted. Henry Oden; killed at Vicksburg. .... Peacock; killed at Bentonville.

Talladega - David Anderson; killed at Baker's Creek. D. C. McCain.

Talladega - John Sawyer; resigned. James K. Elliot; wounded at Rocky-face; promoted. W.T. Webb.

Calhoun - John C. Francis; promoted. .... McCain.

Calhoun - Henry McBee; resigned. Samuel Kelly.

St. Clair - E.P. Woodward; resigned. Wm. H. Burr; wounded; promoted.

Talladega - Thomas Patterson; wounded at Port Gibson; promoted. Wm. S. McGhee; killed at Atlanta.

Randolph - Jack Derrett; killed near Atlanta. Lieutenant Stephens commanded.

Thirty-First Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Talladega, in April 1861, and reported to Gen. Leadbetter at Chattanooga shortly after. It then moved up to Knoxville, where it was brigaded under Gen. Barton, Stevenson's division. The regiment was at the investment of Cumberland Gap, and took part in the fight at Tazewell. With Gen. E.K. Smith's column it was in the Kentucky campaign, without coming up with the enemy. When the forces came back, it was permanently brigaded with the Twentieth, Twenty-third, Thirtieth, and Forty-sixth Alabama, and under Gen. Tracy of Madison. In December, the Thirty-first accompanied Stevenson's division to Vicksburg. In May 1863 it was initiated into the sternest duties of war at Port Gibson, where the regiment suffered severely. It fought at Baker's Creek, and the loss was very heavy. As part of the garrison of Vicksburg, the regiment shared in the dangers and privations of that siege, and, after losing a number killed and wounded, was surrendered with the fortress. Placed in parole camp at Demopolis, the Thirty-first was soon exchanged. With Gen. Pettus in command of the brigade, the regiment joined the army of Tennessee, and was engaged with slight loss at Mission Ridge. It wintered at Dalton, and in the memorable campaign from Dalton to Atlanta it bore a full share in the dangers and hardships which have made it a bloody but proud page in Southern annals. It followed Gen. Hood into Tennessee, and after sustaining severe losses at Columbia and Nashville, was the rear-guard of the retreating army. Transferred to North Carolina, the regiment was hotly engaged at Bentonville, and a fragment of the 1100 with which it entered the service stacked arms at Greensboro, as part of Pettus' brigade.

Field and Staff

Colonels - Daniel R. Hundley of Madison; wounded and captured at Port Gibson; captured at Big Shanty, Ga.

Lieut. Colonel - Thomas M. Arrington of Montgomery.

Major - G.W. Mattison of Shelby; wounded at New Hope.

Adjutants - Joseph J. Nix of Talladega; transferred to line. John W. Shorter of Georgia; captured at Baker Creek; resigned. Wm. M. Garrard of Georgia.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Cherokee - Isaac Moragne; resigned. .... Pickens; resigned. W.L. Hughes; wounded at Jonesboro.

Cherokee - Marshall Alexander; resigned. J.J. Nix; wounded and captured at Baker's Creek; wounded at Jonesboro. Lieut. Bagley commanded; killed at Bentonville.

Shelby - James Cobb; resigned. .... Shelby resigned. Robert Pruitt.

Calhoun - E. Thompson; resigned. Jorn Ross.

Talladega - .... Carter; resigned. G.W. Watts; resigned; F.M. Shouse.

Talladega - Robert McKibben.

Talladega - Wm. S. Chapman; resigned. Robert A. Hardie; resigned. W.H. Hancock; transferred. W.J. Rhodes; wounded at Kinston and Bentonville.

Randolph - Augustus A. West; resigned. Andrew Reeves; resigned. James L. Williams; captured at Mission Ridge.

Montgomery - John M. Shields; resigned. S.L. Arrington; died in the service. L.W. Vick.

Shelby - J.L. Reeves; made surgeon. John W. Pitts; resigned. Samuel Morgan; resigned. J. McClanahan.

Thirty-Second Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Mobile, in April 1862, and three months later proceeded to Tennessee. It was first under fire at Bridgeport, where it forded the Tennessee in the face of the enemy. Shortly after, the regiment captured Stevenson, with valuable stores. It operated in the middle of Tennessee, part of the time under Gen. Forrest, and was surprised and overpowered at Lavergne, losing a number of prisoners. Placed in Gen. D.W. Adams' brigade, the Thirty-second fought with severe loss at Murfreesboro. Having wintered at Tullahoma, the regiment was part of the force sent to Mississippi to the relief of Vicksburg. It was in the trenches at Jackson, and, without loss, repulsed an assault in the enemy, 260 of whose dead were counted and buried in front of its position. Two or three months later, the Thirty-second rejoined the Army of Tennessee, and participated in the battle of Chicamauga with small loss. It was then transferred from Adams' brigade to that of Gen. Clayton of Barbour, and consolidated with the Fifty-eighth Alabama, where its further record will be found.

Field and Staff

Colonel - Alexander McKinstry of Mobile; relieved.

Lieut. Colonel - Harry Maury of Mobile; captured at Lavergne; wounded at Murfreesboro and Jackson; transferred.

Majors - Thos. P. Ashe of Washington; resigned. Thos. S. Easton of Mobile; resigned. John C. Kimball of Clarke; relieved.

Adjutant - John L. Chandler of Mobile; relieved.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Washington - R.L. Bowling; wounded at Murfreesboro; relieved.

Mobile - John Drew; resigned. Charles H. Garner; resigned. Hinson H. Smith; resigned. H. McF. Tatum; died in the service.

Mobile and Baldwin - Thos. S. Easton; promoted. Benj. H. Smoot; relieved.

Wilcox and Clarke - John Creagh; resigned. George W. Cox; wounded at New Hope.

Clarke - Alexander Kilpatrick; resigned.

Mobile, Washington, and Chocta - H.S. Smith; resigned. Thomas S. Fry; wounded near Dalton; transferred.

Clarke and Washington - J.C. Kimball; promoted. S.T. Taylor.

Clarke - John W. Bell; died in the service.

Mobile, Tuskaloosa, and Fayette - Walter Thompson; detached.

Mobile - J. McF. Cleveland; resigned. W.B. Grist.

Thirty-Third Alabama

Infantry Regiment

The Thirty-third was organized at Pensacola in April 1862, and proceeded to Corinth just after the battle of Shiloh. Placed in the brigade commanded by Col. Hawthorn of Arkansas, the regiment remained at Tupelo till the Kentucky campaign was entered on. It was part of the brigade of Gen. Wood of Lauderdale, and in Buckner's division, and was present at the capture of Mumfordsville. At Perryville the Thirty-third received its first terrible lesson in the horrors of battle, for it entered that conflict about 500 strong, and came out with 88 rank and file, the others having fallen in the bloody struggle. It came out of Kentucky with the army, and at Murfeesboro the loss of the regiment was comparatively large, for it was in Cleburne's division. The remainder of the winter was spent in camps near Tullahoma, and the regiment retired behind the Tennessee during the summer. In the grand forward movement on the enemy's line at Chicamauga, the Thirty-third suffered very heavily. Gen. M.P. Lowery of Mississippi having relieved Gen. Wood of the command of the brigade - Sixteenth, Thirty-third Mississippi regiments, and Gibson's (Ala.) and Newman's (Tenn.) battalions - the Thirty-third was effectively engaged at Mission Ridge without loss. It was part of the wall of fire that checked the exultant federals at Ringgold Gap, where it lost but one man. The regiment passed the winter at Dalton, and was in the incessant battle from there to Atlanta, fighting during the day and entrenching at night, and losing many by the casualties of battle, particularly at New Hope, and around Atlanta. Having followed Gen. Hood into Tennessee, it moved to the assault of the enemy's works at Franklin, with 285 men, and lost over two-thirds of them, mostly killed. Transferred to North Carolina, the Thirty-third took part in the operations there, and a remnant was there surrendered.

Field and Staff

Colonels - Samuel Adams of Butler; wounded at Perryville; killed at Kennesa. Robert F. Crittenden of Coffee; captured at Nashville.

Lieutenant Colonels - Isaac H. Corn of Coffee; resigned. R.F. Crittenden; promoted. James H. Dunklin of Butler.

Majors - R.F. Crittenden; promoted. James H. Dunklin; wounded at Chicamauga; promoted.

Adjutants - John Crosby of Stallworth of Conecuh; died at Tupelo. A.M. Moore of Greene; killed at Chicamauga. Willis J. Milner of Butler.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Butler - James H. Dunklin; promoted. Wm. E. Dodson; killed at Kennesa. Charles S. Linthicum.

Dale - W.E. Cooper; killed by railroad disaster. Charles H. Bryant; wounded at Murfreesboro.

Montgomery - John C. Norman; resigned. Charles Waller; wounded at Murfreesboro; resigned. Joseph Wilson.

Covington - W. N. Brandon.

Dale - W.E. Cooper; killed by railroad disaster. Needham Hughes; captured at Nashville.

Coffee - M.C. Kinney*; wounded at Perryville.

Butler - Thomas G. Pou; resigned. John F. Barganier; resigned. Wm. S. Sims; killed at Chicamauga. John Gamble; wounded at New Hope and Columbus.

*This name was misspelled in Brewer's history of the 33rd Infantry Regiment. According ADAH Civil War Service Cards and a descendant of his, the correct name is Mason Creed Kimmey.

Thirty-Fourth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Loachapoka, April 15, 1862. It went thence to Tupelo, and was placed - with the Twenty-fourth and Twenty-eight Alabama, and two South Carolina regiments - in Manigault's brigade, Wither's division. The regiment moved into Kentucky, but was not under fire during the campaign. It was with the main army when it took position at Murfreesboro, and lost very heavily on its first battlefield. The remainder of the winter was passed near Tullahoma, and the Thirty-fourth withdrew with the army to the Chattanooga line. At Chicamauga the regiment again lost largely in killed and wounded, and at Mission Ridge many of its number were captured. It wintered and recruited for the great campaign of 1864 at Dalton, and began "The Hundred Days' Battle" in the spring. From Dalton to Atlanta, the Thirty-fourth shared fully in the operations of the historic Army of Tennessee, and in the battles of Jully 22d and July 28th at Atlanta its losses were particularly large. At Jonesboro its casualties were few, but then came the expedition into Tennessee, and though the Thirty-fourth escaped the severest part of the battle of Franklin, at Nashville its already depleted ranks were almost swept away. With the wreck of the army it passed into the Carolinas, where it skirmished at Kinston and lost severely at Bentonville. Consolidated with the Twenty-fourth and Twenty-eighth, about 100 of the 1000 men with which the Thirty-fourth took the field were surrendered at High Point, North Carolina.

Field and Staff

Colonel - Julius C.B. Mitchell of Montgomery; detached.

Lieutenant Colonels - James W. Echols of Macon; resigned. J.C. Carter of Montgomery; wounded at Murfreesboro.

Majors - Henry McCoy of Tallapoosa; resigned. John N. Slaughter of Coosa; wounded at Atlanta.

Adjutants - John E. Burch of Montgomery; captured at Nashville. James P. Brenan of Montgomery.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Coosa and Montgomery - Thomas Mitchell; resigned. R.G. Welch; wounded at Chicamauga.

Coosa - John N. Slaughter; promoted. E.B. Wood; captured at Mission Ridge. Lieut. M. Lambert commanded.

Coosa - Jas. M. Willis; resigned. W.G. Oliver; wounded at Jonesboro.

Tallapoosa - W.H. Holstein; wounded.

Tallapoosa - M.F. Fielder; resigned. John R. Colquitt; wounded at Atlanta.

Tallapoosa - J. Frank Ashurst; resigned. Henry J. Ricks.

Tallapoosa - .... Pinckard; resigned. J. Maxey Smith; wounded at Atlanta.

Montgomery - John C. Carter; promoted. Lieut. F.H. Cobb commanded.

Russell - J.B. Bickerstaff; killed at Murfreesboro. John S. Burch; wounded at Atlanta.

Russell - Henry M. Crowder; resigned. William Johnson; resigned. Joseph M. Simms.

Thirty-Fifth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

The Thirty-fifth organized at Lagrange, in Franklin, April 1862. Ordered to Corinth, it was there brigaded under Gen. Breckinridge. It followed that officer to Louisiana, and took part in the attack on Baton Rouge, losing quite a number. It was part of the force with which Van Dorn assaulted Corinth, and the Thirty-fifth was a severe loser in the casualties of that fierce struggle. Placed under Gen. Buford, the regiment was under fire at the first bombardment of Port Hudson. It passed some time in that vicinity, and in May 1863 the regiment was engaged at Baker's Creek with light loss. Escaping the perils of Vicksburg by following Gen. Loring out of the battle, the Thirty-fifth was soon after sent to the Army of Tennessee; but in February 1864 went back to Mississippi to confront Sherman's advance. The regiment was now in the brigade of Gen. T.B. Scott of Louisiana, consisting of the Twenty-seventh, Forty-ninth, Fifty-fifth, and Fifty-seventh Alabama, and Twelfth Louisiana. Rejoining the Army of Tennessee, the Thrity-fifth was part of the resolute column that stood in front of Sherman's army during the great struggle in north Georgia, and in the bloody and fruitless sacrifices made before the gates of Atlanta. During that time it lost largely, 65 being killed or wounded July 22 at Atlanta, and 27 on the 28th folowing. The regiment moved into Tennessee with Gen. Hood, and was in the advance in the attack on the outpost at Decatur, where it lost 35 killed and wounded. At the bloody shambles of Franklin, the Thirty-fifth lost 150 killed and wounded, or one-half its effective force. The loss at Nashville was light, and the remnant of the regiment proceeded eastward to renew the then hopeless struggle in the Carolinas. The Thirty-fifth was surrendered with the Army of Tennessee.

Field and Staff

Colonels - James W. Robinson of Franklin; resigned. Edwin Goodwin of Franklin; died in the service. Samuel S. Ives of Lauderdale; wounded at Franklin.

Lieutenant Colonels - Edwin Goodwin; promoted. Samuel S. Ives; promoted. A.E. Ashford of Lawrence.

Majors Wm. Hunt of Franklin; transferred. S.S. Ives; promoted. A.E. Ashford; promoted. John S. Dickson of Madison; killed at Franklin.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Lawrence - Richard O. Picket; captured at Corinth; resigned. Ezekiel Johnson.

Lauderdale - W.B. Taylor; resigned. J.B. Patton; wounded at Franklin.

Lawrence - A.E. Ashford; promoted. . . . . . . Tathem.

Lauderdale - Samuel S. Ives; wounded at Baton Rouge; promoted. J.R. Mitchell; wounded at Corinth.

Limestone - John West.

Limestone - L.N. Martin.

Madison - John S. Dickson; promoted. Joseph Brown.

Madison - . . . . Peavy; resigned. J.A. Flanagan.

Franklin - Thaddeus Felton; killed at Corinth. John Harris; died in the service. Sam'l D. Stewart; killed at Franklin.

Franklin - Red Jones.

Thirty-Sixth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

The Thirty-sixth was organized at Mount Vernon Arsenal, May 12, 1862. It remained there a month, then aided in the construction of the defences at Oven and Chocta Bluffs. From August 1862, to April 1863, the regiment remained in Mobile, whence it went to Tullahoma. It was there brigaded under Gen. Clayton of Barbour, with the Eigthteenth, Thirty-eight, and Thirty-second-Fifty-eight Alabama regiments, Stewart's divison. The Thirty-sixth fell back with the army, and participated at Chicamauga with a loss of 125 killed and wounded. Its loss was light at Lookout, but large in casualties and prisoners at Mission Ridge. The regiment wintered at Dalton, and was engaged at Crow's Valley, Rocky-face, Resaca, New Hope, the Atlanta battles, and the skirmishing interludes, losing about 300 men by the casualties of battle from the time it left Dalton. At Jonesboro the regiment was again warmly engaged, and lost 25 per centum of its force present. Having accompanied General Hood to Middle Tennessee, the Thirty-sixth lost about 60 men at Nashville, and came out of there as an organized body. The regiment, with the other regiments of Holtzclaw's brigade, was then placed on garrison duty at Spanish Fort, and during that memorable siege lost 110 men killed, wounded, and captured. It was part of the force surrendered at Meridian, in April 1865. The Thirty-sixth went into line of battle at Dalton, May 7, 1864, with 460 muskets, and, within the eleven months that followed, lost 470 men and 21 officers, chiefly killed and wounded.

Field and Staff

Colonels - Robert H. Smith of Mobile; resigned. Lewis T. Woodruff of Mobile; wounded at New Hope; retired. Thomas H. Herndon of Greene.

Lieutenant Colonels - Lewis T. Woodruff; promoted. Thomas H. Herndon; wounded at Chicamauga, and Atlanta; promoted.

Majors - Thomas H. Herndon; promoted. Charles S. Hennegan of Sumter; captured at Mission Ridge.

Adjutants - Thomas A. Hatch of Greene; resigned. Robert T. Harkness of Greene.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Sumter - Charles S. Hennegan; promoted. John M. Quarles; resigned. James T. Meek.

Greene - Nathan M. Carpenter.

Greene - James A Wemyss; wounded at Atlanta; resigned. Lieut. W.N. Knight commanded.

Tuskaloosa and Fayette - John C. Adams; wounded at Mission Ridge; retired. John M. Walker; killed at Resaca. Lieut. Wm. M. Owen commanded.

Mobile - John G. Cleveland; killed at Chicamauga. Washington Lott; wounded at Resaca.

Monroe - John Deloach; resigned. D.W. Kelly; killed at Mission Ridge. Wm. S. Wiggins; wounded at Jonesboro.

Monroe - Malcolm Patterson; resigned. John B. Jordan; captured at Atlanta. David T. McCants.

Greene - James W.A. Wright; wounded and captured at Mission Ridge.

State of Mississippi - Mathew Calvert; resigned. Welles Thompson.

Tuskaloosa - Andrew J. Derby; resigned. H.A. Farish; captured at Spanish Fort.

Thirty-Seventh Alabama

Infantry Regiment

The Thirty-seventh was organized at Auburn, in the spring of 1862, under the requisition of President Davis for 12,000 more Alabamians. Ordered to Columbus, Miss., after a short time the regiment proceeded to Tupelo. There it was placed in Little's division, and in the brigade of Col. Martin of Tennessee, with three Mississippi regiments; but Gen. D.H. Maury succeeded Gen. Little, when the latter was killed at Iuka, where the Thirty-seventh was first engaged, with some loss. The regiment took part in the battle of Corinth, losing heavily in casualties. Its brigade commander fell at Corinth, and the Thirty-seventh was thrown into a brigade with the Second Texas, and Forty-second Alabama, Hen. John C. Moore commanding. The winter was spent in Mississippi, - the regiment retreating Holly Springs, and taking part in the repulse of the invaders at Chicasa Bayou. Early in 1863 the Thirty-seventh was sent to the Sunflower River, but went back in time to take part in the battles of Port Gibson and Baker's Creek, where its losses were severe. The regiment was then a portion of the garrison of the Vicksburg, and shared in the perils of that siege, where it was captured with the fortress. Exchanged soon after, the regiment was in parole camp at Demopolis. Ordered to the Army of Tennessee, it lost heavily at Lookout Mountain, and quite a number at Mission Ridge. The winter was passed at Dalton, where Gen. Baker of Barbour took charge of the brigade. At Mill-creek Gap, Resaca, Noonday Creek, Kennesa, and the series of battles around Atlanta, the colors of the Thirty-seventh floated at the front, as its long list of casualties shows. In one charge at Atlanta, July 22, its commander and 40 men were killed outright, out of 300 men present. During the fall and winter, the Thirty-seventh was on garrision duty at Spanish Fort, but moved into North Carolina. It broke the enemy's line at Bentonville, and furled its tattered banner a few days later, with 300 of its number present of the 1100 with which it took the field.

Field and Staff

Colonels - James F. Dowdell of Chambers; captured at Vicksburg; retired.

Lieutenant Colonels - A.A. Greene of Chambers; wounded at Iuka and Mission Ridge; killed at Atlanta. W.F. Slaton of Macon.

Majors - John P.W. Amorine of Pike; transferred. W. F. Slaton; wounded at Corinth; captured at Lookout Mountain; promoted. Joel C. Kendrick of Covington.

Adjutants - John C. Meadows of Chambers; transferred. Thomas L. Samford of Macon.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Henry - Moses B. Greene; wounded at Corinth.

Tallapoosa - John O. Davis; wounded at Corinth; resigned. James H. Johnson; wounded at Atlanta.

Pike - Joel C. Kendrick; wounded at Corinth and Atlanta.

Macon and Russell - W.F. Slaton; promoted. Jeptha J. Padgett; wounded.

Henry - J.L. Skipper; resigned. Joel G. Greene; wounded at Atlanta.

Pike - C. Pennington; wounded at Resaca.

Chambers - W.W. Meadows; killed at Corinth. S.M. Robertson; wounded; resigned. C.E. Evans; wounded at Resaca and Atlanta.

Barbour and Henry - Marion C.J. Searcy; wounded at Corinth; killed at Mission Ridge. H.F. Reynolds.

Chambers - James J. Talbot; resigned. T.J. Griffin.

Pike - J.M. Leach; killed at New Hope. Geo. H. Chatfield.

 

Thirty-Ninth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Opelika in May 1862, and proceeded at once to Mississippi. It was there brigaded under Gen. Frank Gardner, with the Nineteenth, Twenty-second, Twenty-fifth, and Twenty-sixth Alabama regiments. It participated in the weary march into Kentucky, and came back with the army to Murfreesboro. The regiment took part in that battle, and with heavy loss in casualties, having gained much credit for repulsing an attack of the enemy the day before. The regiment was with the army when it fell back to the Chattanooga line, and took part in the battle of the Chicamauga with a very heavy loss of men. At Mission Ridge the loss was light, and the Thirty-ninth, now under Gen. Deas of Mobile as brigade commander, wintered at Dalton. From there to Atlanta the regiment was a conspicuous actor in all the fighting of the army, suffering severely. And when, under Gen. Hood the fate of the Confederacy was risked on the "iron dice of battle," in the trenches of Atlanta, and at Jonesboro, the ranks of the Thirty-ninth were thinned sadly by the casualties of those desperate struggles. It marched with the army into Tennessee, and lost a number of prisoners at Nashville. Emerging from that train of disasters, the regiment rallied to the call of Gen. Johnston in the Carolinas, and took part in the operations there, though reduced to a bare skeleton. It was there consolidated with the Twenty-second and Twenty-sixth-Fiftieth Alabama, but was surrendered a few days later.

Field and Staff

Colonels - Henry D. Clayton of Barbour; promoted. Whitfield Clarke of Barbour.

Lieutenant Colonels - James T. Flewellen of Barbour; resigned. Whitfield Clarke; promoted. Lemuel Hargroves of Barbour; resigned. W.C. Clifton of Russell.

Majors - Whitfield Clarke; promoted. L. Hargroves; resigned. W.C. Clifton; promoted. J.D. Smith of Barbour; killed at Jonesboro.

Adjutants - J.M. Macon of Barbour; transferred. H.B. Tompkins of Barbour.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Pike - J.W.W. Jackson; resigned. J.P. Nall; wounded; retired. .... Roberts; killed in North Carolina.

Barbour - Lemuel Hargroves; promoted. T.J. Cox.

Barbour - Calvin McSwean; resigned. J.A. Miller.

Henry - Lee A. Jennings; wounded at Murfreesboro; resigned. A.J. Cassady.

Russell - W.C. Clifton; promoted.

The State of Georgia - A.H. Flewellen; resigned. Willis Banks; killed near Atlanta.

Henry and Barbour - T.Q. Stanford; killed at Murfreesboro; C.H.Mathews; killed at Peach-tree Creek.

Barbour - Joseph C. Clayton; killed at Murfreesboro; J.L. McRae.

Barbour - Whitfield Clarke; promoted. J.D. Smith; promoted. Wm. H. Dill.

Barbour - J.C. Mitchell; resigned. Thomas J. Brannon.

Fortieth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized in May 1862 at Mobile, and remained there till December. It then moved to Vicksburg, and took part in the operations on Deer Creek. While in that region, it was brigaded with the Thirty-seventh, and Forty-second Alabama, and Second Texas, under Gen. Moore. Four companies were placed in Fort Pemberton, and were from there transferred to Gen. Bragg's army, and fought at Chicamauga. The other companies of the Fortieth were part of the garrison of Vicksburg, suffered severely, and were there captured. The regiment was united near Mission Ridge, and took part in that battle, and at Look-out Mountain, but with light loss. Having passed the winter at Dalton, where Gen. Baker took command of the brigade, the Fortieth took part in the campaign from there to Atlanta, losing largely, especially at New Hope. When the army marched back to Tennessee, in company with the other regiments of Baker's brigade, the Fortieth was sent to Mobile, and was on garrison duty there for some months. In January 1865, the regiment proceeded with the remainder of the army to North Carolina, and shared in the operations, fighting at Bentonville with severe loss. Consolidated with the Nineteenth and Forty-sixth, the Fortieth was shortly after surrendered at Yadkin River bridge.

Field and Staff

Colonels - Augustus A. Coleman of Sumter; resigned. John H. Higley of Mobile; captured at Vicksburg.

Lieutenant Colonels - John H. Higley; promoted. Thos. Stone of Pickens; died in the service. Ezekiel Gully of Sumter.

Majors* - Thomas Stone; promoted. Ezekiel Gully; promoted. E.D. Willet of Pickens.

Adjutant - Clarence H. Ellerbee; killed at Bentonville.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Sumter - Ezekiel Gully; promoted. James Cobbs; resigned. Samuel H. Sprott.

Pickens - E.D. Willet; promoted. James A. Latham; killed at Bentonville.

Sumter - W.A.C. Jones; captured at Vicksburg; transferred. Thomas M. Brunson; resigned. James W. Monette.

Chocta - Abraham G. Campbell.

Pickens - Thomas Stone; promoted. J. Henderson Pickens; captured at Vicksburg.

Chocta - Edward Marsh; killed at Dalton.

Chocta - Thos. Wilkes Coleman; captured at Vicksburg. Lieut. Jo. Knighton commanded.

Perry - C.C. Crowe; detached. Lieut. Hicks commanded.

Sumter - Andrew M. Moore; captured at Vicksburg.

Covington - Hiram Gant.

*Devereux Hopkins of Chocta was elected major, but did not accept.

Forty-First Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized in May 1862, and soon after proceeded to Chattanooga. It operated in middle Tennessee some months, then joined the army of Tennessee soon after its return from the Kentucky campaign. It was initiated into tho harsh realities of war when "stormed at with shot and shell," as part of Hanson's devoted brigade, at Murfreesboro; and on that fatal field left its brigadier and 198 of its dead and wounded. The regiment then remained at Tullahoma till ordered to Mississippi with the other portions of Breckinridge's division. It was engaged in the operations for the relief of Vicksburg, and in the trenches of Jackson. Having rejoined the Army of Tennessee, the Forty-first was in the forward movement at Chicamauga, and in the fierce struggle over the enemy's fortified position, left its brigade commander (Gen. Helm of Kentucky) and 189 men on the bloody field. The regiment was shortly after transferred to the brigade of Gen. Gracie of Mobile--Forty-third, Fifty-ninth, and Sixtieth Alabama, and Stallworth's battalion. As part of Longstreet's corps, the Forty-first participated in the bloody struggles and severe privations of the winter campaign in east Tennessee, sustaining much loss. The regiment reached Virginia in April 1864, and was engaged in the battle of Drewry's Bluff and Dutch Gap. It was then in the protracted siege at Petersburg, and in the bloody battles around that city. The regiment was also very hotly engaged at Hatcher's Run, and in the fighting on the retreat to Appomattox; and was there fighting under the matchless Lieut. Gen. Gordon, when the flag of truce appeared. About 270 of its number were there present for duty, under Col. Stansel. Of 1454 names on its rolls, about 130 were killed, about 370 died of disease, and 135 were transferred or discharged.

Field and Staff

Colonels.- Henry Talbird of Perry; resigned. M.L. Stansel of Pickens; wounded at Murfreesboro.

Lieutent Colonels.- J. T. Murfee of Tuskaloosa; resigned. M. L. Stansel; promoted. T. G. Trimmier of Tuskaloosa; killed at White-oaks Road.

Majors.- M. L. Stansel; promoted. T. G. Trimmier; promoted. Jesse G. Nash of Pickens; resigned. L. D. Hudgins of Tuskaloosa; killed at Petersburg. J. M. Jeffries of Pickens.

Adjutant.- J. D. Leland.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Tuskaloosa.- T. G. Trimmier; promoted. H. H. Sartain.

Pickens.- J. C. Kirkland; resigned. L. F. Shelton.

Pickens.- J. G. Nash; promoted. J. H. Cason; wounded at Beene's Station; resigned; John C. Moorhead.

Pickens.-Robert H. McCord; died in the service. B. A. Hudgins; wounded at Murfreesboro; resigned. John C. Fair.

Perry and Greene.- Wm. G. England; resigned. A. B. S. Moseley.

Tuskaloosa.-B. F.Eddins; resigned. L. M. Clements; wounded at Chicamauga.

Tuskaloosa.-L. T. Hudgins; promoted. James White.

Fayette.- F. Ogden; resigned. H. M. Bell; wounded at Hatcher's Run.

Pickens.- Thos. S. Abernethy; resigned. Jhon M. Jeffries; promoted. J. T. Harkins.

Pickens.- James N. Craddock; resigned. James Halbert.

Forty-Second Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Columbus, Miss., in May 1862, and was composed principally of men who re-organized, in two or three instances as entire companies, after serving a year as the Second Alabama Infantry. The regiment joined Generals Price and Van Dorn at Ripley in September, and was brigaded under Gen. John C. Moore of Texas. A month later the Forty-second went into the battle of Corinth with 700 men, and lost 98 killed and about 250 wounded and captured in the fighting at and near that place. It wintered in Mississippi, Moore's brigade being re-organized with the Thirty-seventh, Fortieth, and Forty-second Alabama, and Second Texas regiments. It was part of the garrison of Vicksburg, and lost 10 killed and about 95 wounded there, and the remainder captured at the surrender of the fortress. The Forty-second was in parole camp at Demoplis, then joined the Army of Tennessee. It fought with severe loss at Lookout and Mission Ridge, and wintered at Dalton. Gen. Baker of Barbour then took command of the brigade, which was in Clayton's (Stewart's) division, Polk's corps. In the spring the Forty-second fought at Resaca with a loss of 59 killed and wounded. It was then continually skirmishing till the battle of New Hope, where its loss was comparatively light, as it was at Atlanta the 22d of July. On the 28th of July the loss was very heavy, and the ranks of the regiment were fearfully thinned by the casualties of battle. A few days later the regiment was sent to Spanish Fort, where it remained on garrison duty during the fall, and till January 1865. It then moved into North Carolina, and its colors floated in the thickest of the battle at Bentonville, and were furled at the capitulation of that army.

Field and Staff

Colonel - John W. Portis of Clarke; wounded at Corinth; resigned. T. C.. Lanier of Pickens; wounded at New Hope.

Lieut. Colonels - Thomas C. Lanier; wounded at Corinth; promoted.

Majors - W.C. Fergus of Mobile; captured at Missionary Ridge.

Adjutants - Thomas J. Portis of Dallas; resigned. Thos. Gaillard of Mobile.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Monroe-George W. Foster; killed at Corinth. S. S. Gaillard; resigned. D. W. Rankin.

Pickens- Robert Best; died in the service. Robert K. Wells; killed at Atlanta. Burt Upchurch.

Wilcox- Wm. D. McNeil; made lieutenant colonel of the consolidated regiments in North Carolina.

Pickens- T.C. Brady; wounded at Lookout Mountian; resigned. ... Hendrix.

Fayette- J. B. Perkins; resigned. Charles R. Labuzan.

Talladega-Alexander B. Knox; killed at Corinth. J. R. Stockdale.

Monroe- W. B. Kemp; resigned E. G. Riley; wounded at Corinth; resigned. Geo. H. Gray, wounded at New Hope.

Mobile - Charles Briggs; resigned. John W. Haley; died of wounds received at Corinth. R. C. Reeder.

Marion - ... Condrey; wounded at Corinth. Lieut. Thomas Condrey commanded.

Forty-Third Alabama

Infantry Regiment

The Forty-third was organized in May 1862 at Mobile. It was at once ordered to Chattanooga, and placed under Gen. Leadbetter. It moved into Kentucky in Gen. Kirby Smith's column, but was not actively engaged. Having passed the winter at Cumberland Gap, the regiment joined Gen. Bragg at Tullahoma being in a brigade under Gen. Grace -- the Forty-first, Forty-third, Fifty-ninth, and Sixtieth Alabama, and Stallworth's battalion. The regiment subsequently went back to east Tennessee, and operated there for some months Rejoining the main army, it passed through the iron hail of Chicamauga with very severe loss. As part of Longstreet's corps, the Forty-third was shortly after sent towards Knoxville, and took part in the investment there, with light loss. It was also in the fight at Beene's Station, but the casualties were few. Having passed through the bitter privations of the winter campaign in east Tennessee the regiment reached Gen. Beauregard at Petersburg in May 1864. When Sheridan swooped upon the outposts of Richmond, the Forty-third fought him with some loss. At the battle of Drewry's Bluff the regiment was hotly engaged, and lost severely in casualties. It was then in the trenches of Petersburg from June 1864 to the close, fighting cotinually and taking part in most of the battles that occurred by the attempts of the enemy to flank the onfederate line. At Appomattox the Forty-third, with the other portions of the brigade, had just driven back a line of the enemy, and taken a battery, when the capitulation of the army was announced. It surrendered as part of Moody's brigade, (Col. Stansel of Pickens commanding,) Bushrod Johnson's division, Gordon's corps, and about 50 men were present for duty. Of 1123 names on the rolls of the Forty-third, about 100 were killed, about 226 died of disease, and 161 were discharged or transferred.

Field and Staff

Colonels - Archibald Gracie of Mobile; promoted. Y. M. Moody of Marengo; wounded at Drewry's Bluff; promoted.

Lieut. Colonels - Young M. Moody; promoted. John J. Jolly of Greene; Wounded at Chicanauga.

Majors - John J. Jolly; promoted. R. D. Hart of Marengo; resigned. T. M. Barber of Tuskaloosa; resigned W. J. Mimms of Jefferson.

Adjutants - R. H. Henley of Marengo; resigned. John R. Shelton of Greene; killed near Richmond.. John L. Stephens of Greene wounded at Drewry's Bluff.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Marengo-- James R. Jones resigned. Oliver B. Prince; killed at Chicamauga. Quintus S. Adams; wounded at Drewry's Bluff.

Marengo -- R. D. Hart; promoted. W. W. Harder; wounded at Chicamauga. O. W. Pritchett killed at Drewry's Bluff.

Greene-- James A. Gordon; killed at Chicamauga. J. C. McAllilly; wounded near Richmond.

Tuskaloosa -- F. M. Barber; promoted. J. W. Mills.

Walker and Tuskaloosa -- W. H. Lawrence; resigned Nicholas P. Lawrence.

Jefferson -- W. J. Mimms; wounded at Chicamauga and near Richmond; promoted. Mortimer Jordan.

Marengo -- Joel S. Jones; resigned. Allen G. Watters.

Mobile -- E. H. Buck; wounded at Beene's Station; resigned. T. M. Hughes; killed at Petersburg. Winfield Wolf.

Tuskaloosa and Walker -- W. A. Fitts; resigned J. A. Sylvester; killed at Petersburg. E. F. Comegys.

Tuskaloosa and Walker -- H. Shepherd.

Forty-Fourth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

The Forty-fourth was organized at Selma, May 16, 1862, and reached Richmond the 1st of July. Attached to A. R. Wright's brigade, (Third, Twenty-second, and Forty-eighth Georgia,) R. H. Anderson's division, the regiment was a very severe sufferer by disease, and went into the second battle of Manasses with 130 rank and file. It lost 5 killed and 22 wounded there, then took 113 rank and file into the battle, and lost 14 killed and 65 wounded of that number. The regiment wintered on the Rappahannock, and was placed in the brigade of Gen. Law of Macon--with the Fourth, Fifteenth, Forty-seventh, and Forty-eighth Alabama--Hood's division, Longstreet's corps. At Fredericksburg the regiment was under fire, but with light loss, and in the spring was at the battle of Suffolk with the same fortune. The regiment moved into Pennsylvania, and in the terrible assault at Gettysburg, lost heavily, but captured the only two guns of the enemy's that were brought off the field by the Confederates. Transferred, a few weeks later, with the corps, to the West, the Forty-fourth lost largely in casualties at Chicamauga. It then shared the privations of the east Tennessee campaign, losing lightly at Lookout Valley, Knoxville, and Dandridge. The corps reached the Army of Northern Virginia in time to take part at the Wilderness and Spottsylvania, where the Forty-fourth's casualties were numerous. Its losses were light at Hanover Junction, the second Cold Harbor, and Bermuda Hundreds. Around Petersburg, and in the trenches of that city, the Forty-fourth was constantly engaged. It left there with the remnant of the army, and folded its colors at Appomattox, under Col. Jones. The Forty-fourth had 1094 names on its roll, of whom about 160 perished in battle, 200 died in the service, and 142 were discharged or transferred.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- James Kent of Dallas; resigned. Charles A. Derby of Lowndes; killed at Sharpsburg. Wm. F. Perry of Macon; promoted. John A. Jones of Bibb.

Lieut. Colonels -- C. A. Derby; promoted. W. F. Perry; promoted. J. A. Jones; promoted. G.W. Carey of Shelby.

Majors -- Wm. F. Perry; promoted. John A. Jones; promoted. George W. Carey; wounded near Richmond. A. W. Denman of Randolph.

Adjutants -T. A. Nicoll of Dallas; captured near Richmond.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Lowndes and Dallas — Richard J. Dudley; resigned. D. A. Bozeman; killed at Spottsylvania. D. B. Edwards.

Bibb -- John A. Jones promoted. L. D. Brown; resigned. Joab Goodson; died in the service. James M. Hill.

Wilcox.-- John W. Purifoy; wounded at Sharpsburg; retired. Robert Powers.

Shelby -- Wm. T. King; killed at second Mananas. T. L. Morrow; resigned. Jonas Oakes.

Shelby -- George W. Carey; promoted. John H. Neilson; killed at Spottsylvania. T. C. Ferguson.

Bibb -- Henley G. Sneed; resigned. Wm. N. Greene; wounded at Chicamauga; retired. John N. Fondreu.

Dallas and Bibb -- Thomas C. Daniel; killed; at second Manassas. Bluford Brown; resigned. Wm. T. Dunklin; killed at Gettysburg. W. P. Becker.

Bibb -- F. M. Goode; resigned. Joseph F. Johnston; wounded twice, once at Chicamauga.

Randolph -- A. W. Denman; promoted. John T. Tweedle.

Calhoun -- Patrick P. Riddle; died in the service. John M. Teague; killed at Gettysburg. John D. Adrian; wounded at the Wilderness; killed at Chaffin's Bluff. M. H. Fowler.

Forty-Fifth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Auburn, in May 1862 and proceeded at once to Corinth. At Tupelo it lost many men by disease, but in the autumn moved into Kentucky in Patton Anderson's brigade. It charged a battery at Perryville, and suffered very severely in casualties. The regiment came out of Kentucky with the army, and was soon after engaged in the battle of Murfreesboro, where its casualties were numerous. Placed in the brigade of Gen. Wood of Lauderdale, Cleburne's division, (with the Sixteenth, Twenty-sixth-Fiftieth, and Thirty-third Alabama), the Forty-fifth remained on duty with the Army of Tennessee, passing the first half of the year 1863 at Tullahoma. It fought under the eye of Cleburne at Chicamauga, and its mutilated ranks told the eloquent story of its services. Gen. Mark Lowery of Mississippi succeeded to the command of the brigade, and the Forty-fifth was present at Mission Ridge and Ringgold Gap with slight loss. The winter was passed at Dalton, and the regiment took a full share in the Dalton-Atlanta Campaign, especially at Resaca, and at New Hope, where Cleburne's division grappled with Logan's corps. On the 22d of July, at Atlanta, Death reveled in its ranks, and half the regiment went down on the hard-fought field. Six weeks later it again fought " where Cleburne crossed the line" at Jonesboro, with considerable loss. Then followed the long and disastrous march into Tennessee. The Forty-fifth opened the battle at Franklin the evening before by a brilliant fight at Springhill, and the next day was in the bloody and desperate assault of Cleburne's division on the enemy's works, and was almost annihilated around the corpse of its heroic division commander. Its colors floated before Nashville, and a remnant of the Fort-fifth moved into North Carolina. It was there consolidated with other Alabama regiments, and surrendered with Gen Johnston's forces.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- W. A Goodwin of Macon; resigned. James G. Gilchrist of Lowndes; resigned. E. B. Breedlove of Macon; resigned. Hams D. Lampley of Barbour; killed at Atlanta. Red H. Abercrombie of Macon.

Lieut. Colonels -- James G. Gilchrist; promoted. E. B. Breedlove; promoted. Harris D. Lampley promoted. R. H. Abercrombie; promoted. James Jackson of Macon.

Majors -- E. B. Breedlove; wounded at Murfreesboro; promoted. Hams D. Lampley; promoted. R. H. Abercrombie; promoted. George a. Freeman of Lowndes; wounded at Atlanta; retired. James Jackson; promoted.

Adjutants -- Lewis Chapman of Macon; transferred. Herndon Glenn of Barbour.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Barbour -- Harris D. Lampley; promoted. Jas. M. Hobdy; resigned Ellis Phelan.

Lowndes -- George C. Freeman; promoted. J. F. Clements; wounded at Murfreesboro; detached; Lieut. J. A. Robertson commanded.

Macon -- Thos. F. Flournoy; resigned .... Gaffney; killed at Perryville. John Callier.

Barbour and Macon -- G. W. Carter; resigned. J. C. Caldwell.

Macon -- James Jackson; wounded at Atlanta; promoted. S. W. King.

Russell. -- .... Tucker; resigned. .... Crockett.

Macon.-James M. Simmons; resigned. John R. Carson; killed at Franklin

Macon -- R. H. Abercrombie; promoted. Thomas Smith; killed at Atlanta. John E. Jones; wounded at Spring Hill.

M acon -- L. M. Wilson; resigned. Barton Perry; wounded at Chicamauga and Franklin.

Russell -- ... Black; resigned. A. W. Torbert; wounded at Chicamauga.

Forty-Sixth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

The Forty-sixth was organized at Loachapoka, in the spring of 1862. Shortly after, it was sent to east Tennessee, and had several casualties in the fight at Tazewell. The regiment was in the weary march into Kentucky, in Stevenson's division, but did no fighting. When the army returned to Tennessee, the Forty-sixth was placed in a brigade with the Twentieth, Twenty-third, Thirtieth, and Thirty-first Alabama, under Gen. Tracy. In December, with all of Stevenson's division, the regiment was sent to Mississippi. In the battle of Port Gibson, where its brigadier fell, the regiment suffered severely. A few days later it was engaged at Baker's Creek, where its casualties were numerous, and where half the regiment was captured, including the field officers. The remainder were besieged in Vicksburg, suffering severely, and were captured with the fortress. Re-orgnized at Demopolis, with Gen. Pettus in command of the brigade, the Forty-sixth rejoined the Army of Tennessee. It lost considerably at Lookout Mountain and Mission Ridge, and made its winter quarters at Dalton. At Crow's Valley it was engaged, with several casualties. In the almost constant fighting from Dalton to Atlanta, the ranks of the Forty-sixth were thinned and at Jonesboro its list of casualties was large. Marching with Hood into Tennessee, it was one of the three regiments that made the brilliant fight at Columbia, where its loss was considerable. The Forty-sixth lost several killed and wounded at Nashville, and quite a number captured. It was the rear guard on the retreat, and the brigade was complimented by Gen. Hood in special orders for its services there. Transferred to North Carolina, the Forty-sixth was engaged at Kinston and Bentonville, with severe loss in the latter. Consolidated with the Twenty-third Alabama, with J. B. Bibb of Montgomery as colonel, (Col. Woods was transferred to the Nineteenth Alabama,) Osceola Kyle as lieutenant colonel, and J. T. Hester of Montgomery as major, the Forty-sixth was surrendered at Salisbury by Capt. Brewer, who had commanded it for two years.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- Mike L. Woods of Montgomery; captured at Baker's Creek.

Lieut. Colonels -- Osceola Kyle of Coosa; captured at Baker's Creek.

Majors -- James M. Handley of Randolph; captured at Baker's Creek.

Adjutants -- William S. Turner of Montgomery; resigned. Thomas Riggs of Dallas; killed at Baker's Creek. Lieut. House of Coosa, (acting,) killed at Vicksburg. A. J. Brooks of Coosa; wounded at Kennesa; Lient. George McFarland, (acting,) killed at Jonesboro.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Coosa -- George E. Brewer; captured at Vicksburg.

Coosa -- J. R. Cross; captured at Vicksburg.

Macon -- John F. Baggett; resigned. John F. Spinks; killed on Hood's retreat.

Macon -- C. L. Croft; resigned.

Montgomery -- Jas. W. Powell; captured at Baker's Creek.

Pike -- J. C. McGuire; resigned. ... McCaskill; killed at Baker's Creek.

Randolph -- Leonidas Stephens; died in the service. John C. Wright.

Randolph -- C. A. Allen; resigned. Wm. J. Samford.

Henry -- ....Wilson; resigned. L. L. Croft.

Forty-Seventh Alabama

Infantry Regiment

Organized at Loachapoka, May 22, 1862, the Forty-seventh reached Virginia late in June. Assigned to Gen. Stonewall Jackson's corps, the regiment was brigaded under General Taliaferro, with three Virginia regiments and the Forty-eighth Alabama. A few weeks later the regiment passed through the ordeal of battle at Cedar Run, where it lost 12 killed and 76 wounded, or nearly a third of its force present. At the second Manassas the Forty-seventh was again engaged, and lost 7 killed and 25 wounded. It was present at Chantilly and the capture of Harper's Ferry; entered the battle of Sharpsburg with 115 men, and lost every commissioned officer present on the field, mustering 17 men the next morning under a sergeant. The regiment wintered on the Rappahannock and witnessed the repulse of Burnside at Fredericksburg. Transferred to the brigade of Gen. Law -- Fourth, Fifteenth, Forty-fourth, Fifty-seventh, and Forty-eighth Alabama -- Hood's division, Longstreet's corps, the Forty-seventh lost several men in the fight at Suffolk. Rejoining the main army, the regiment marched into Pennsylvania, and poured out the blood of its bravest men at Gettysburg. Two months later the corps was transferred to north Georgia, and the Forty-seventh lost very severely at Chicamauga. It took part in the investment of Knoxville with light loss, and in the privations of the winter campaign in east Tennessee. Rejoining the Virginia army the regiment fought with severe loss at the Wilderness, and was in the brilliant charge on Warren's corps at Spottsylvania, where the brigade opened the battle. In all the subsequent operations around Richmond the regiment took part, and in the grim defences that begirt Petersburg it endured the perils and privations of the last sullen and persistent struggle. As part of Perry's brigade, the Forty-seventh laid down its arms at Appomattox, about 90 strong.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- Jas M. Oliver of Tallapoosa; resigned. Jas W. Jackson of Tallapoosa; wounded at Sharpsburg; resigned. Michael J. Bulger of Tallapoosa.

Lieut. Colonels -- James W. Jackson; resigned. M. J. Bulger wounded and captured at Gettysburg; promoted. L. B. Terrell; killed at Darbytown Road.

Majors -- John Y. Johnston of Tallapoosa; resigned. J. M. Campbell of Cherokee; killed near Richmond.

Adjutants -- Henry A. Garrett of Tallapoosa; wounded at second Manassas; resigned W. H. Keller, relieved R. E. Jordan.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.*

Tallapoosa -- M. J. Bulger; wounded at Cedar Run; promoted. John H. Hamm.

Tallapoosa -- Joseph Johnston, Jr.; killed at Gettysburg. Lieut. W. D. Bulger commanded.

Tallapoosa -- Joseph T. Russell; resigned. Wm. Ballard; wounded and captured at the Wilderness.

Tallapoosa and Chambers -- A. C. Menefee; killed at Cedar Run. Henry C. Lindsey; wounded at Sharpsburg.

Cherokee -- J. M. Campbell; promoted. F. T. J. Brandon.

Tallapoosa -- Daniel Clowers.

Tallapoosa -- J. V. McKee.

Coosa -- J. Fargerson.

Chambers -- James W. Kellum.

Tallapoosa -- James W. Herren; James H. Sanford; killed at the Wilderness.

*This roster is incomplete, and defective in more than one instance.

Forty-Eighth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment enlisted for three years at Auburn, May 22, 1862, with 1097 men. A few weeks later it reached Virginia, and was attached to Gen. Taliaferro's brigade, of Jackson's division, with the Forty-seventh Alabama, and three Virginia regiments. The Forty-eighth was first engaged in the battle at Cedar Run, with severe loss; and at the second Manassas was again a sufferer. It was part of the investing force at Harper's Ferry, and was badly mutilated at Sharpsburg. During the winter the Forty-eighth was placed in the brigade of Gen. Law of Macon (with the Fourth, Fifteenth, Forty-fourth, and Forty-seventh Alabama regiments), Hood's division, Longstreet's corps. The regiment was under fire at Fredericksburg, and fought with light loss at Suffolk. It moved into Pennsylvania, and its colors floated highest up on the rocky heights of Gettysburg, where it was fearfully punished. Ten weeks later, as part of Longstreet's corps, the regiment was where the lightning of battle flashed brightest, and its thunder pealed loudest at Chicamauga. It was hotly engaged at Lookout Valley, and at Knoxville; and passed the winter in east Tennessee. Rejoining the army of Northern Virginia, the Forty-eighth fought at the Wilderness and Spottsylvania, and its long list of casualties bore testimony to its conduct. From that time to the end, at Hanover Junction, the second Cold Harbor, Bermuda Hundreds, Petersburg, Fussell's Mill, Fort Harrison, Darbytown Road, Williamsburg Road, and Farmville, the regiment was almost constantly on active and perilous duty. Its colors were furled at Appomattox. Over 150 of its men had fallen in battle, 165 died in the service, and 125 had been discharged or transferred.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- James L. Sheffield of Marshall; wounded at Cedar Run; resigned. Wm. A. Oates of Henry; wounded at Fussell's Mill.

Lieut. Colonels -- A. Hughes of Cherokee; resigned. Jesse J. Aldridge of Blount; resigned. W. M. Hardwick of Cherokee; captured on furlough.

Majors -- Enoch Aldridge of Blount; wounded at Cedar Run; resigned. Wm. M. Hardwick; promoted. J. W. Wigginton of Calhoun.

Adjutants -- Thomas B. Harris of Marshall; wounded at Cedar Run; resigned. T. J. Eubanks of Marshall; transferred to line. H. S. Figures of Madison; killed at the Wilderness. F. M. Kitchell.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Blount -- Andrew J. Aldridge; resigned. Jesse J. Aldridge; promoted. R. Graves.

Dekalb -- T. J. Burgess; resigned. D. R. King; mortally wounded at Cedar Run; J. N. DeArman; killed at Petersburg.

Marshall -- W. S. Walker; resigned. J. M. Bedford; resigned. H. C. Kimbrough.

Marshall -- Samuel A. Cox; died in the service. T. J. Eubanks; killed at Lookout Valley. R. T. Ewing.

Marshall -- S. K. Rayburn; resigned. F. M. Ross; resigned. Isham B. Small; killed at White Plains.

Blount -- Reuben Ellis; wounded at Cedar Run; resigned. J. Edwards.

Cherokee -- J. S. Moragne; resigned. A . L. Woodliff ; resigned. N. H. McDuffie.

Cherokee -- R. C. Golightly; killed at Sharpsburg. Wm. M. Hardwick; promoted. T. J. Lumpkin.

Calhoun -- J. W. Wigginton; promoted.

Calhoun -- Moses Lee; killed at the second Manassas. J. B. Hubbard; captured at Fussell's Mill; H. L. Petit.

Forty-Ninth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was orgnized at Nashville, in January 1862, and attached to the Kentucky brigade of Gen. Breckinridge. It took part in the battleof Shiloh, where it lost 113 killed and wounded. A few weeks later, the Forty-ninth was sent to Vicksburg, with Breckinridge's brigade, and was engaged in the defence of the place when bombarded in 1862. Aug. 6, the regiment fought at Baton Rouge with a loss of 45 killed and wounded. Joining the army of Gen. Van Dorn, the Forty-ninth was engaged in the assault on Corinth, and suffered very severely there. Ordered to Port Hudson, the regiment passed the winter in that quarter, and was brigaded with the Twenty-seventh and Thirty-fifth Alabama, and two Mississippi regiments under Gen. Buford, who was soon succeeded by Gen. Beall. The Forty-ninth shared the dangers and hardships of the 42 days siege of Port Hudson, losing 55 men killed and wounded, and the reminder captured. Exchanged three months later, the Forty-ninth re-organized at Cahaba, and was attached to the brigade of Gen. Scott of Louisiana, with the Twelfh Louisiana, and Twenty-seventh, Thirty-fifth, Fifty-fifth, and Fifty-seventh Alabama regments. Joining the main army at Dalton, the brigade was assigned to Loring's division, Stewart's corps. Having wintered at Dalton, the Forty-ninth participated in the Dalton-Atlanta campaign, doing much arduous service, but losing inconsiderably. Around Atlanta it was again fully engaged, and suffered severely. It moved with Gen. Hood into Tennessee, and came out of the battles of Franklin, and Nashville with a long list of casualties, and captured men. Transferred to the Carolinas, the Forty-ninth took part in the operations there. Reduced to a skeleton, it was surrendered at Greensboro, N. C.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- Smith D. Hale of Madison; retired. Jeptha Edwards of DeKalb; captured at Port Hudson.

Lieut. Colonels -- M. Gilbreath of Marshall; resigned. W. N. Crump of Blount; retired. John D. Weeden of Madison; wounded and captured at Nashville.

Majors -- B. Johnston of Marshall; retired. John D. Weeden; promoted. Thomas B. Street of Marshall; captured at Port Hudson.

Adjutants -- John D. Weeden; promoted. C. E. Merrill of Dallas; wounded at Corinth and Franklin.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Marshall -- Wm. H. Wright; resigned. Wm. H. Davidson; captured at Port Hudson, but escaped.

Dekalb -- W. G. Beason, captured at Port Hudson.

Jackson -- Wm. R Coffey; retired . W. S. Bruce; captured at Port Hudson, and died in prison.

Marshall -- James Fletcher; retired. W. H. Smith; captured at Port Hudson, but escaped.

Marshall -- Thomas B. Street; promoted. Lieut. Allen commanded.

Marshall -- J. S. Bain; resigned. F. A. Pogue; killed at Port Hudson (company consolidated).

DeKalb -- Wm. J. Haralson; resigned. T. J. Nicholson; captured at Port Hudson, but escaped.

Madison -- J. D. Wann; retired. G. C. Ledbetter; died in the service. John D. Rivers; killed at Port Hudson. W. M. Maples; wounded at Nashville.

Blount -- W. N. Crump; elected lieutenant colonel. ... Murphy; resigned. R. F. Campbell; captured at Pt. Hudson.

Madison -- John R. Gardner; killed at Shiloh. L. M. Peavy; resigned. Thos. J. Taylor; captured at Port Hudson.

Fiftieth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

[ For the "Fiftieth Alabama," see "Twenty-sixth-Fiftieth." ]

Fifty-First Alabama

Mounted Regiment

This regiment was organized at Oxford, in Calhoun, August 11,1862. Ordered to Tennessee, the regiment was placed under Gen. Forrest, and was in the fight at Lavergne. A few weeks later it was assigned to Gen. Wheeler's command, and served during the war principally in the brigades of Gen. Allen of Montgomery or Gen. Hagan of Mobile. It was engaged in the battle of Murfreesboro with light loss, and was in the raid down the Cumberland River in January with like result. The regiment was engaged in frequent skirmishes while protecting Gen. Bragg's communications. It was in the fight at Shelbyville, where nearly half the regiment were killed or captured. The Fifty-first fought at Tracey City and Chicamauga with few casualties, then was part of the force that made the Sequatchee raid, in which 1000 wagons laden with stores were destroyed, and 4000 mules were butchered. The regiment was part of the force that captured 400 of the enemy at Maryville, and soon after was part of the investing force at Knoxville. During the remainder of the winter of '63-'64, the Fifty-First was arduously employed in east Tennessee. It took its place on Johnston's flank in the retreat to Dalton, and fought nearly every day for three months. At Decatur and Jonesboro the Fifty-first was fully engaged, and lost severely. It moved into Tennessee shortly after, then wheeled about and harassed Sherman's march into the Carolinas with much effect. About a week before the capitulation, the Fifty-first captured the First Alabama Union regiment. As part of Gen. Hagan's brigade, the regiment laid down its arms near Raleigh.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- John T. Morgan of Dallas; promoted. Milton L. Kirkpatrick of Montgomery.

Lieut. Colonels - - James D. Webb of Greene; killed at Elk River. M. L. Kirkpatrick; promoted.

Majors -- Henry Bradford Thompson of Pike; resigned. James Dye of Talladega; captured at Shelbyville.

Adjutants -- Charles Force of District of Columbia; transferred to the line. David S. Bethune of Pike.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Calhoun -- Wm. M. Hames; resigned. H. T. Snow. Lieut. Thomas L. Bowen commanded.

Pike -- Henry B. Thompson; promoted. L. W. Battle; wounded in east Tennessee, and near Fayetteville.

Talladega -- James Dye; promoted. Thomas Curry.

Calhoun -- Robert Draper; resigned. William White; wounded on Sequatchee raid, and at Bentonville.

St. Clair -- William Edwards; resigned. Charles Force; captured at Shelbyville. Lient. J. W. Lapsley commanded.

Talladega -- Nelson D. Johnson; captured at Shelbyville. Lieut. Amos Moss commanded.

Tuskaloosa -- Hampton S. Whitfield; resigned. .... Palmer; resigned. William Walker.

Montgomery -- M. L. Kirkpatrick; promoted. S. W. Cowling (in prison). Lieut. Jos. G. Allen commanded; wounded at Farmington and Fayetteville.

Dallas and Perry -- John Robbins; resigned. Joseph J. Seawell; wounded at Farmington. Lieuts. Reynolds and Harrison commanded.

Mobile -- ..... Ratcliff.

Fifty-Second Alabama

Infantry Regiment

[ If there was such an organization as the Fifty-second Alabama, the author has been unable to gather a trace of it, after a rigid investigation and inquiry. ]

Fifty-Third Alabama

Mounted Regiment

This regiment was organized at Montgomery, in November 1862. A few weeks later it proceeded to Mississippi. Moving from Columbus to Decatur, in Lawrence, a portion of the regiment was there equipped, and proceeded to join Gen. Van Dorn. This battalion was in the fight at Thompson's Station, and at Brentwood, suffering severely in the former. The regiment was engaged in the fight with Dodge at Town Creek, and in the pursuit of Streight. Soon after, the Fifty-third joined the main army at Dalton as part of Hannon's brigade, Kelly's division. It operated on the right of the army as it fell back towards Atlanta, and was engaged in constant and perilous duty. When Sherman reached Atlanta, the Fifty-third was the principal force engaged in the daring raid in his rear, whereby a valuable train was destroyed. It was then at the heels of Sherman as he devastated Georgia and the Carolinas, and took part in the last operations of the war in that quarter. The regiment laid down its arms at Columbia, South Carolina.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- Moses W. Hannon of Montgomery; promoted.

Lieut. Colonels -- J. F. Gaines of Montgomery; wounded at Waynesboro.

Majors -- Thos. F. Jenkins of Wilcox; captured near Florence.

Adjutants -- R. B. Snodgrass of Montgomery; wounded thrice; transferred. John Tannehill of Montgomery.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Macon -- John H. Hannon.

Pike and Macon -- W. L. Hamner; resigned. I.A. Wilson.

Coosa and Tallapoosa -- J. C. Humphries.

Dale -- William T. McCall.

Dallas -- W. R. Davis; captured near Rome.

Monroe and Wilcox -- L. E. Locke; captured near Florence. (From the other Companies). -- P. B. Mastin.

Coffee and Dale -- J. E. P. Flournoy.

Lowndes -- E. L. Sanderson; resigned. D. C. Whitley; resigned. W. J. Moncrief.

Montgomery and Autauga -- Adam C. Felder.

Fifty-Fourth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was made up of six Alabama companies of the First Alabama-Miss-Tenn. Regiment of Col. Baker of Barbour, and four Alabama companies of the regiment of Col. L. M. Walker of Tennessee. These companies had been captured at Island Ten, after nearly a year's arduous service above Memphis. Organized at Jackson, Miss, October 1862, the Fifty-fourth operated in the vicinity of Vicksburg during the winter. It fought at Fort Pemberton with light loss, and at Baker's Creek with equal result. Having escaped Vicksburg by moving with Gen. Loring from Baker's Creek, the Fifty-fourth was soon after at the siege of Jackson. It was then transferred to the army of Gen. Bragg. The regiment wintered at Dalton, and was engaged in the campaign from there to Atalnta, when the Army of Tennessee disputed the ground inch by inch, and stained those inches with blood. The regiment lost severely at Resaca, and at Atlanta July 22. The loss was very heavy at Atlanta July 28, more than half the regiment being killled and wounded, and the flag perforated by forty bullets. Having moved with Hood into middle Tennessee, the Fifty-fourth shared the privations and disasters of that campaign. Transferred to North Carolina, its colors waved defiantly at Bentonville, its last battlefield. A remnant only were surrendered with the forces of Gen. Johnston.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- Alpheus Baker of Barbour; captured at Island Ten; wounded at Baker's Creek; promoted. John A. Minter.

Lieut. Colonels -- John A Minter of Coffee; captured at Island Ten; promoted. Thaddeus H. Shackelford.

Majors -- Thaddeus H. Shackelford of Mississippi; captured at Island Ten; promoted.

Adjutants -- Horace M. Smith of Barbour; died in service.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Coffee -- I. T. Law; captured at Island Ten, and Atlanta.

Limestone -- Charles W. Raisler; captured at Island Ten, and Baker's Creek.

Chocta -- Jonas Griffin; captured at Island Ten; resigned. Charles C. McCall.

State of Mississippi -- A. J. Evans; captured at Island Ten; wounded near Atlanta.

Coffee -- Lewis J. Laird; captured at Island Ten; wounded at New Hope.

Chocta -- Joshua Morse; till re-organized. Wm. S. Smith.

Macon -- John H. Christian; captured at Island Ten.

Blount, Morgan, Limestone -- ....Whitfield; resigned. Porter Bibb; till re-orgnized. S. C. Twitty. Lieut. G. L. Brindley commanded.

State of Mississippi --..... Wright. Lieut. Carpenter Commanded.

DeKalb -- Thomas H. Withers; captured at Island Ten and Canton. Lieut. Appleton commanded.

Fifty-Fifth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was made up of Snodgrass's and Norwood's battalions, the former of six companies, the latter of five. Snodgrass's battalion was organized at Corinth, in the spring of 1862, out of companies that had been in the service a year at that time, in the orgnizations of other states; and they had suffered severely at Shiloh; while the battalion itself had fought at the first siege of Vicksburg, and in the battles of Baton Rouge and Corinth. Norwood's battalion was organized at Clinton, Miss., out of the five companies of Alabmians which had fought and been captured at Fort Donelson while part of Quarles' "Tennessee" regiment. Organized at Port Hudson, February 1863, with 900 veterans, the Fifty-fifth fought at Baker's Creek in Buford's brigade, Loring's division, losing considerably. It shared in the fighting at Jackson, and the subsequent operations in Mississippi. As part of Scott's brigade, the regiment was attached to the Army of Tennessee in the spring of 1864. It was much reduced by the constant fighting on the retreat from Dalton, but entered the battle of Peach-tree Creek (July 20,1864) with 22 officers and 256 men, and lost in killed and wounded 14 officers, and 155 men. After some further skirmishing, the Fifty-fifth participated in the winter campaign in Tennessee, and its lists of casualties both at Franklin and Nashville were large. Proceeding to North Carolina, the regiment, sadly reduced in strength, surrendered at Greensboro, under Col. Snodgrass.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- John Snodgrass of Jackson.

Lieut. Colonels -- John H. Norwood of Jackson; wounded at Peach-tree.

Majors -- J. H. Jones of Jackson; killed at Peach-tree. J. B. Dickey of Madison.

Adjutants -- Hal. C. Bradford; detached. J. C. Howell of Cherokee, killed at Peach-tree.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Madison -- J. B. Dickey; promoted. J. M. Campbell.

Cherokee -- D. C. Daniel; wounded at Resaca and Atlanta.

Calhoun -- Peter Nunnally; wounded at Peach-tree.

Jackson -- Thomas Bridges; resigned. J. M. Thompson; wounded at Peach-tree.

Jackson and Marshall -- John W. Evans; killed at Peach-tree.

Jackson -- Wm. D. McCampbell.

Marshall -- Arthur B. Carter; killed at Peach-tree. A. S. Mitchell.

Jackson -- J. H. Cowan; wounded at Peach-tree.

Jackson -- Alex'r Sisk; absent without leave. A. S. Wheeler.

Cherokee (consolidated)--

Wm. Randall; cap. Vicksb'g.
Robert Wright; resigned.

Fifty-Sixth Alabama

Mounted Regiment

The Fifty-sixth was made up of two battalions, commanded by Majors Boyles and Hewlett, and which had been in the service several months. Thus organized in the summer of 1863, the Fifty-sixth operated in north Mississippi for some time under Gen. Ruggles. It was there brigaded under Gen. Ferguson, and sent to north Georgia. It served on the flank of the army during the Dalton-Atlanta campaign, and saw arduous duty. The regiment moved with Gen. Hood to the Tennessee, then turned and harassed Sherman. It was in the trenches of Savannah, and operated near Augusta. It moved into the Carolinas, and was surrendered at Greensboro, about 200 strong.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- William Boyles of Mobile.

Lieut. Colonels -- Wm. A. Hewlett of Walker; transferred. P. H. Debardelaben of Autauga; transferred. Wm. F. Martin of Mobile.

Majors -- P. H. Debardelaben; promoted. Wm. F. Martin, promoted. Thomas D. Hall of Autagua.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Autauga and Montgomery -- Thomas D. Hall; wounded near Kingston, Ga; promoted. George Rives.

Mobile -- W. F. Martin; promoted; James W. Bryant.

Butler -- F. D. N. Riley.

Mobile -- William McGill; killed near Decatur, in Morgan. H. O. Eaton.

State of Mississippi -- Geo. F. Peake, (company detached.).

Walker --..... Johnson; killed accidentally. ... Broach.

There were also five companies from Walker and adjacent counties, under Captains Bibb, Sheppard, James Moore, and Rice; the latter succeeded by Capt. Morrow, as he was absent without leave.

Fifty-Seventh Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Troy, in Pike, March 1863, as part of the brigade of Gen. Clanton of Montgomery. It was stationed at Mobile and Pollard till January 1864, when it moved to Demopolis. Brigaded there under Gen. Buford, (soon succeeded by Gen. Scott) with the Twelfth Louisiana, Twenty-seventh, Thirty-fifth, and Fifty-fifth Alabama and a Louisiana regiment, the Fifty-seventh joined the Army of the Tennessee in time to share fully the hardships of the Dalton-Atlanta campaign. The casualties of the regiment, however, were not severe till the battle of Peach-tree Creek, when it was cut to pieces. The Fifty-seventh participated in the movement into Tennessee, and at Franklin and Nashville its losses were again very large. Transferred to North Carolina, the regiment fought at Bentonville with severe loss. Its colors were there folded when the army was disbanded.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- J. P. W. Amerine of Pike; superceded. C. J. L. Cunningham of Pike; wounded at Franklin.

Lieut. Colonels -- J. W. Mabry of Barbour; superceded. R. A. Bethune of Pike; wounded at Peach-tree.

Majors -- C. J. L. Cunningham; promoted. W. R. Arnold of Pike; killed at Peach-tree. J. Horatio Wiley of Pike.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Pike -- J. P. Wood.

Barbour -- Daniel Martin.

Dale -- R. A. Bethune; promoted. Jesse Bruner.

Pike and Coffee --W. R. Arnold; promoted. M. J. Horn.

Henry -- J. H. Wiley; promoted. E. Culver; wounded.

Pike -- James N. Arrington; resigned. Reuben Lane.

Coffee -- Jesse O'Neal; resigned. Wm. O. Mixon.

Pike and Barbour -- Bailey M. Talbot; killed at Peach-tree. Alexander Faison; wounded.

Dale and Coffee -- Mordecai White; resigned. W. G. Yelverton.

Fifty-Eighth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

The Ninth Alabama (eight companies) battalion was organized at Newbern, in Greene, November 1861, and proceeded to Corinth the spring following. It was engaged at Shiloh, Farmington, and a number of skirmishes near Corinth, all with light loss; but at Blackland the battalion lost about 20 men killed and wounded, besides a large number by disease at Corinth and Tupelo. In the summer of 1862 the battalion was sent to Mobile and remained there till April 1863. At that time it proceeded to Tullahoma, and was placed in Clayton's brigade. The battalion was in several small engagements, especially at Hoover's Gap. In July 1863 at Tallahoma, two additional companies were attached, and the Fifty-eighth regiment was thus formed. Placed in Bate's brigade, a few weeks later the regiment was in the great battle of Chicamauga. On the first day it captured four pieces of artillery, and on the second was in a desperate charge which broke the enemy's line; but its loss in killed and wounded was 148 out of 254 men. A few weeks later, the regiment was consolidated with the Thirty-second Alabama, the field officers of the Fifty-eighth being retained, and placed in Clayton's brigade. The consolidated regiment had 400 present at Missionary Ridge, and lost 250 in casualties and prisoners. The regiment wintered at Dalton. At Resaca, within a few minutes, it lost 95 killed and wounded out of 300 engaged. It was engaged in numerous skirmishes during the retreat, and fought at the battles of New Hope and Kennesa, losing a number in each. The Thirty-second-Fifty-eighth was also in the bloody battles around Atlanta and a long list of casualties told the story of its conduct. Moving with Hood into Tenessee, the regiment was warmly engaged at Columbia, Franklin, and Nashville, and again at Franklin on the retreat. Ordered to Spanish Fort, the regiment was in garrison there during the siege, losing considerably in casualties. It surrendered at Meridian, under Col. Jones.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- Bush Jones of Perry.

Lieut. Colonels -- John W. Inzer of St. Clair; wounded at Chicamauga; captured at Mission Ridge.

Majors -- Harry I. Thornton of Greene; wounded at Resaca and Atlanta.

Adjutants -- Robert T. Harris of Marengo; wounded at Chicamauga; retired. John Clow of Scotland; killed at Chicamauga. Albert T. Goodwyn of Autauga; captured at Mission Ridge. Walter Hungerford of Perry (acting); killed at Atlanta. Wiley Spruill of St. Clair.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

St. Clair -- Sheriff Brewster; resigned. George S. Markham; captured at Mission Ridge.

Fayette -- Edward Crenshaw; wounded at Chicamauga.

Jefferson -- W. E. Lee; captured at Mission Ridge.

St. Clair -- W. M. Inzer; captured at Atlanta; resigned. R. W. Wiggins.

Butler -- Gid. Holland; killed at Spanish Fort.

Calhoun -- Samuel D. McClellan; resigned. Clement P. Read; wounded at Fish River.

St. Clair -- Sidney F. Lister; killed at Mission Ridge. A. B. Vandergrift.

Dallas -- Elias Fort; resigned. Calvin L. Harrell; wounded at Chicamauga.

St. Clair, Calhoun, Talladega -- John A. Averett; killed at Atlanta. Joseph T. Curry.

Autauga and Montgomery -- Samuel D. Oliver.

Fifty-Ninth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was formed by the consolidation of the Second and Fourth battalions of Hilliard's Legion. The Legion was organized at Montgomery June 25, 1862, and consisted of five battalions one of which was mounted, and being detached in a short time thereafter, became part of the Tenth Confederate regiment. The Second battalion, six companies was commanded by Lieut. Colonel Bolling Hall, Jr. of Autauga, and Major W. Stubblefield of Coosa; the Fourth battalion was commanded by Major John D. McLennan of Barbour. The legion proceeded to east Tennessee, nearly 3000 strong, under its commander, Col. Hilliard of Mongomery. Proceeding to Cumberland Gap, it was part of the force that besieged that position. In October the legion was a part of the force that occupied Kentucky, a fatiguing march. It passed the winter and summer following in east Tennessee during which time Col. Jack Thorington of Montgomery (of the first battalion) succeeded Col. Hilliard, and in April 1863 it was attached to Gen. Gracie's brigade. The legion was in the great battle of Chicamauga, and left more than half its number on the bloody field, and the flag of the Second battalion was perforated by 81 balls. Moving into east Tennessee, Col. Thorington having resigned, the legion was divided into the Fifty-ninth and Sixtieth Alabama regiments, and Twenty-third battalion, at Charleston, Nov. 25, 1863. The Fifty-ninth was at the investment of Knoxville, and the fights at Dandridge and Beene's Station, with some casualties, especially at the latter. In April 1864 the regiment reached Richmond, and shortly after took part in the battle of Drewry's Bluff and the fight with Sheridan, losing largely in casualties in the former. From June till the March following, the Fifty-ninth was in the trenches of Petersburg, or in the numerous fierce conflicts at the dank and rear of the army, losing a number at Hatcher's Run and White-oaks Road. As part of Gordon's corps, Bushrod Johnston's division, the regiment was engaged at Appomattox, and there surrendered.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- Bolling Hall, Jr. of Autauga; wounded at Drewry's (and at Chicamauga as battalion commander).

Lieut. Colonels -- John D. McLennan of Barbour; killed at Drewry's. Geo. W. Huguley of Chambers.

Majors -- Geo. W. Huguley; promoted. Lewis H. Crumpler of Coosa.

Adjutants -- Crenshaw Hall of Autauga; wounded at Drewry's.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Randolph -- John C. Hendrix; died in the service. S. E. A. Reaves; wounded at Drewry's.

Autauga -- John F. Wise; resigned John E. Hall; wounded at Petersburg.

Tallapoosa -- W. Dillard; died in service. John Porter.

Pike -- E. L. McIntyre; resigned. John A. Henley.

Dale -- W. H. Stuckey. W. J. Peacock.

Coosa -- L. H. CrumpIer; promoted. W.R. Davie.

Barbour --James Lang; wounded twice.

Butler -- R. Glasgow; resigned. Louis Harrell; resigned. H. H. Rutledge; killed at Drewry's. Zach. Daniel; killed at Hatcher's Run.

Butler* -- R. F. Manly; wounded at Drewry's; wounded and captured at Hatcher's Run.

Coosa -- W. D. Walden; killed at Chicamauga. R. H. Gulledge.

* This company was part of the preceding one for some time.

Sixtieth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was formed by consolidating four companies of the First battalion of Hilliard's Legion with six companies of the Third battalion. The first battalion, seven companies, went out with Jack Thorington of Montgomery as lieutenant colonel, and John H. Holt of Montgomery as major;* and the Third battalion, six companies, went out with John W. A. Sanford of Montgomery as lieutenant colonel, and Hatch Cook of Georgia as major. The operations of the Hilliard Legion are given in the memoranda of the Fifty-ninth Alabama. At Chicamauga, the First battalion lost 168 killed and wounded of 230 engaged, and the third battalion lost 50 killed and wounded of 219 engaged. Organized at Charleston, Tennessee, Nov. 25, 1863, the Sixtieth passed through the trials and perils of the winter campaign in east Tennessee. In the spring it reached Richmond, and lost heavily at Drewry's, where the regiment was complimented on the field by Gen. Gracie, as the Third battalion had been at Chicamauga by Gen. Preston of Kentucky. The regiment was in the trenches at Petersburg for eight months, and lost continually by the almost incessant shelling. At White-oaks Road and Hatcher's Run the Sixtieth was fully engaged, and its loss was severe. At Appomattox, "when the news of the surrender was receved, its men were huzzaing over a captured battery and a routed foe."** The regiment there numbered 165, rank and file.

* Thorington succeeded Hilliard as colonel of the legion and Holt was thereupon promoted, but killed at Chicamauga. Daniel S. Troy of Montgomery became major and lieutenant colonel, after Col. Holt.
** Sergeant-major Lewellyn A. Shaver of Montgomery, who has published (1867) a very interesting volume about the Sixtieth.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- John W. A. Sanford of Montgomery.

Lieut. Colonels -- Daniel S. Troy of Montgomery; wounded at Drewry's; wounded and captured at Hatcher's Run.

Majors -- Hatch Cook of Georgia; killed at White Oaks Road.

Adjutants -- James N. Gilmer of Montgomery.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Coosa -- Thomas H. Smith.

Montgomery -- David A. Clark; died of wounds received at Appomattox.

Montgomery -- Peter M. McEachen.

Pike -- John McReless.

Pike -- George Boatwright; resigned. S. A. Williams; wounded at White Oaks Road.

Chambers -- John W. Smith; wounded at White Oaks Road.

Lowndes -- W. H. Zeagler.

Butler -- .... Tarbutton; wounded; retired. G. A. Tarbutton; wounded at White Oaks Road.

State of Georgia -- Robert B. Lockhart.

Henry -- James W. Stokes.

Sixty-First Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Pollard in September 1863. A number of the men had been in camps of instruction for some time under the conscript law of congress, while the officers were mostly veterans. The regiment was first brigaded under Gen. Clanton, but in Junuary 1864 was ordered to Virginia. Reaching Orange C. H., the regiment took the place of the Twenty-sixth Alabama in Battle's brigade, Rodes' division. The Sixty-first was first under fire at the Wilderness where its loss was severe, but it captured a battery, killed Gen. Jenkins, and almost annihilated his New York Zouave brigade. At Spottsylvania the Sixty-first lost heavily in casualties and prisoners during the several days' fighting. Its loss was not severe at the second Cold Harbor, and it soon after moved into the Valley with Early, and crossed into Maryland. At Snicker's Gap and Winchester the loss of the Sixty-first was severe, and even larger at Fisher's Hill. Rejoining the main army, the regiment took its place in the trenches at Petersburg, and lost continually, especially in prisoners at Hare's Hill. On the retreat to Appomattox the Sixty-first fought much of the time and surrendered there 27 men under Capt. A. B. Fannin.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- Wm. G. Swanson of Macon.

Lieut. Colonels -- Louis H. Hill of Coosa; captured at Petersburg.

Majors -- W. E. Pinckard of Macon; captured at Petersburg.

Adjutants -- Charles T. Pollard, Jr. of Montgomery; resigned. Thomas T. Greene of Montgomery.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

"A"-- Jas. W. Fannin of Macon; captured at Spottsylvania.

"B"-- Robert A. Peterson of Macon; retird. Wm. H. Philpot of Macon; captured at Petersburg.

"C"-- Julius P. Haggerty of Coosa; retired. C. C. Long of Macon.

Butler -- John F. Barganier; detached. .... Porter; captured at Spottsylvania; died in prison.

"E"-- Eugenius F. Baber of Macon; retired. Aug. B. Fannin, Jr. of Macon; wounded at Cold Harbor and Winchester.

Chmbers -- A. F. Zachary; wounded at Spottsylvania; retired. .. Allen.

Coffee -- A. D. McCaskill; killed at Wilderness. J. J. Joiner; killed at Hare's Hill.

Macon -- Sidney B. Paine; retired. Wm. A. Campbell; wounded.

"I" -- James S. Hastings of Montgomery; retired. A. J. Slaughter of Macon; wounded; at Snicker's Gap.

Henry (1864) -- J. K. Grantham.

Sixty-Second Alabama

Infantry Regiment

Lockhart's Battalion, the nucleus of this regiment, was organized at Selma, in January 1864, and was on duty in the State till July, when it moved up to Cheha, and lost severely in the fight there with Rousseau. A few days after, it was organized as the Sixty-second Alabama regiment, at Mobile. Stationed at Fort Gaines, the regiment was in the bombardment of that place, losing several killed and wounded, and the remainder captured. The prisoners were taken to New Orleans and Ship Island, and subjected to brutal treatment at the hands of the enemy. Exchanged in Mobile Bay, Jan. 4, 1865. Placed in garrison at Spanish Fort, as part of Thomas' brigade (with the Sixty-third Alabama), the regiment withstood the siege there for six days, with some loss, and was then relieved by Holtzclaw's brigade. It served through the siege and bombardment of Blakeley, losing a number killed and wounded, and was captured in the assault on the works. Taken to Ship Island, the men were exchanged in time to be surrendered with the department. The regiment was composed wholly of young men, and was complimented in special orders by Gen. Lidell for its conduct at Spanish Fort.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- Daniel Huger of Mobile.

Lieut. Colonels -- James L. Davidson of Bibb; till re-organized. Brount Yniestre; captured at Blakeley.

Majors -- B. Yniestre of Mobile; promoted. J. W. Pitts of Shelby; captured at Blakeley.

Adjutants -- T. G. Bush of Pickens; captured at Blakeley.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Greene -- Wm. H. King.

Perry and Dallas -- George D. Shortridge, Jr; captured at Blakeley.

St. Clair and Randolph -- Joseph Thornton; captured at Blakeley.

Talladega -- William Donahoe.

Dallas and Perry -- Jos. J. Alston; captured at Blakeley.

Calhoun and Talladega -- Junius L. Walthall.

Shelby and Talladega -- J. W. Pitts; promoted. Wailes Wallace; captured at Blakeley.

Perry -- James A. McCaw; wounded at Cheha.

Calhoun, St. Clair, Randolph -- Henry Foy.

Bibb -- Wm. C. Ward; wounded at Spanish Fort; captured at Blakeley.

Sixty-Third Alabama

Infantry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Blakeley, in July 1864, and nearly all of the men except two companies ("A'' and "B") were conscripts from various parts of the State, the officers being mostly veterans. The regiment remained in the defenses of Mobile till ordered to Spanish Fort, three days before the place was invested, March 1865. It was, with the Sixty-second, a part of Gen. Thomas' brigade, and lost several killed and wounded during the first six days' operations at Spanish Fort. Relieved, and sent to Blakeley, the Sixty-third arrived there in time to share in all the privations and perils of that siege. After some loss, it was captured with the fortress, April 9, 1865, about 300 in number, and exchanged just prior to the surrender of the department.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- Oland S. Rice; till re-organized. Junius A. Law of Macon; captured at Blakeley.

Lieut. Colonels -- Junius A. Law; promoted. John H. Echols of Macon; captured at Blakeley.

Majors -- John H. Echols; promoted. I. W. Suttle of Coosa; captured at Spanish Fort.

Adjutants -- David Johnston of Macon, (acting); captured at Blakeley.

The following were captains in the regiment:

James Armstrong, W. C. Zimmerman, Charles W. Martin, Alto V. Lee, Spottswood Garland, all captured at Blakeley; and I. W. Suttle, promoted, succeeded by ... Johnson, killed at Spanish Fort.

Sixty-Fourth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

[There may have been such a regiment as the Sixty-fourth Alabama among the organizations at Mobile but it could have served but a few months, and in no engagement.]

Sixty-Fifth Alabama

Infantry Regiment

The nucleus of this regiment was the Fourth Alabama battalion of reserves, seven companies, which organized in July 1864 at Mobile, with Wm. M. Stone of Sumter as lieutenant colonel, and E. M. Underhill of Mobile as major. The battalion was in garrison at MobiIe, and in November was orgnaized as the Sixty-fifth regiment. In December the regiment was sent to east Mississippi to repel a raid, and remained there several weeks. Ordered from Mobile to North Carolina, the regiment was stopped at Montgomery, and ordered to report to Gen. Buford. It retired before Wilson's column to Gerard, and participated in the battle there, losing several killed and wounded, and the remainder mostly captured.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- E. M. Underhill of Mobile.

Lieut. Colonels -- E. Toomer of Mobile.

Majors -- S. B. Waring of Mobile.

Adjutants -- C. F. Westfeldt of Mobile; resigned. C. H. Minge of Mobile.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Mobile -- A. J. Leslie; captured at Girard.

Mobile -- .... Bass; captured at Mobile.

Mobile -- .... Magoffin.

Monroe --....Snowdon.

............--.... Atkinson; captured at Girard.

Conecuh --... Walker; captured at Girard.

Mobile -- E. Toomer; promoted. .... Lewis; captured at Girard.

Macon --.... Smith.

Coosa --.... Demson.

Dale -- .... Thornton; captured at Girard.

First Alabama

Cavalry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Montgomery, in November 1861. Ordered to Tennessee soon after, the regiment was engaged at the battle of Shiloh with light loss. It fought at Boonville, suffering severely, and at Blackland with few casualties. The regiment moved into Kentucky with the army, as part of Wheeler's command; was engaged at Perryville, and skirmished for several weeks subsequently. When the army reached middle Tennessee, the first was occupied in a series of skirmishes, and lost considerably at Murfreesboro. It guarded the flanks and front of the army, and protected the rear on the retreat to Tullahoma and Chattanoogga, losing severely at Duck River. The regiment fought at Chicamauga with light loss, and moved into east Tennessee with Longstreet, fighting at Clinton, Knoxville, Mossy Creek, &c., with some loss in each. It was part of the force on the Sequatchee raid, fought at Dandridge, and operated on and harassed the enemy's front and flank during the Dalton-Atlanta campaign. The First was in the brilliant fight at Decatur, with severe loss, and took part in the capture of Gen. Stoneman's column. Moving to the Tennessee, the regiment faced about and pursued Sherman. It was in the fight at Waynesboro, and lost a number at Fiddler's Pond. In the attack on Kilpatrick, and the collisions at Averysboro and Bentonville, the First participated. Near Raleigh, a few days before the surrender, the regiment drove the enemy. It surrendered as part of Hogan's brigade, Allen's division at Salisbury, N. C., about 150 strong.

Field and Staff

Colonels - James H. Clanton of Montgomery; promoted. Wm. W. Allen of Montgomery; wounded at Murfreesboro; promoted. David T. Blakey of Montgomery; wounded at Dandridge.

Lieut. Colonels - M. W. Hannon of Montgomery; resigned. W. W. Allen; promoted. Thomas Brown of Montgomery; killed at Woodsonville, Ky. D. T. Blakey; promoted. Augustus H. Johnson of Montgomery.

Majors - W. W. Allen; promoted. Thomas Brown; promoted. D. T. Blakey; promoted. A. H. Johnson; promoted. Vincent M. Elmore of Montgomery.

Adjutants - James H. Judkins, Jr. of Montgomery; resigned. E. D. Ledyard of Montgomery; transferred. Wesley Jones of Montgomery; killed at Fiddler's Pond. B. L. Wyman of Montgomery.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Autauga -- Thos. Brown; promoted. W. T. Lary; wounded at Middleton, Tenn; resigned. John A. Whiting; captured near Nashville.

Montgomery -- J. F. Gaines; resigned. W. G. Campbell; resigned.

Morgan -- J. W. Harper; resigned. Josiah Patterson; (company detached).

Tallapoosa -- John G. Stokes; resigned. Jesse Fitzpatrick; resigned. Henry Washburn.

Calhoun -- D. T. Blakey; promoted. Warren S. Reese; transferred. J. Monroe Anderson.

Pike, Dale, Coffee -- A. H. Johnson; promoted. George P. Fuhrman; captured at Middleton.

Autauga and Montgomery -- Joseph Hodgson; resigned. George Speed; killed at Noonday Creek.

Monroe and Butler -- Orlando H. Abney; resigned. Jas. Hightower; resigned. V. M. Elmore; promoted. Bolling Kavanaugh.

Pike and Butler -- C. H. Colvin; resigned. Sydney E. Allen; killed at Murfreesboro. Robert Allen; wounded.

Montgomery -- Britton C. Tarver; resigned.

Second Alabama

Cavalry Regiment

This regiment was orgnaized at Montgomery, May 1, 1862. Proceeding to west Florida, it operated there about ten months, and was engaged in several skirmishes. Ordered to north Mississippi, and placed under Gen. Ruggles, the regiment lost 8 men in a skirmish at Mud creek. It was then placed in Ferguson's brigade, and operated in the Tennessee valley, taking part in numerous skirmishes. The Second fought Grierson at Okalona, with a loss of about 70 men killed and wounded, then harassed Sherman on his march to and from Mississippi. Joining Gen.Wheeler, the Second performed arduous duty on the flank of the army in the Dalton-Atlanta campaign, and lost a number of men in the battle of July 22 at Atlanta. Having accompanied Hood to Rome, the Second then fell on Sherman's rear, and skirmished almost daily with some loss. The regiment tracked Sherman to Greenesboro, N. C., then escorted President Davis to Georgia. At Forsyth, in that State, the regiment laid down its arms, 450 strong.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- F. W Hunter of Montgomery; relieved. R. Gordon Earle of Calhoun; killed at Kingston, Ga. John N. Carpenter of Greene.

Lieut. Colonels -- James Cunningham of Monroe; resigned. John P. West of Shelby; resigned. J. N. Carpenter; promoted. Jos. J. Pegues of Tuskaloosa; wounded at Nickajack.

Majors -- Mathew R. Marks of Montgomery; relieved. J. N. Carpenter; promoted. J. J. Pegues; promoted. Richard W. Carter of Butler.

Adjutants -- James M. Bullock of Greene.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Calhoun -- Richard G. Earl; promoted to colonel. Jacob W. Whisenhant; wounded at Kennesa.

Shelby -- John P. West; promoted to lieutenant colonel. Frank King.

Greene -- John N. Carpenter; promoted. James A. Anderson; wounded at Nickajack.

Tuskaloosa -- J. J. Pegues; promoted. James Eddins.

Butler -- R. W. Carter; promoted. Joseph Allen.

Montgomery -- Wm. L. Allen; died in the service. Bethel J. Bonham.

Coosa -- Wm. P. Ashley; wounded at Decatur, Ga.

Monroe -- Jas. H. McCreary; resigned. F. E. Richardson.

Montgomery and Dallas -- Felix Glackmeyer; resigned. A. N. McIver; resigned. Walter H. Daniel.

Montgomery -- Thomas R. Stacey; resigned. A. P. Wilson.

Third Alabama

Cavalry Regiment

This regiment was orgnaized at Tupelo, in June 1862, by companies that had been in the service some months, and several of which, as "Murphy's battalion,'' had fought at Shiloh. The regiment accompanied the army into Kentucky and was engaged in daily conflicts with the enemy, particularly at Bramlet's Station and Perryville. It fell back with the army, and was on constant and arduous duty during the remainder of the war, protecting its communications, guarding its rear and flanks, and often raiding upon the enemy's trains and outposts. It was part of the brigade composed of the First, Third, Fourth, Ninth, Twelfth, and Fifty-first Alabama cavalry, command first by Gen. Allen of Montgomery, subsequently by Gen. Hagan of Mobile. The Third was engaged at Murfreesboro, Shelbyville, Chicamauga, Kingston, Knoxville, Mossy Creek, Strawberry Plains, Losing continuously in casualties, and suffering severely during Longstreet's winter campaign. In the Dalton-Atlanta campaign it performed arduous service, fighting with severe loss at Decatur, and helping to capture Stoneman's column. In front of Sherman, the regiment shrouded Hood's movements, then harassed the former on his march, participating in the fights near Macon, at Winchester, Aiken, Fayetteville, Bentonville, Raleigh, and Chapel Hill. Reduced by its losses to a skeleton, the regiment surrendered in North Carolina.

Field and Staff

Colonels - James Hagan of Mobile; wounded at Franklin and Kingston, Tann.; promoted. Josiah Robins of Wilcox; wounded near Fayetteville.

Lieut. Colonels - S. Jennings Murphy of Mobile; transferred. T. H. Mauldin of Monroe; resigned. Josiah Robins; promoted. John D. Farish of Wilcox; wounded near Fayetteville.

Majors - F. Y. Gaines of Chocta; retired. Jo. Robins; promoted. J. D. Farish; wounded in Coosa Valley. D. P. Forney of Calhoun.

Adjutants - R. R. Gaines of Chocta; wounded at Farmington; transferred. John L. Reddish of Wilcox; wounded in Coosa Valley; transferred. A. H. Smith.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Chocta.- W. W. Lang; retired. W. P. cheney.

Monroe.- T. H. Mauldin; promoted. T. J. Billingslea.

Wilcox.- Josiah Robins; promoted. J. Wesley Voltz.

Wilcox and Dallas.- Thos. F. Jenkins; resigned. J. D. Farish; promoted. S. W. Pegues.

Mobile.- Paul Ravesies; transferred. J. W. Smith; resigned. J. C. Brown.

Perry and Dallas.- Wm. Cathy; killed at Perryville. R. W. Cole; resigned. Thomas Norris; killed at Chapel Hill.

Calhoun.- D. P. Forney; promoted. .... Stewart.

Autauga.- J. D. Hill; resigned. Wm. Mims.

Dallas and Wilcox.- James Boykin; transferred. Augustus Tomlinson; died in the service. Thomas Lenoir; killed at Resaca. Henry R. Gordon.

Dallas and Wilcox.- R. W. Smith; transferred. ...... Holloway.

Roddy's Fourth Alabama

Cavalry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Tuscumbia, October 1862, and was sent to middle Tennessee. It wintered near the army, but in the early spring was sent to the Tennessee Valley. When Dodge advanced up the valley, the Fourth met him below Tuscumbia, and contested the ground to Town Creek, losing severely. It took part in the pursuit of Streight, and, as the heart and nucleus of Roddy's brigade, was on constant and perilous duty. The regiment fought with loss at Tishomingo, and suffered severely in the battle of Harrisburg. On Forrest's Athens and Pulaski raid, the Fourth bore the brunt of two or three fights, and was badly cut up. It bore the leading part in Gen. Roddy's movements, repelling raids, picketing the front, and making a number of daring attacks, such as that at Barton's and the one at Florence. When Wilson crossed the mountains, the regiment was in his front, and fought nearly all the way from Montevallo to Selma. The larger portion of the Fourth was captured at Selma, and the remnant laid down its arms at Pond Spring.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- P. D. Roddy of Lawrence; promoted. Wm. A. Johnson of Lauderdale; wounded at Pulaski.

Lieut. Colonels -- Wm. A. Johnson; promoted. F. M. Wines of Morgan.

Majors -- Dick Johnson of Lauderdale, wounded near Florence; killed near Moulton.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Franklin -- Jas. Williams; killed at Courtland. C. J. Hyatt.

Lauderdale -- Joseph H. Sloss; transferred. Thos. Williams; wounded near Bainbridge; killed near Huntsville. J. M. Weems.

Lauderdale -- Wm. H. Welsh.

Franklin -- W. R. Julian; till re-organized. John A. Steele.

Lawrence -- J. H. Shackelford; transferred. Ward McDonald.

Franklin -- John Newsom; transferred. John C. Nelson; wounded and captured.

Franklin -- Jere. Daily; till re-organized. Edw. J. Odum.

Walker -- E. Kelly; wounded.

Lawrence -- Philip Thirlkill; transferred. .... Maguire.

Russell's Fourth Alabama

Cavalry Regiment

At Murfreesboro, Tenn., Dec. 1862, four companies of the original battalion with which Gen. Forrest entered the service, were united with the six companies of the Fourth Alabama battalion, and the regiment organized. The four companies that had been with Forrest for 15 months, had fought at Fort Donelson, Shiloh, and numerous other engagements. A few days after its organization, the regiment went with Forrest on a raid into west Tennessee, and fought at Lexington, Trenton, Jackson, and Parker's Cross Roads, capturing two pieces of artillery at the first, and losing severely at the last mentioned battle. A few weeks later, the Fourth was in the attack on Fort Donelson, by Wheeler and Forrest, and there suffered severely. Attached to Allen's brigade of Wheeler's division, the regiment took part in the operations of the cavalry of the Army of Tennessee. At Chicamauga the regiment was warmly engaged, and bore a full share in all the engagements of the east Tennessee campaign of Gen. Longstreet. It was then in the Dalton-Atlanta campaign, fighting continuously, and was part of the force that captured Stoneman's column. When Gen. Hood began to move into Tennessee, the Fourth was detached, and sent to the Tennessee valley, and operated in that region. After the battle of Nashville, the Fourth was assigned to Forrest's corps, and was surrendered with his troops at Gainesville.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- A. A. Russell of Jackson; wounded twice.

Lieut. Colonels -- Joseph M. Hambrick of Madison; wounded at Calhoun, Ga.

Majors -- F. M. Taylor of Madison.

Adjutants -- Harry F. Christian of Madison.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came*

Jackson -- Henry F. Smith; wounded.

Madison -- Oliver B. Gaston; captured; died in prison.

Wilcox and Monroe -- W. C. Bacot; wounded near Atlanta.

Cherokee -- Thomas W. Hampton; killed at Mossy Creek.

Madison -- W. R. Whitman.

Marshall -- Wm. Fennell.

Jackson -- Flavius J. Graham; wounded near Atlanta.

Marshall -- Henry Milner; resigned. David Davidson; wounded; resigned.

Madison -- Frank B. Gurley.

Lawrence -- H. C. Speake.

* The following were captains in this regiment, but are not assigned to their respective companies in the report furnished: H. A. Gillespie, W. H. Taylor (killed at Decatur), Wm. Smith, Jas. Smith, and Thomas B. Winston. D. C. Kelly of Madison led one of the companies into the service, and was elected Lientenant colonel of Forrest's regiment. D. C. Davis was the first captain of one of the Madison companies, and........Trewhitt of the Cherokee company.

Fifth Alabama

Cavalry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Tuscumbia, in December 1862, and brigaded under Gen. Roddy. Moved into east Tennessee shortly after, and skirmished at Chapel Hill. Captured a wagon train at Hamburg; captured 60 prisoners and a train at Hunt's Mill, in Jackson; blocked the railroad in rear of Rosecrans; captured 130 prisoners at Madison Station; fought Gen. Long at Moulton; stampeded a regiment at Oakville; and was with Gen. Forrest on his brilliant Pulaski raid, with light loss. The Fifth also skirmished with Steedman when he marched into the Tennessee Valley, and was in front of Wilson's corps from Montevallo to Selma. The regiment took part in the defence of Selma, and were mostly captured there. The remainder surrendered at Danville, in Morgan. During its career the Fifth captured 450 of the enemy, besides killing and capturing quite a number.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- Josiah Patterson of Morgan; captured at Selma.

Lieut. Colonels -- James M. Warren; captured at Lagrange; resigned. J. L. M Curry of Talladega.

Majors -- R. F. Gibson of Lawrence; resigned. William Wren of Mississippi.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Morgan -- F. M. Nunn; resigned. E. B. Rice.

Lawrence -- Samuel E. Brown.

Morgan -- F. M. Davis; resigned. Stephen Simpson.

Morgan -- A. H. Rice.

Lawrence -- Philip May; wounded at Hunt's Mill.

Marion -- .... Marchbanks; resigned. Wm. Lloyd.

Fayette -- J. R. Powell; captured at Barton's; transferred.

Tuskaloosa -- J. M. Woodward.

Morgan -- A. M. Patterson.

Franklin and Marion -- Lang C. Allen.

Marion -- J. K. Swope; resigned. John Collier.

Sixth Alabama

Cavalry Regiment

This regiment was organized near Pine Level, early in 1863, as part of Gen. Clanton's brigade. It was first engaged near Pollard, with a column of the enemy that moved out from Pensacola. Ordered then to north Alabama, the Sixth was concerned in several skirmishes, near Decatur, with small loss. During the Atlanta-Dalton campaign the regiment served for several weeks as part of Ferguson's and Armstrong's brigades, and lost quite a number. A portion of the regiment resisted Rousseau at Ten Islands, losing a number killed and captured. Transferred to west Florida, the Sixth fought Steele's column at Bluff Spring, under orders from Col. Armstead, and its loss was severe, especially in prisoners. The remnant fought Gen. Wilson's column, and laid down their arms at Gainesville.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- C. H. Colvin of Pike.

Lieut. Colonels -- W. T. Lary; captured at Ten Islands.

Majors -- E. A. McWhorter of Macon; captured at Ten Islands and Bluff Spring.

Adjutants -- Jo. A. Robertson of Dallas.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Macon and Pike -- C. T. Hardman.

Coffee -- C. S. Lee, Jr.

Tallapoosa -- ... Vaughan.

Henry -- James McRae.

Pike -- W. R. Heard.

Montgomery and Pike -- W. G. Campbell.

Barbour -- Thomas Abercrombie.

State of Florida -- Joseph Keyser.

State of Florida -- J. B. Hutto; wounded at Manning's Mill.

Coosa and Montgomery -- Waddy T. Armstrong.

Seventh Alabama

Cavalry Regiment

This Seventh was organized at Newbern, in Greene, July 22, 1863, and was raised as part of the brigade of Gen. Clanton. Ordered to Pollard, the regiment remained in that vicinity for nearly a year. In the fall of 1864, the Seventh reported to Gen. Forrest at Corinth, and was assigned to Rucker's brigade. It took part in the raid on Johnsonville, and was engaged in the fighting as Hood moved up to Nashville. The Seventh also bore the brunt of the night attack of the enemy at Brentwood, suffering severely in killed and wounded. During Hood's retreat, the regiment fought daily and nightly, repelling the repeated assaults of the enemy's swarm of cavalry. When the Seventh reached Corinth, only 64 rank and file (effective) were left of the 350 with which it began the campaign. After recruiting a few weeks, the regiment joined Gen. Buford, at Montevallo, 300 strong. Ordered to west Florida, the Seventh reached Greenville, then turned and confronted Wilson's corps from Benton to Girard, fighting and obstructing his march. At Girard the regiment was in the line, and took part in the last fighting of the great war. It moved by way of Dadeville and Wetumpka, and surrendered at Gainesville, May 14, 1865.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- Joseph Hodgson of Montgomery.

Lieut. Colonels -- Henry J. Livingston of Autauga; resigned. Turner Clanton of Montgomery.

Majors -- Turner Clanton; promoted. Frank C. Randolph of Montgomery.

Adjutants -- Wm. T. Charles of Montgomery captured, but escaped.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Randolph -- F. C. Randolph; promoted. W. F. M'clintock.

Montgomery -- E. D. Ledyard.

Montgomery -- Britton C. Tarver.

(Cadets) -- Charles P. Storrs; wounded at Columbia.

Shelby -- L. H. Mottier.

Montgomery -- A. H. Bright.

Randolph -- O. P. Knight.

Pickens -- S. V. Ferguson.

Greene -- D. P. Scarborough.

Montgomery -- Dalton Yancey.

Eighth Alabama

Cavalry Regiment

This regiment was organized in April 1864 at Newbern, by adding a company to the nine of Hatch's battalion, which had entered the service the previous winter. Ordered at once to Blue Mountain, the regiment was under General Pillow. Moving into north Georgia, the regiment was in the desperate encounter at Lafayette, with a loss of 30 killed and wounded and about 75 prisoners. Shortly after, the Eighth fought at Rome, losing about 20 men killed and wounded. It was ordered to west Florida soon after, and was in front of Steele as he moved on Pollard. The Eighth surrendered at Gainesville, after some further operations of minor importance.

Field and Staff

Lemuel D. Hatch of Greene was entitled to the colonelcy of this regiment, having recruited it by authority, but Gen. Polk appointed Charles P. Ball of Montgomery colonel, L. D. Hatch lieutenant colonel, and Richard H. Redwood of Mobile major. Pending a discussion of the question, Col. Hatch was wounded and captured (and Major Redwood killed) at LaFayette, and Colonel Ball continued in command, though Hatch's commission as colonel was issued.

Adjutants - J. Catlin Cade of Marengo.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Tuskaloosa -- W. T. Poe.

Tuskaloosa -- L. N. Cole.

Sumter -- James V. Tutt.

Dallas -- M. M. Burke.

Greene -- G. G. Perrin; killed at Pine-barren Creek. Brett Randolph.

Marengo -- E. Charles England.

Tuskaloosa -- W. H. Lawrence; killed at Rome. E. W. Owen.

Chocta -- Eugene C. Rhodes; captured at LaFayette.

Greene -- James Harrison; captured at Lafayette.

Fayette -- W. H. Whitley.

I.-Ninth Alabama

Cavalry Regiment

This regiment was formed near Tullahoma, in May 1863 by consolidating Malone's Twelfth and Thomason's Fourteenth battalions. The former had organized in September 1862, and served in the brigades successively of Genl's J. T. Morgan and J. A. Wharton, fighting at Murfreesboro. The regiment served with Wharton's brigade till December 1863, operating in the vicinity of the Army of Tennessee, and taking part, with some loss, in numerous skirmishes. Brigaded with the First, Third, Fourth, and Fifty-first Alabama cavalry, first under Gen. J. T. Morgan, afterwards under Generals Allen and Hagan, the Ninth was in the battle of Shelbyville with much loss, in the severe and bloody champaign in Tennessee with Longstreet's corps, and in many conflicts in front of the main army. During the Dalton-Atlanta campaign, the Ninth was continually at the exposed points, losing severely in a number of instances. With other portions of Wheeler's cavalry, the regiment followed Sherman eastward, and a remnant surrendered in North Carolina.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- James C. Malone of Limestone; wounded in Tennessee, and at Noonday Creek.

Lieut. Colonels -- Z. Thomason of DeKalb; captured at Shelbyville.

Majors - Eugene Falconett; transferred. Thomas H. Malone of Limestone; captured at Shelbyville.

Adjutants -- Wm. H. Binford of Madison; died in the service. Jerome E. Russell of Limestone.
The men and officers of this regiment were from Limestone, DeKalb, Madison, Morgan, Lauderdale Cherokee, and Lawrence. The following were captains of companies: -- T. H. Malone, promoted; Wm. P. Westmoreland, transferred; Wm. H. Hammock; Robert W. Figg, wounded at Dover, retired; George Mason, wounded at Atlanta; Robert B. Davenport, resigned; James M. Stevenson, killed at Dover; Marcus J. Williams; W. L. Browm, resigned; S. S. Clayton, captured at Shelbyville; S. P. Dobbs, wounded at Shelbyville and in Georgia; Thomas J. McDonald, resigned; John H. Lester, wounded and captured at Dandridge; T. W. Harper; James M. Robinson, wounded and captured; Robert A. McClelland; Wm. E. Wayland, killed at Rome; A. D. Blansitt; James E. Nance, killed in South Carolina; John B. Floyd, wounded at Noonday Creek; Wm. E. Thompson, wounded in Tennessee and at Calhoun; John Green, absent without leave; John White, superceded.

II.-Ninth Alabama

Cavalry Regiment

This regiment was organized at Blue Mountain in the summer of 1864, and was brigaded under Gen. Pillow. It operated in the vicinity of the Army of Tennessee while it lay at Dalton, and was with General Pillow for about eight months. Transferred to Clanton's brigade, the Ninth fought under that officer at Ten Islands, with some loss. It was soon after sent to west Florida, and there made head against Steele's column at Bluff Spring, losing a number. The regiment then resisted Wilson's corps, and in May laid down its arms at Gainesville.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- Henry J. Livingston of Autauga.

Lieut. Colonels -- Thomas L. Faulkner of Autauga.

Majors -- R. J. Moses of Russell.

Adjutants -- Chas. E. Stewart of Dallas; transferred to line.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Autauga and Bibb -- W. C. C. Cleveland.

Greene and Perry -- .... Horton; resigned. Geo. Goldthwaite.

Montgomery -- Thomas Orme; resigned. John A. Floyd.

Shelby -- John Moore; killed at Ten Islands J. F. Watson; killed near Pollard. Charles E. Stewart.

Franklin -- T. J. Atkinson; wounded near Decatur; wounded near Guntersville.

Marshall -- Samuel Henry.

Walker -- F. H. Musgrove.

St. Clair -- John W. W. Wharton.

Chambers -- .... Smith.

Russell -- [A company always on detached duty.]

Tenth Alabama

Cavalry Regiment

This was a regiment organized in the winter of 1863-'4, to constitute part of Roddy's command. Richard 0. Pickett of Lauderdale was the colonel, and the men were from the northern counties of Alabama. The services of the regiment were confined in a great measure to outpost operations in the Tennessee valley, though it participated in the Pulaski raid, and other encounters and forays.

Eleventh Alabama

Cavalry Regiment

The nucleus of this regiment was a battalion that served for some time under Gen. Forrest, and was commanded by Col. Jeffrey Forrest. Soon after the latter's death, the command was increased to a regiment, and re-organized. It was with Forrest in the attack on Athens and Sulphur Trestle, and in the fight at Pulaski, losing very severely in casualties on the expedition. The regiment rendered effective service to Gen. Hood. It was part of Roddy's force at Montevallo, and was in front of Wilson's column to Selma; At the assault on the works there, the Eleventh was in the trenches, and nearly all its men retired therefrom, as the part of the line held by them was not assailed. The regiment laid down its arms at Decatur.

Field and Staff

Colonels - John R. Burtwell of Lauderdale.

Lieut. Colonels - John Doan of Mississippi.

Adjutants - David Halsey of Franklin.
Four of the companies were from Franklin county, under Captains C. Hyatt, John Steele, Thomas Bonner, and Parker Rand; two from Lauderdale, Captains John Barr and Y. A. Gray; one from Morgan, Captain Z. F. Freeman; one from Limestone, Captain S. MeDonald; and two from the State of Mississippi, Captains Van Flake and J. A. Akers.

Twelfth Alabama

Cavalry Regiment

The nucleus of the Twelfth was a battalion recruited by Lieut. Col. Wm. H. Hundley of Madison, and Major Bennett of St. Clair. This (the Twelfth) battalion operated in east Tennessee for some months, and was consolidated with the First Alabama while the army lay at Murfreesboro. It fought thus at Murfreesboro and Chicamauga, and through Longstreet's east Tennessee campaign. Soon after the latter operations, four companies were added, and the regiment thus formed took the name of the Twelfth Alabama. Attached to Hagan's brigade, the regiment took part in the retrograde movement from Dalton, and was engaged in numerous encounters. One of its companies lost 20 killed and wounded while defending a bridge near Rome. At Atlanta, July 22, Gen. Wheeler complimented the regiment on the field, and it lost 25 or 30 men in a hilt to hilt melee with Stoneman's raiders. At Campbellsville, the Twelfth repulsed Brownlow's brigade, losing 45 men. At Averysboro and the attack on Kilpatrick, and other places, the regiment fought till the end. It disbanded the night before the surrender—about 125 present.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- Warren S. Reese of Montgomery.

Lieut. Colonels -- Marcellus Pointer of Mississippi; wounded.

Majors -- A. J. Ingraham of Blount; disabled by accident.

Adjutants -- O. P. Casey of Cherokee; killed at Bentonville.
The companies were from Jefferson (two), Captains Musgrove, killed at Fayetteville; and W. A. White. From St. Clair, Capt. A. D. Bennett. Jackson, Capt. Wharton. Blount, Capt. Donaldson, resigned, Capt. Weaver, killed at Bentonville. Calhoun, Capt. Scurry. Madison, Capt. Shepherd. Cherokee, Capt. Wm. Lokey, resigned; James Maxwell. State of Georgia, Capt. McKinney. State of' Tennessee, Capt. Saunders; company detached.

Fourth Alabama

Battalion

This was made up of three companies from this State, which marched to Virginia in 1862. One was from Pike, Capt. A. P. Love (captured at Dinwiddie); and two from Barbour, Captains McKenzie and Roberts. They were organized, and made part of the Phillips Legion, Hampton's cavalry. The battalion followed the feather of Stuart through many of his most brilliant forays, and were with Hampton on many hard-fought fields.

Fifth Alabama

Battalion

This battalion organized near Dumfries, Va., in December 1861. Attached to Whiting's brigade, it was soon transferred to Hood's. Sent to Richmond, the battalion was placed in Archer's brigade, and fought at Mechanicsville, Cold Harbor, and Frazier's Farm, with heavy loss. It was engaged at the second Manassas with large loss, and with like result at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. The battalion lost half of the 200 it had engaged at Gettysburg, and was then placed on provost duty in A. P. Hill's corps. It remained in Virginia till the end, losing several on the march to Appomattox, where 30 or 40 were present.

Major -- A. S. Vandegraff of Sumter; wounded before Richmond, and at Fredericksburg.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Sumter -- Jas Winston; resigned. Wade Ritter; wounded at the second Manassas.

Calhoun -- T. B. Bush; killed at second Manassas. A. N. Porter; wounded at Fredericksburg.

Calhoun -- Elijah T. Smith; resigned. ...... Burton; killed at first Cold Harbor. David Stewart; killed at Chancellorsville. James Reese.

Mobile -- ... Covington; superceded. C. Hooper (company disbanded).

Eighteenth Alabama

Battalion

This was meant for a local organization, and consisted of five companies of men, mounted originally. Organized in the summer of 1862, in Jackson County, the battalion was engaged in numerous encounters with the enemy along the line of the Tennessee. In November it was dismounted by consent, and in January 1863 joined the army of Tennessee at Tullahoma. Attached to Wood's brigade, the battalion lost heavily at Chicamauga. It was thenceforward a part of Cleburne's fire-tried division throughout the campaigns of that army, fighting, marching, and suffering almost without intermission till its colors were furled in North Carolina. For the sake of convenience, the battalion was attached to the Thirty-third Alabama, without losing its distinctive organization.

The only field officer was a major, as follows: William T. Gunter of Jackson; resigned. John G. Gibson; killed at Chicamauga. Jasper J. Jones of Jackson; captured at Mission Ridge.

Nearly all the men were from Jackson, and in five compnies, commanded by Captains Jasper J. Jones, (promoted), George E. Cowan, George W. Rodgers, G. M. Ingalls, and Montgomery Money.

Twenty-Third Alabama

Battalion

This command was organized at Charleston, Tenn., Nov. 25, 1863, and consisted of three companies of the first battalion of Hilliard's Legion. The men had gone through the Kentucky campaign, and the iron hail of Chicamauga. The battalion participated in the east Tennessee campaign of Longstreet, and reached Richmond in April. It lost heavily at Drewry's, and in the freguent skirmishes and battles during the siege of Petersburg. A mere handful were left to surrender at Appomattox.

Major.- Nicholas Stallworth of Conecuh; (wounded at Chicamauga as captain).

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Conecuh -- W. E. Broughton; killed at Drewry's. Samuel Salter.

Chambers -- ........Daniels; resigned. ...... White; wounded; retired. Lieut. Lampley commanded.

Montgomery -- William Maddleton.

First Confederate Regiment

This was one of Gen. Wheeler's best cavalry regiments, and there was a company, perhaps two, of Alabamians in it from the northwest quarter of the State. The regiment served throughout the war, and on many battle-fields. None of the field officers were Alabamians.

Third Confederate Regiment

This was another of Gen. Wheeler's commands, and seven of the companies were Alabamians. The regiment operated around the army of Tennessee, and was in several battles and raids, and in innumerable skirmishes. It lost severely in more than one of these fights, and its penons floated till the Confederacy was no more.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- I. B. Howard; resigned. W. N. Estes; killed near Chattanooga. P. H. Rice; wounded in Georgia.

Lieut. Colonels -- W. N. Estes; promoted. P. E. Rice of Jackson; promoted. G. C. Sandusky of Tennessee; resigned. John McCaskill of Wilcox; wounded.

Majors -- W. N. Estis; promoted. G. C. Sandusky; promoted. John McCaskill; promoted. F. M. Corn of DeKalb; resigned. F. C. Reees of Tennessee.

Adjutants -- D. C. Nicholson; transferred. N. Rothrock; killed at Murfreesboro.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

DeKalb -- F. M. Corn; promoted. J. T. Hogue.

DeKalb --..... Lynch; resigned. Henry Small.

DeKalb -- R. B. Lankford.

Wilcox -- John McCaskill; promoted. To. Robinson.

State of Georgia -- ......Pope; resigned. W. A. Williamson.

State of Georgia -- John Bates; resigned. ... Edmondson.

Jackson -- P. H. Rice; promoted. J. T. Witherspoon.

State of Tennessee -- G. C. Sandusky; promoted. W. P. Moore.

DeKalb -- Daniel Clayton; wounded.

Eighth Confederate Regiment

This regiment was organized just after the battle of Shiloh by the consolidation of Brewer's, Bell's, and Baskerville's battalions--six Alabama, and four Mississippi companies. Brewer's battalion was among the first mounted troops raised in Alabama, and had fought at Shiloh with severe loss. The Eighth Confederate marched with the army into Kentucky, and was engaged in a series of bloody encounters, extending up to and subsequent to the battle of Murfreesboro. It was in Wheeler's dash on Rosecrans' rear during that battle, and was badly cut in two or three cavalry fights shortly after. The regiment lost very severely at Shelbyville, and was engaged at Chicamauga. Near Dalton, May 1864, the regiment had a protracted fight, with heavy loss. During the Dalton-Atlanta campaign the regiment fought as infantry nearly the whole time. It was engaged at Jonesboro, and in the captured of Stoneman. It was with Wheeler in his last grand raid into Tennessee, fighting often, then moved into Virginia, and fought Burbridge at Saltville. The Eighth then pursued Sherman into the Carolinas, sad was in constant contact with him till it surrendered at Greenesboro, less than 100 strong.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- R. H. Brewer of Maryland; resigned.* W. B. Wade of Mississippi; wounded in east Tennessee; transferred. John S. Prather of Chambers; wounded.

Lieut. Colonels --.... Baskerville of Mississipi; resigned. Jefferson Falkner of Chambers; resigned. John S. Prather; promoted. John Wright of Tallapoosa.

Majors -- Solon Bell of Chambers; resigned. John S. Prather; promoted. C. C. McCaa of Pickens; killed at Murfreesboro. John Wright; wounded at Shelbyville; promoted. Knox Miller of Talladega.

Adjutants -- L. L. Goodrich of Mississippi.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Talladega -- A. W. Bowie; resigned. .... Stockdale; transferred. Knox Miller; promoted.

Chambers -- Jefferson Falkner; promoted. Robert Moore.

Pickens -- C. C. McCaa; promoted. W. M. Ferguson; captured.

Randolph -- ..... Thompson; captured in Tennessee; John H. McElroy; killed near Dalton. Joseph A. Mathews of Mississippi; killed near Columbia. S. C.

Tallapoosa -- John Wright; promoted. .... Lindsey; captured in Tennessee.

Chambers -- Francis Pinckard; died in the service. Henry Holmes; wounded at Boonsville and Jonesboro.

* Col. Brewer was a graduate of West Point. Promoted to the rank of brigadier general, he was killed in battle in the Valley of Virginia in 1864.

Tenth Confederate Regiment (Cavalry)

This regiment was organized at Murfreesboro, by consolidating the battalions of Goode and Slaughter*--the latter being the cavalry of Hilliard's legion, which had passed through the Kentucky campaign. Brigaded under General Pegram, the Tenth lost 8 killed, 19 wounded, and 62 captured at Monticello. After operating in east Tennessee, the regiment raided into Kentucky, and fought in a half dozen severe conflicts, losing 160 men in all. Surprised at Jimtown, the regiment lost about 50 men, mostly captured. At Chicamauga the Tenth fought under Forrest, and lost heavily. Placed in Wade's (afterwards Hume's and Robinson's) brigade, Kelly's division, with the First and Third Confederate and a Georgia and Louisiana regiment, the Tenth lost largely at Resaca and New Hope, and performed arduous duty during the Dalton-Atlanta campaign. It was then in Wheeler's last raid, moving as far as Saltville, Va. Having returned to assist Gen. Hood, the Tenth proceded to the Carolinas, and was engaged at Bentonville. It surrendered with Johnson's army, 300 strong.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- C. T. Goode of Georgia; wounded at Chicamauga; retired. John B. Rudolph of Lowndes; resigned. Wm. J. Vason of Georgia, wounded at Bentonville.

Lieut. Colonels -- M. M. Slaughter of Talladega; wounded at Cleveland; retired. Wm. J. Vason; promoted.

Majors -- John B. Rudolph; wounded at New Hope; promoted. T. F. Holt of Georgia.

Adjutants -- John M. McKleroy of Barbour; transferred to line. Jos. E. Mitchell of Virginia; captured in Kentucky.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Chambers -- Peter M. Rowland; resigned. Charles Phillips; resigned. John M. McKleroy.

Tallapoosa -- M. G. Slaughter; resigned. John Slaughter.

Randolph -- William Smith; resigned. J. J. Clements; wounded and captured at Jimtown.

Lowndes -- (John B. Rudolph while in battalion; promoted). James Maynard; resigned. Thomas A. Knight; wounded at Resaca.

Talladega -- . . . Barnes; captured in Kentucky; died in prison. John Hendricks.

Barbour -- James Brazier.

[The other four companies were Georgians.]

*Slaughter's (the 17th Alabama) battalion was commanded by M. M. Slaughter of Talladega as major, and had five companies.

Fifteenth Confederate Regiment

This regiment was organized at Mobile in the spring of 1864, and made up of companies which had picketed the coast for two or three years. It remained in the vicinity of Mobile till the fall, when it moved into Louisiana, and was engaged in a brilliant affair at Tunica. The Fifteenth also made head against Smith's army, with small loss. The regiment disbanded at the downfall of the Confederacy, except two or three companies, which were paroled at Demopolis.

Field and Staff

Colonels -- Harry Maury of Mobile.

Lieut. Colonels -- Thomas J. Myers of Florida.

Majors -- Robert Partridge of Florida.

Adjutants -- Wm. R. Jordan of Florida.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Mobile -- John H. Marshall; wounded and captured at Mississippi City.

Mobile -- Wm. Cottrill; resigned. E. T. Arrington.

Mobile -- J. E. Murrell.

Baldwin -- T. C. Barlow.

Chocta -- John McKellar.

[The other five companies were from Florida.]

First Confederate Battalion

There were three Alabama companies in this battalion, made up mainly of recruits from the Second Alabama (as its time was expiring), in the spring of 1862. There were three other companies, one each from Florida, Georgia, and Tennessee. The battalion fought at Corinth with small loss; and in Tilghman's brigade, Loring's division, was at Baker's Creek with few casualties. Part of the battalion was captured at Vicksburg, the other portion fought at Jackson. Ordered to Virginia in the winter of 1863-64, the battalion was placed in Davis' brigade, Heth's division. It was engaged at the Wilderness, the second Cold Harbor, and in the trenches of Petersburg, losing severely, especially at the attempt to drive the enemy from the Weldon Railroad. At Hatcher's Run (April 2, 1865), the battalion was captured, with the entire brigade; but it was greatly reduced in numbers.

Field and Staff

Lieut. Colonels -- George Hoke Forney of Calhoun; killed at the Wilderness. F. B. McClung of Franklin.

Majors -- L. W. O'Bannon* of Louisiana; transferred. Geo. H. Forney; promoted. F. B. McClung; promoted. A. M. O'Neal of Lauderdale.

Adjutants -- W. J. Scott of Calhoun; wounded at second Cold Harbor.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

Mobile, Calhoun, Jackson -- Geo. H. Forney; promoted. A. M. O'Neal; promoted.

Mobile -- F. B. McClung; promoted. Mike Donahue; killed at Weldon Railroad.

Mobile -- M. M. Kenny.

The other companies, from Florida, Georgia, and Tennessee, were originally under Captains J. M. Johnson, Lee, and Bartlett, respectively.

*O'Bannon and Forney were majors before the battalion was entitled to a lieutenant colonel by the addition of the Tennessee and Georgia companies.

First Alabama Battalion

of Artillery

This command was recruited at Mobile, Montgomery, Selma, and Eufaula, as part of the "Army of Alabama," and was organized about the first of 1861, at Fort Morgan. In the spring the command was transferred to the Confederate government as "regulars." Stationed at Fort Morgan and its dependencies, the battalion attained a high degree of discipline, in so much that the federal Gen. Granger pronounced it the most perfect body of either army. Detachments of it manned the heavy artillery at Forts Gaines and Powell, and rendered effective service. During the terrific bombardment of Fort Morgan, the battalion, "moved by no weak fears," handled the guns till they were all knocked out of position, losing 150 killed and wounded of about 500 engaged. The men were taken to Elmira, N. Y., where fully half died of smallpox; and the officers to Fort Warren.

Field and Staff.*

Lieut. Colonels -- Robert C. Forsyth of Mobile; resigned. James T. Gee of Dallas; captured at Fort Morgan.

Majors -- S. S. Tucker;** died in the service. James T. Gee of Dallas; promoted. J. M. Cary of Barbour; captured at Fort Morgan.

Captains, and Counties from Which the Companies Came.

"A" -- Wm. Walker of Mobile; died in the service. Wm. B. Hughes of Montgomery wounded and captured at Fort Morgan.

"B" -- John J. Winston of Greene; resigned. Wm. Wellborn of Barbour. Frederick S. Ferguson of Macon; captured at Fort Morgan.

"C" -- James T. Gee; promoted. J. M. Carey; promoted. N. J. Smith of Perry; wounded and captured at Fort Morgan.

"D" -- Junius A. Law of Macon; resigned. Lee Hammond of Madison; captured at Fort Morgan.

"E" -- J. Q. Loomis of Coosa; resigned. J. W. Whiting of Montgomery; captured at Fort Morgan.

"F" -- Edwin Wallace of Madison; relieved. W. R. Julian of Franklin; resigned. R. N. Campbell of Marengo; captured at Fort Morgan.

*Majors Tucker and Gee commanded for a year or two before a lieutenant colonel was appointed.
**Gen. Tucker was a native of Vermont, and a graduate of West Point. He served with distinction in Mexico and Nicaragua, and his commission as major general arrived a few days after his death.

Ketchum's-Garrity's Battery

This battery of light artillery was organized at Mobile in May 1861, and the officers and men were from that county. It went to Pensacola, and remained there till May 1861. It lost 7 killed and wounded, and several horses at Shiloh. Attached to Ruggles' brigade, it was engaged at Farmington without loss. Moving into Kentucky as part of Chalmers' brigade, its loss was light at Mumfordville. At Perryville and Wildcat-Gap the battery fought, with a few casualties at the latter place. At Murfreesboro its loss was 27 men killed and wounded, and 30 horses. The battery was more fortunate at Chicamauga, but lost several men and two guns at Mission Ridge. The battery was in Sherman's way day and night as he moved on Atlanta, and suffered very considerably. It fought at Franklin and Nashville, with small loss, and endured the siege of Spanish Fort with only two men killed. The battery surrendered at Meridian.

Captains -- Wm. H. Ketchum; resigned. Wm. H. Homer; resigned. James Garrity; wounded at Murfreesboro and Marietta.

Lieutenants -- Wm. H. Homer; promoted. David Bush; resigned. John A. Yuille; resigned. John Slaughter; resigned. James Garrity; promoted. David Bond; killed at Jonesboro. Maynard Hassell; killed near Atlanta. Henry Ferrell. Jonathan Pressler. John W. Jackson.

Jeff. Davis Artillery

This battery was organized in May 1861, at Selma, and was composed of men from Dallas, Perry, Butler, Lowndes, and Morengo. Furnished with eight guns, it went to Virginia a month later. At Manassas it was attached to Early's brigade for some months. The battery was engaged at Seven Pines, and at the first Cold Harbor lost 18 men and 28 horses killed and wounded. As part of Carter's artillery battalion, the battery fought at Boonsboro, and suffered severely at Sharpsburg. It manned the crest at Fredericksburg, and fought with Jackson's corps at Chancellorsville with light loss. The battalion was also engaged in frequent skirmishes soon afterwards, and the music of its voice was heard at the Wilderness. But at Spottsylvania the battery was charged, and lost three guns and half the command captured. They were not exchanged, and the other part of the command served with a battery in Carter's artillery regiment till the peace.

Captains -- J. T. Montgomery of Dallas; resigned. J. W. Bondurant of Marengo; promoted gradually to the rank of colonel of artillery. Wm. J. Reese of Montgomery, wounded at Bealton; captured at Spottsylvania.

Lieutenants-- A. R. Sheppard of Perry; resigned. C. W. Lovelace of Dallas; resigned. Wm. Fitts; resigned. Wm. J. Reese; resigned. Robert Walker of Dallas; resigned. J. W. Bondurant; promoted. Robert Yeldell of Butler; resigned. H. P. Thomas of Bibb; resigned. D. E. Bates of Marengo; captured at Spottsylvania. John Mitchell of Dallas.

Hardaway's Battery

This battery was recruited in Russell, Macon, and Tallapoosa, and was provided with tents, side-arms, camp equipage, &c., at the private expense of its first captain. It reached Virginia in June 1861, and remained at Manassas till March 1862. Thenceforth the record of Hardaway's battery was that of the immortal Army of Northern Virginia. Its guns roared at Seven Pines, Mechanicsville, the first Cold Harbor, White-oak Swamp, Sharpsburg, Shepherdstown, Upperville, Port Royal, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Mine Run, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Hanover Junction, the second Cold Harbor, Dutch Gap, Deep Bottom, Fussell's Mill, Fort Field, Fort Gilmer, Fort Harrison, Henrico Poorhouse, Darbytown Road, Appomattox, and in numerous other stubborn conflicts of lesser note. The long range and soft whir of its Whitworth bolts were the pride of the service. The losses of the battery were severe in a number of engagements, for it was ever active and bold in its movements.

Captains--Robert A. Hardaway of Macon; promoted. Wm. B. Hurt of Russell; wounded at Gettysburg; promoted. George Arch Ferrell of Russell.

Lieutenants--Wm. B. Hurt; promoted. John W. Tullis of Pike; wounded and captured at Gettysburg; detached. G. A. Ferrell; promoted. Jesse H. Crenshaw of Russell. John Andrew Jackson of Russell.

Waters' Battery

This command was organized at Mobile city, in October 1861, and the men and officers were from there. The battery remained in the defence of that city till the spring of '62, when it moved to Corinth. It was in the Kentucky campaign losing lightly at Mumfordville, and none at Perryville. It suffered severely at Murfreesboro, where it was in Manigault's brigade. At Chicamauga the battery was engaged without loss; but at Mission Ridge it lost three guns and half its force were captured. The other half were distributed in Cobb's (Kentucky) and Mayberry's (Tennessee) battery, and served till the end.

Captains -- David Waters; promoted.

Lieutenants --Wm. Hamilton. Charles Watkins. Samuel Battle. James M. Muldon; resigned. ... Turner.

Gage's Battery

This battery was organized at Mobile, October 1861, and was composed of Mobilians. It remained in the defences of the city during the winter. It was then sent to Tennessee, and suffered severely at Shiloh. The battery was then sent back to Mobile, and remained in garrison there till the city was evacuated. It was surrendered with the department at Meridian.

Captains--Charles P. Gage; resigned. James Hill; resigned. James H. Hutchisson.

Lieutenants--James Hill; promoted. Daniel Geary; till re-organized. George Johnson; till re-organized. Francis Titcomb; till re-organized. James H. Hutchisson; promoted. Richard H. Wilkins; resigned. Thomas H. Shaw. Cleveland King; resigned. John T. Ellison. John S. Treat. F. H. Stanard.

Waddell's Battery

This battery was organized in February 1862 by an order allowing 20 men to be taken from each company of the Sixth Alabama. Equipped with eight guns, the battery was in the Kentucky campaign. Sent to Mississippi with Stevenson's division, the battery was badly cut up and lost nearly all of its guns at Baker's Creek. It lost quite a number during the siege of Vicksburg, and was there captured. Exchanged, the battery was divided into the two that follow.

Captains -- James F. Waddell of Russell.

Lieutenants -- W. D. Emery of Montgomery; wounded at Vicksburg. R. H. Bellamy, Alonzo O'Neal, A. H. Burch. Jefferson Bates, and Robert Harvey, all of Russell.

Emery's Battery

This was part of "Waddell's Battery," and was organized at Columbus, Georgia, in November 1863. Ordered to Dalton, the record of the battery is blended with that of the Army of Tennessee during the memorable campaign of 1864. It was part of Major Waddell's battalion--Emery's, Barrett's, and Bellamy's batteries. The battery sternly confronted Wilson at Girard, and there the guns and two-thirds of the men were captured.

Captains-- W. D. Emery of Montgomery.

Lieutenants -- A. H. Burch, Jefferson Bates, M. M. Allen, R. H. Boykin, all of Russell.

Bellamy's Battery

This command was the other half of Waddell's battery, and was organized at Columbus, Ga., November 1863. Sent to Dalton, the battery participated in the almost incessant battle back to Atlanta, but its loss was not severe. Ordered to Columbus, the battery fought Wilson at Girard, and the men were dispersed or captured, and the guns abandoned.

Captains.-R. H. Bellamy of Russell.

Lieutenants.-Alonzo O'Neal of Russell; killed at Marietta. Robert Harvey, and J. T. Holland of Russell.

Selden's-Lovelace's"-Battery

The men of this command were chiefly from Marengo, Perry, Dallas, and Shelby, and it was organized at Uniontown in the spring of 1862. After a short time passed at Columbus, Miss., the battery went to Mobile, and remained there nearly two years. Having joined the main army, the battery was engaged at Resaca, Cassville, Kennesa, New Hope, Peachtree, losing lightly in each, and was complimented on the field at the latter place by Gen. Reynolds. At Jonesboro the battery lost four killed, and several wounded. It was engaged in the further operations of that army, and at Nashville lost several killed and had its guns captured. The remainder surrendered at Meridian.

Captains -- Joseph Selden of Perry. Charles W. lovelace of Dallas; captured at Nashville.

Lieutenants -- R. H. Jones; resigned. ... Murfree; resigned. C. W. Lovelace; promoted. E. C. England of Marengo; relieved. L. W. Duggar of Marengo. C. C. Smoot of Shelby. W. M. Selden of Perry.

Eufaula Light Artillery

This command was organized at Eufaula, Feb. 26, 1862, and was composed of men from Barbour and adjoining counties--262 rank and file. Equipped with six guns, the battery joined the Army of Tennessee, and participated in its campaigns and operations till the end, losing 48 men killed and wounded, and 36 by disease, during its sernce. It was surrendered at Meridian, Miss.

Captains--John W. Clark; resigned. W. A. McTyere; resigned. M. D. Oliver; killed at Atlanta. William J. McKenzie.

Lieutenants--W. A. McTyere; promoted. M. D. Oliver; promoted. W. J. McKenzie; promoted. W. H. Woods; F. M. Caldwell.

Sengstak's-Barrett's Battery

This company was organized at Mobile, December 1861 and remained there and at Columbus, Miss., till September 1862. The battery was engaged at Corinth and Hatchee, with small loss at the latter. During the winter that followed, the battery operated in north Mississippi. It was part of the ill-fated garrison of Vicksburg, where it lost largely in casualties, and was captured. When exchanged, the men were assigned to Barrett's, (Missouri) battery, and joined the Army of Tennessee. During the Dalton-Atlanta campaign, Barrett's battery in a battalion commanded by Major Waddell of Russell—was constantly engaged, and lost considerably. Ordered to Columbus, it took part in the battle of Girard, and most of the men, and all the guns, were there captured.

Captains -- Hermann H. Sengstak of Mobile; transferred.

Lieutenants -- Wm. P. Leslie of Monroe; resigned. A. P. St. John of Mobile; transferred. Stanley H. Bell of Greene; wounded at Vicksburg; transferred.

Fowler's-Phelan's Battery

This battery was as organized in January 1862, at Tuscaloosa. It was composed chiefly of men who had served a year in Virginia as a company in the Fifth Alabama Infantry, having volunteered with R. E. Rodes as captain. The company was the first organization that re-enlisted "for the war." The battery was on duty at Mobile for about a year. Having joined the main army, at Tullahoma, the battery was part of Walthall's brigade at Chicamauga, and there lost 10 killed, and 18 wounded, and 16 horses. At Mission Ridge the battery had several wounded. Placed in Cheatham's division, the battery lost 6 killed and 9 wounded. On the retreat from Dalton, the guns were served almost daily, and suffered considerably. Moving with Gen. Hood into Tennessee, the battery was engaged at Franklin and Nashville, losing 8 killed and wounded at the latter battle. The battery was stationed at Mobile till the close of the war, and surrendered with 130 men.

Captains--Wm. H. Fowler of Tuskaloosa; transferred. John Phelan of Montgomery, wounded at Resaca.

Lieutenants-- John Phelan; promoted. Robert O. Perrin of Greene; resigned. N. Venable of Tuskaloosa. Wm. Dailey of Tuscaloosa; killed at Resaca. A. P. Hinton of Perry. Samuel W. Reeves of Tuscaloosa.

"Andrews"-"Lee's"-Battery.

This company was organized at Norfolk, Va., January 1862, and the men were from Montgomery. The majority of the men had served a year as a company in the Third Alabama Infantry. Some months later, the battery was sent to North Carolina, and was on garrison duty on the coast. It assisted in the capture of Plymouth with small loss, and blew up Fort Branch when the Confederate line at Petersburg was broken, and tried to join Gen. Johnston. The battery disbanded at Ridgeway, N. C., April 1865.

Captains.- W. G. Andrews; relieved. Edgar J. Lee of Montgomery.

Lieutenants.- E. R. Spalding; resigned. E. J. Lee; promoted. J. E. Davis. Wm. F. Williams. Sid. S. McWhorter.

Haynie's Battery

This was also a Mobile battery, and was organized in that city, October 1861. It remained there till May 1862, then tarried at Columbus, several months. Sent to Corinth unequipped, the men served with other batteries till the siege of Vicksburg, when the battery was organized, and suffered in casualties while in charge of the heavy guns. Captured and paroled, the battery was on garrison duty at Mobile, and one or two other points, till the struggle closed.

Captains--John D. Haynie.

Lieutenants--John G. Cleveland; resigned. Thomas Emanuel; killed at Vicksburg. .... Morris John Schlater.

Charpentier's Battery

The men and officers of this company were from Mobile, and organized for light artillery service in October 1861. The battery remained in the defences of Mobile city till June 1863, when it was sent to Mississippi. Placed in Featherston's brigade, the battery fought at Jackson with light loss. Ordered to Dalton, it was in the first part of the retrograde movement of the army from Dalton, losing horses by one shell at Resaca. The battery then proceeded to Selma to re-equip. It went thence as flying artillery with Gen. Forrest, and fought at Rome, Ga. Having returned to Selma, the battery participated in the defence of the place, and was there captured.

Captains.- Stephen Charpentier; resigned. John Jenks.

Lieutenants.- John Jenks; promoted. L. H. Goodman. William Lee. Samuel Miller.

Lumsden's Battery

This company was recruited at Tuskaloosa, and reported for duty at Mobile, November 1861,125 strong. Stationed at Fort Gaines till, after Shiloh, the battery relieved Gage's at Tupelo, and were given six guns. The battery skirmished at Farmington, and in the Kentucky campaign fought at Perryville with small loss. At Chicamauga there were several casualties, and the battery lost a gun. Its pieces moved down the road from Dalton to Atlanta, and 5 killed and 2.5 wounded was the number of its casualties. The battery's loss was small around Atlanta; but, having marched with the army into Tennessee, it was overwhelmed at Nashville, losing its guns, six men killed, and 22 captured. Placed in Spanish Fort, the garrison was under fire for two weeks, with some loss. Moving up to Marion Station, (Miss.), the battery was surrendered with the department.

Captains -- C. L. Lumsden.

Lieutenants -- George Vaughan; made surgeon. H. H. Cribbs; resigned. G. H. Hargrove; wounded at Nashville. Ed. Tarrant; resigned. A. C. Hargrove; wounded at Spanish Fort. John A. Caldwell; wounded at Spanish Fort.

Semple's Battery

This command was organized at Montgomery, in March 1862, and the officers and men were nearly all from Montgomery County. Ordered to Mobile, it soon after joined the Arms of Tennessee. It marched into Kentucky, and was engaged at Perryville with light loss. Two sections fought in the last day's battle at Murfreesboro, losing a third of the men, two guns, and nearly every horse. At Dug Gap the loss was inconsiderable, but serious at Chicamauga. The battery was engaged at Mission Ridge without loss, and one section suffered severely at Ringgold Gap. The loss of men and horses at Resaca was considerable, and the battery was fully occupied with the work of death on the retreat to Atlanta. In the battle of July 22, and at Jonesboro, the loss was quite severe. The guns of the battery were the first that opened at Franklin, but its loss there and at Nashville was comparatively light. Ordered to North Carolina, the battery reached Augusta, and there surrendered.

Captains -- Henry C. Semple; promoted. R. W. Goldthwaite.

Lieutenants -- Elmore F. Fitzpatrick; detached. John B. Scott; resigned. R. W. Goldthwaite; promoted. E. Gl. McClellan; killed at Resaca. Charles Dowd ;* wounded at Resaca. Joseph Pollard; killed at Murfreesboro. Derrill M. Hart. Henry Armstrong.

*This officer was from Mobile; the others from Montgomery.

Kolb's Battery

In April 1862, the " Barbour Light Artillery " was organized at Eufaula with about 325 officers and men, and with W. N. Reeves as captain, and R. F. Kolb, F. D. McLennan, Robert Cherry, and Pat Powers as lieutenants. Proceeding to Montgomery, the company was divided into two, and with two other companies, organized as the artillery battalion of Hilliard's legion, with W. N. Reeves as major. Having reached Chattanooga, only one of the companies was equipped as artillery—the others continuing with the legion as infantry. This company, under Capt. R. F Kolb, was in the Kentucky campaign, and in east Tennessee for some time. It then shared the fortunes of the Army of Tennessee, fighting at Chicamauga, on the Dalton-Atlanta campaign, and in Hood's Tennessee movement. Ordered to North Carolina, the battery got as far as Augusta when the surrender occurred. Of the men of the company, about 45 died of disease in the service, and about 70 were killed or wounded.

Tarrant's Battery

This command was organized in June 1863, and the men were from the western counties of the State. It remained at Pollard for some months, and joined the Army of Tennessee at Dalton. The battery participated in the battles of Resaca, Cassville, Lost Mountain, New Hope, Kennesa, Peach-tree, and Atlanta, and suffered more or less in each. It then moved towards Tennessee, and was under fire at Decatur from the gunboats. At Nashville one section of the battery was captured entire, after hard fighting, and so many men and horses killed in the other that the guns could not be drawn off. Ordered to Blakeley, the men there manned eight heavy pieces, endured the perils of that siege, fired the last gun at the victor foe, and was there surrendered.

Captains -- Ed. Tarrant of Tuskaloosa; captured at Blakeley.

Lieutenants -- Seth Shepard of Perry; captured at Nashville. B. B. Hardwick of Tuskaloosa; wounded at Kennesa; at Nashville. E. W. Tarrant of Tuskaloosa; captured at Blakeley.

Clanton's Battery

This command was organized at Pine Level, in Montgomery, June 1863, and composed of men from that and adjoining counties. Attached to Gen. Clanton's brigade, the battery was at Pollard and Mobile for some time, then in northeast Alabama and north Georgia. One section was engaged in a fight at Rome, and the battery fought at Girard, where the guns were captured. The surrender of the men soon followed.

Captains-- N. H. Clanton of Macon.

Lieutenants -- R. J. Swearingen of Macon. Henry Goldthwaite of Montgomery. Charles Howard of Macon.

Ward's-Cruse's Battery

This command was recruited in Madison, and served in the Army of Tennessee. Capt. Ward was succeeded in the command of it by Capt. S. R. Cruse of Madison.*

*After diligent effort, no satisfactory information was obtained of this battery.

Miscellaneous Commands

There were two companies of mounted Alabamians in the "Jeff Davis Legion," an organization that served in Virginia throughout the war. One of the companies was from Sumter, under Capt. Wm. M. Stone, who was promoted, and succeeded by A. K. Ramsey as captain. The other was from Marengo, Capt. Tayloe, who was succeeded by Ivey Lewis as captain.
In the regiment recruited by Col. (afterwards Gen.) Wirt Adams of Mississippi there were two Alabama companies. One was from Clarke, under Stephen B. Cleveland as captain, who was promoted, and succeeded by John Y. Kilpatrick. The other company was from Lowndes, with S. J. Fagg as captain, who resigned, and was succeeded by M. B. Bowie.
There were three or four companies from the State in Georgia and Tennessee regiments, from counties bordering on those States.
Thirty or forty men of Pelham's battery were from Talladega and Calhoun, under Lieut. Wm. McGregor of the former county.
A number of Alabamians were also in the battery of Capt. C:. B. Farrell of Georgia. They were from Chambers and Randolph, under Lieut. Nathan Davis.
There were others in the battery of Capt. S. H. Dent of Barbour, and in that of Capt. Thrall of Forrest's corps.
There were also several regiments of "reserves" or militia towards the close of the war. A detachment of them was engaged at Montevallo with Wilson, but they were mostly assembled at Mobile.

[The terms "promoted," "wounded," "captured," "killed," &c., used in this record, express only events that befell the officer while holding that rank in the particular command where his name is found. The word "retired" signifies that the officer left the service at the recommendation of a board of surgeons, either in consequence of wounds or disease.]